Women and Writing

Work

Woolf is considered to be one of the more important 20th century novelists.[298] A modernist, she was one of the pioneers of using stream of consciousness as a narrative device, alongside contemporaries such as Marcel Proust,[299][300] Dorothy Richardson and James Joyce.[301][302][303] Woolf's reputation was at its greatest during the 1930s, but declined considerably following World War II. The growth of feminist criticism in the 1970s helped re-establish her reputation.[304][262]

Virginia submitted her first article in 1890, to a competition in Tit-Bits. Although it was rejected, this shipboard romance by the 8-year-old would presage her first novel 25 years later, as would contributions to the Hyde Park News, such as the model letter "to show young people the right way to express what is in their hearts", a subtle commentary on her mother's legendary matchmaking.[305][306] She transitioned from juvenilia to professional journalism in 1904 at the age of 22. Violet Dickinson introduced her to Mrs. Lyttelton, the editor of the Women's Supplement of The Guardian, a Church of England newspaper. Invited to submit a 1,500-word article, Virginia sent Lyttelton a review of W.D. Howells' The Son of Royal Langbirth and an essay about her visit to Haworth that year, Haworth, November 1904.[307][4] The review was published anonymously on 4 December, and the essay on the 21st.[308][309] In 1905, Woolf began writing for The Times Literary Supplement.[310]

Woolf would go on to publish novels and essays as a public intellectual to both critical and popular acclaim. Much of her work was self-published through the Hogarth Press. "Virginia Woolf's peculiarities as a fiction writer have tended to obscure her central strength: she is arguably the major lyrical novelist in the English language. Her novels are highly experimental: a narrative, frequently uneventful and commonplace, is refracted—and sometimes almost dissolved—in the characters' receptive consciousness. Intense lyricism and stylistic virtuosity fuse to create a world overabundant with auditory and visual impressions".[311] "The intensity of Virginia Woolf's poetic vision elevates the ordinary, sometimes banal settings"—often wartime environments—"of most of her novels".[311]

Fiction and drama

Novels

Her first novel, The Voyage Out,[167] was published in 1915 at the age of 33, by her half-brother's imprint, Gerald Duckworth and Company Ltd. This novel was originally titled Melymbrosia, but Woolf repeatedly changed the draft. An earlier version of The Voyage Out has been reconstructed by Woolf scholar Louise DeSalvo and is now available to the public under the intended title. DeSalvo argues that many of the changes Woolf made in the text were in response to changes in her own life.[312] The novel is set on a ship bound for South America, and a group of young Edwardians onboard and their various mismatched yearnings and misunderstandings. In the novel are hints of themes that would emerge in later work, including the gap between preceding thought and the spoken word that follows, and the lack of concordance between expression and underlying intention, together with how these reveal to us aspects of the nature of love.[313]

"Mrs Dalloway (1925)[196] centres on the efforts of Clarissa Dalloway, a middle-aged society woman, to organise a party, even as her life is paralleled with that of Septimus Warren Smith, a working-class veteran who has returned from the First World War bearing deep psychological scars".[311]

"To the Lighthouse (1927)[39] is set on two days ten years apart. The plot centres on the Ramsay family's anticipation of and reflection upon a visit to a lighthouse and the connected familial tensions. One of the primary themes of the novel is the struggle in the creative process that beset painter Lily Briscoe while she struggles to paint in the midst of the family drama. The novel is also a meditation upon the lives of a nation's inhabitants in the midst of war, and of the people left behind."[311] It also explores the passage of time, and how women are forced by society to allow men to take emotional strength from them.[314]

Orlando: A Biography (1928)[197] is one of Virginia Woolf's lightest novels. A parodic biography of a young nobleman who lives for three centuries without ageing much past thirty (but who does abruptly turn into a woman), the book is in part a portrait of Woolf's lover Vita Sackville-West.[315] It was meant to console Vita for the loss of her ancestral home, Knole House, though it is also a satirical treatment of Vita and her work. In Orlando, the techniques of historical biographers are being ridiculed; the character of a pompous biographer is being assumed for it to be mocked.[316]

