Fahrenheit 451

Cultural references

Michael Moore's 2004 documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 refers to Bradbury's novel and the September 11 attacks, emphasized by the film's tagline "The temperature where freedom burns". The film takes a critical look at the presidency of George W. Bush, the War on Terror, and its coverage in the news media, and became the highest grossing documentary of all time.[106] Bradbury was upset by what he considered the appropriation of his title, and wanted the film renamed.[107][108]

In 2015, the Internet Engineering Steering Group approved the publication of An HTTP Status Code to Report Legal Obstacles, now RFC 7725, which specifies that websites forced to block resources for legal reasons should return a status code of 451 when users request those resources.[109][110][111][112]

Centigrade 232 is a poem by Robert Calvert, published in a 1977 book and released as an album in 2007. The title alludes to Fahrenheit 451 by its metric equivalent, "signifying the writer destroying his rough drafts".[113]

In book 14 of the Guardians of Ga'Hoole series by Kathryn Lasky, published in 2008, Braithe states that the name of the Place of Living Books, also called Brad, comes from an author's name: "The author's full name is not known. We call him Ray Brad. We think it's only scraps of his name but what is important is that he wrote about book burning", thus referencing Fahrenheit 451.[114]


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