"The Waves (1931) presents a group of six friends whose reflections, which are closer to recitatives than to interior monologues proper, create a wave-like atmosphere that is more akin to a prose poem than to a plot-centred novel".[311]

Flush: A Biography (1933)[317] is a part-fiction, part-biography of the cocker spaniel owned by Victorian poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning. The book is written from the dog's point of view. Woolf was inspired to write this book from the success of the Rudolf Besier play The Barretts of Wimpole Street. In the play, Flush is on stage for much of the action. The play was produced for the first time in 1932 by the actress Katharine Cornell.

The Years (1936),[1] traces the history of the genteel Pargiter family from the 1880s to the "present day" of the mid-1930s. The novel had its origin in a lecture Woolf gave to the National Society for Women's Service in 1931, an edited version of which would later be published as "Professions for Women".[318] Woolf first thought of making this lecture the basis of a new book-length essay on women, this time taking a broader view of their economic and social life, rather than focusing on women as artists, as the first book had. She soon jettisoned the theoretical framework of her "novel-essay" and began to rework the book solely as a fictional narrative, but some of the non-fiction material she first intended for this book was later used in Three Guineas (1938).

"Her last work, Between the Acts (1941),[244] sums up and magnifies Woolf's chief preoccupations: the transformation of life through art, sexual ambivalence, and meditation on the themes of flux of time and life, presented simultaneously as corrosion and rejuvenation—all set in a highly imaginative and symbolic narrative encompassing almost all of English history."[311] This book is the most lyrical of all her works, not only in feeling but in style, being chiefly written in verse.[319] While Woolf's work can be understood as consistently in dialogue with the Bloomsbury Group, particularly its tendency (informed by G.E. Moore, among others) towards doctrinaire rationalism, it is not a simple recapitulation of the coterie's ideals.[15]

Themes

Woolf's fiction has been studied for its insight into many themes including war, shell shock, witchcraft, and the role of social class in contemporary modern British society.[320] In the postwar Mrs Dalloway (1925),[196] Woolf addresses the moral dilemma of war and its effects[321][322] and provides an authentic voice for soldiers returning from World War I, suffering from shell shock, in the person of Septimus Smith.[323] In A Room of One's Own (1929) Woolf equates historical accusations of witchcraft with creativity and genius among women[324] "When, however, one reads of a witch being ducked, of a woman possessed by devils...then I think we are on the track of a lost novelist, a suppressed poet, of some mute and inglorious Jane Austen".[325] Throughout her work Woolf tried to evaluate the degree to which her privileged background framed the lens through which she viewed class.[326][240] She both examined her own position as someone who would be considered an elitist snob, but attacked the class structure of Britain as she found it. In her 1936 essay Am I a Snob?,[327] she examined her values and those of the privileged circle she existed in. She concluded she was, and subsequent critics and supporters have tried to deal with the dilemma of being both elite and a social critic.[328][329][330]

The sea is a recurring motif in Woolf's work. Noting Woolf's early memory of listening to waves break in Cornwall, Katharine Smyth writes in The Paris Review that ‘the radiance [of] cresting water would be consecrated again and again in her writing, saturating not only essays, diaries, and letters but also Jacob’s Room, The Waves, and To the Lighthouse.’[331] Patrizia A. Muscogiuri explains that ‘seascapes, sailing, diving and the sea itself are aspects of nature and of human beings’ relationship with it which frequently inspired Virginia Woolf's writing.’[332] This trope is deeply embedded in her texts’ structure and grammar: James Antoniou notes in Sydney Morning Herald how ‘Woolf made a virtue of the semicolon, the shape and function of which resembles the wave, her most famous motif.’[333]

Despite the considerable conceptual difficulties, given Woolf's idiosyncratic use of language,[334] her works have been translated into over 50 languages.[320][335] Some writers, such as the Belgian Marguerite Yourcenar, had rather tense encounters with her, while others, such as the Argentinian Jorge Luis Borges, produced versions that were highly controversial.[334][262]

Drama

Virginia Woolf researched the life of her great-aunt, the photographer Julia Margaret Cameron, publishing her findings in an essay titled "Pattledom" (1925),[336] and later in her introduction to her 1926 edition of Cameron's photographs.[337][338] She had begun work on a play based on an episode in Cameron's life in 1923, but abandoned it. Finally it was performed on 18 January 1935 at the studio of her sister, Vanessa Bell on Fitzroy Street in 1935.[339] Woolf directed it herself, and the cast were mainly members of the Bloomsbury Group, including herself. Freshwater is a short three act comedy satirising the Victorian era, only performed once in Woolf's lifetime.[199] Beneath the comedic elements, there is an exploration of both generational change and artistic freedom. Both Cameron and Woolf fought against the class and gender dynamics of Victorianism[340] and the play shows links to both To the Lighthouse and A Room of One's Own that would follow.[338]

Non-fiction

Woolf wrote a body of autobiographical work and more than 500 essays and reviews,[216] some of which, like A Room of One's Own (1929) were of book length. Not all were published in her lifetime. Shortly after her death, Leonard Woolf produced an edited edition of unpublished essays titled The Moment and other Essays,[341] published by the Hogarth Press in 1947. Many of these were originally lectures that she gave,[342] and several more volumes of essays followed, such as The Captain's Death Bed: and other essays (1950).[343]

A Room of One's Own

Among Woolf's non-fiction works, one of the best known is A Room of One's Own (1929),[198] a book-length essay. Considered a key work of feminist literary criticism, it was written following two lectures she delivered on "Women and Fiction" at Cambridge University the previous year. In it, she examines the historical disempowerment women have faced in many spheres, including social, educational and financial. One of her more famous dicta is contained within the book "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction". Much of her argument ("to show you how I arrived at this opinion about the room and the money") is developed through the "unsolved problems" of women and fiction writing to arrive at her conclusion, although she claimed that was only "an opinion upon one minor point".[344] In doing so, she states a good deal about the nature of women and fiction, employing a quasi-fictional style as she examines where women writers failed because of lack of resources and opportunities, examining along the way the experiences of the Brontës, George Eliot and George Sand, as well as the fictional character of Shakespeare's sister, equipped with the same genius but not position. She contrasted these women who accepted a deferential status with Jane Austen, who wrote entirely as a woman.[345]

Influences

Michel Lackey argues that a major influence on Woolf, from 1912 onward, was Russian literature and Woolf adopted many of its aesthetic conventions.[346] The style of Fyodor Dostoyevsky with his depiction of a fluid mind in operation helped to influence Woolf's writings about a "discontinuous writing process", though Woolf objected to Dostoyevsky's obsession with "psychological extremity" and the "tumultuous flux of emotions" in his characters together with his right-wing, monarchist politics as Dostoyevsky was an ardent supporter of the autocracy of the Russian Empire.[346] In contrast to her objections to Dostoyevsky's "exaggerated emotional pitch", Woolf found much to admire in the work of Anton Chekhov and Leo Tolstoy.[346] Woolf admired Chekhov for his stories of ordinary people living their lives, doing banal things and plots that had no neat endings.[346] From Tolstoy, Woolf drew lessons about how a novelist should depict a character's psychological state and the interior tension within.[346] Lackey notes that, from Ivan Turgenev, Woolf drew the lessons that there are multiple "I's" when writing a novel, and the novelist needed to balance those multiple versions of him- or herself to balance the "mundane facts" of a story vs. the writer's overarching vision, which required a "total passion" for art.[346]

Another influence on Woolf was the American writer Henry David Thoreau, with Woolf writing in a 1917 essay that her aim as a writer was to follow Thoreau by capturing "the moment, to burn always with this hard, gem-like flame" while praising Thoreau for his statement "The millions are awake enough for physical labor, but only one in hundreds of millions is awake enough to a poetic or divine life. To be awake is to be alive".[347] Woolf praised Thoreau for his "simplicity" in finding "a way for setting free the delicate and complicated machinery of the soul".[347] Like Thoreau, Woolf believed that it was silence that set the mind free to really contemplate and understand the world.[347] Both authors believed in a certain transcendental, mystical approach to life and writing, where even banal things could be capable of generating deep emotions if one had enough silence and the presence of mind to appreciate them.[347] Woolf and Thoreau were both concerned with the difficulty of human relationships in the modern age.[347] Other notable influences include William Shakespeare, George Eliot, Leo Tolstoy, Marcel Proust, Anton Chekhov, Emily Brontë, Daniel Defoe, James Joyce, and E.M. Forster.

List of selected publications

  see Kirkpatrick & Clarke (1997), VWS (2018), Carter (2002)

Novels

  • Woolf, Virginia (2017) [1915]. The voyage out. FV Éditions. ISBN 979-10-299-0459-2. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2018. see also The Voyage Out & Complete text Archived 29 July 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2004) [1919a]. Night and Day. 1st World Publishing. ISBN 978-1-59540-530-2. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 11 April 2018. see also Night and Day & Complete text Archived 29 August 2017 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2015) [1922a]. Jacob's Room. Mondial. ISBN 978-1-59569-114-9. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2018. see also Jacob's Room & Complete text Archived 1 March 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2012) [1925]. Mrs. Dalloway. Broadview Press. ISBN 978-1-55111-723-2. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 1 March 2018. see also Mrs Dalloway & Complete text Archived 1 March 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2004) [1927]. To the Lighthouse. Collector's Library. ISBN 978-1-904633-49-5. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 23 February 2018. see also To the Lighthouse & Complete text, also Texts at Woolf Online Archived 18 August 2021 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2006) [1928]. DiBattista, Maria (ed.). Orlando (Annotated): A Biography. HMH. ISBN 978-0-547-54316-1. see also Orlando: A Biography & Complete text Archived 31 July 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2000) [1931]. The Waves. Wordsworth Editions. ISBN 978-1-84022-410-8. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2018. see also The Waves & Complete text Archived 29 July 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (1936). The Years. Hogarth Press.
  • — (2014) [1941]. Between the Acts. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN 978-0-544-45178-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 1 March 2018. see also Between the Acts & Complete text Archived 5 December 2018 at the Wayback Machine

Short stories

  • Woolf, Virginia (2016a) [1944]. The Short Stories of Virginia Woolf. Read Books Limited. ISBN 978-1-4733-6304-5. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2018. see also A Haunted House and Other Short Stories & Complete text Archived 12 April 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2015) [1917 Hogarth Press]. The Mark on the Wall. Booklassic. ISBN 978-963-522-263-6. see also The Mark on the Wall & Complete text Archived 29 March 2017 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (7 July 2015) [1919b Hogarth Press]. Kew Gardens. Booklassic. ISBN 978-963-522-264-3. see also Kew Gardens & Complete text Archived 29 March 2017 at the Wayback Machine

Cross-genre

  • Woolf, Virginia (1998) [1933]. Flush. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-283328-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 4 March 2018. see also Flush: A Biography & Complete text Archived 5 March 2018 at the Wayback Machine

Drama

  • Woolf, Virginia (2017) [1935]. Freshwater: A Comedy by Virginia Woolf (The 1923 & 1935 Editions). Musaicum Books. ISBN 978-80-272-3556-8. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2018. see also Freshwater
  • — (1976). Ruotolo, Lucio (ed.). Freshwater: a comedy. Illustrations: Edward Gorey. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 9780151334872. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2018.

Biography

  • Woolf, Virginia (2017) [1940]. Roger Fry: A Biography. Musaicum Books. ISBN 978-80-272-3516-2. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2018. see also Roger Fry: A Biography & Complete text

Essays

  • Woolf, Virginia (14 December 1904). "Haworth, November 1904". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  • — (2016) [1929]. A Room of One's Own. Read Books Limited. ISBN 978-1-4733-6305-2. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2018. see also A Room of One's Own & Complete text Archived 21 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2017) [1924 Hogarth Press]. Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown. ISBN 978-88-260-3291-7. see also Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown & Complete text Archived 28 March 2017 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2016) [1932 Hogarth Press]. A Letter to a Young Poet. Read Books Limited. ISBN 978-1-4733-6307-6. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 7 April 2018. see also A Letter to a Young Poet & Complete text Archived 21 June 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2016) [1938]. Three Guineas. Read Books Limited. ISBN 978-1-4733-6301-4. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2018. see also Three Guineas & Complete text Archived 15 February 2018 at the Wayback Machine
Essay collections
  • Woolf, Virginia (1986–2011). McNeillie, Andrew; Clarke, Stuart N. (eds.). The Essays of Virginia Woolf 6 vols. Random House.
    • — (1986). The Essays of Virginia Woolf Volume Two 1912–1918. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 978-0-15-629055-5. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
      • Ackroyd 1988 (Review)
    • — (1994). The Essays of Virginia Woolf Volume Four 1925–1928. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 978-0-7012-0666-6. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2018.
    • — (2017). The Essays of Virginia Woolf Volume Five 1929–1932. Random House. ISBN 978-1-4481-8194-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
    • — (2011). The Essays of Virginia Woolf Volume Six 1933–1941. Random House. ISBN 978-0-7012-0671-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
      • Patten 2011 (Review)
  • — (2016b). The Collected Essays and Letters of Virginia Woolf – Including a Short Biography of the Author. Read Books Limited. ISBN 978-1-4733-6310-6. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  • — (2017) [1947 Hogarth Press]. Woolf, Leonard (ed.). The Moment & Other Essays (posthumous). Musaicum Books. ISBN 978-80-272-3619-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2018. Complete text Archived 3 March 2018 at the Wayback Machine
    • The Leaning Tower. 1940. pp. 100ff. Archived from the original on 3 March 2018. Retrieved 29 March 2018.
      • Trilling 1948 (Review)
  • — (1950). Woolf, Leonard (ed.). The Captain's death bed: and other essays (posthumous). Hogarth Press. ISBN 9780701204563. (excerpts)
    • — (1932). Leslie Stephen. pp. 67–73. (excerpt) & also here Archived 11 June 2020 at the Wayback Machine
  • — (2009). Bradshaw, David (ed.). Selected Essays. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-955606-9. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  • — (2017). The Greatest Essays of Virginia Woolf. Musaicum Books. ISBN 978-80-272-3514-8. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2018.

Contributions

  • Cameron, Julia Margaret (1973) [1926 Hogarth Press, edited by Leonard and Virginia Woolf]. Powell, Tristram (ed.). Victorian photographs of famous men & fair women. Introductions by Virginia Woolf and Roger Fry (Revised ed.). D. R. Godine. ISBN 978-0-87923-076-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2018. (Digital edition)

Autobiographical writing

  • Woolf, Virginia (2003) [1953]. Woolf, Leonard (ed.). A Writer's Diary. HMH. ISBN 978-0-547-54691-9. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
    • Auden 1954 (Review)
  • — (1985) [1976]. Schulkind, Jeanne (ed.). Moments of being: unpublished autobiographical writings (2nd ed.). Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 978-0-15-162034-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2018. (see Moments of Being)
    • Schulkind, Jeanne (2007). Preface to the Second Edition. p. 6. Bibcode:2007ess..bookD..17M., in Woolf (1985) (excerpts)
    • Schulkind, Jeanne. Introduction. pp. 11–24., in Woolf (1985)
    • Reminiscences. 1908. pp. 25–60.
    • A Sketch of the Past. 1940. pp. 61–160.[af] (excerpts – 1st ed.)
      Memoir Club Contributions
      • 22 Hyde Park Gate. 1921. pp. 162–178.
      • Old Bloomsbury. 1922. pp. 179–202.
      • Am I a Snob?. 1936. pp. 203–220.

Diaries and notebooks

  • Woolf, Virginia (1990). Leaska, Mitchell A (ed.). A passionate apprentice: the early journals, 1897–1909. Hogarth Press. ISBN 9780701208455. Archived from the original on 16 December 2019. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
  • Woolf, Virginia (2003). Bradshaw, David (ed.). Carlyle's House and Other Sketches. Hesperus Press. ISBN 978-1-84391-055-8.
  • Woolf, Virginia (1977–1984). Bell, Anne Oliver (ed.). The Diary of Virginia Woolf 5 vols. Houghton Mifflin.
    • — (1979). The Diary of Virginia Woolf Volume One 1915–1919. ISBN 978-0-544-31037-7. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
    • — (1981). The Diary of Virginia Woolf Volume Two 1920–1924. ISBN 978-0-14-005283-1. Archived from the original on 4 February 2021. Retrieved 5 June 2020.
    • — (1978). The Diary of Virginia Woolf Volume Three 1925–1930. ISBN 9780151255993. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
    • — (1985). The Diary of Virginia Woolf Volume Five 1936–1941. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN 978-0-15-626040-4. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  • — (2008). Rosenbaum, S. P. (ed.). The Platform of Time: Memoirs of Family and Friends. Hesperus Press. ISBN 978-1-84391-711-3. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2018.

Letters

  • — (1975–1980). Nicolson, Nigel; Banks, Joanne Trautmann (eds.). The Letters of Virginia Woolf 6 vols. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 9780151509263.
    • — (1977). The Letters of Virginia Woolf Volume One 1888–1912. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 978-0-15-650881-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
      • "Shut up in the Dark (Letter 531: Vanessa Bell, July 28, 1910)". The Paris Review. 25 January 2017. Archived from the original on 11 April 2018. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
    • — (1982). The Letters of Virginia Woolf Volume Two 1912–1922. Harvest/HBJ Books. ISBN 978-0-15-650882-7. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
    • — (1975). The Letters of Virginia Woolf Volume Three 1923–1928. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 978-0-15-150926-3. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
    • — (1979). The Letters of Virginia Woolf Volume Four 1929–1931. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 978-0-15-150927-0. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 13 April 2018.
      • Edel 1979 (Review)
    • — (1982). The Letters of Virginia Woolf Volume Five 1932–1935. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN 978-0-15-650886-5. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 22 February 2018.

Photograph albums

  • Woolf, Virginia (1983). "Virginia Woolf Monk's House photographs, ca. 1867-1967 (MS Thr 564)" (Guide). Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard Library. Archived from the original on 2 February 2018. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
    • List of Album Guides Archived 11 June 2020 at the Wayback Machine
  1. Album 1 MS Thr 557 (1863–1938) Archived 2 February 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  2. Album 2 MS Thr 559 (1909–1922) Archived 2 February 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  3. Album 3 MS Thr 560 (1890–1933) Archived 28 January 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Album 4 MS Thr 561 (1890–1947) Archived 31 January 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  5. Album 5 MS Thr 562 (1892–1938) Archived 2 February 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  6. Album 6 MS Thr 563 (1850–1900) Archived 2 February 2018 at the Wayback Machine

Collections

  • Woolf, Virginia (2013). Delphi Complete Works of Virginia Woolf (Illustrated). Delphi Classics. ISBN 978-1-908909-19-0. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  • — (2015). "eBooks@Adelaide". Library of University of Adelaide. Archived from the original on 12 April 2018. Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  • — (2017a). The Complete Works of Virginia Woolf. Musaicum Books. ISBN 978-80-272-1784-7. Archived from the original on 11 June 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  • — (2007). "Virginia Woolf". Project Gutenberg Australia. Archived from the original on 26 March 2018. Retrieved 27 March 2018.

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