Crime and Punishment

References

  1. ^ University of Minnesota – Study notes for Crime and Punishment – (retrieved on 1 May 2006)
  2. ^ Frank (1995), 96
  3. ^ Yousef, About Crime and Punishment* Fanger (2006), 17–18
  4. ^ Frank, 170* Peace (2005), 8* Simmons (2007), 131
  5. ^ Frank (1994), 168
  6. ^ Miller (2007), 58* Peace (2008), 8
  7. ^ Frank (1994), 179
  8. ^ Miller (2007), 58–59
  9. ^ Frank (1995), 39* Peace (2005), 8
  10. ^ Simmons (2007), 131
  11. ^ Miller (2007), 58
  12. ^ Dostoevsky initially considered four first-person plans: a memoir written by Raskolnikov, his confession recorded eight days after the murder, his diary begun five days after the murder, and a mixed form in which the first half was in the form of a memoir, and the second half in the form of a diary (Rosenshield [1973], 399).
  13. ^ Carabine (2000), x* Frank (1994), 170–172* Frank (1995), 80
  14. ^ Frank (1994), 185
  15. ^ Frank (1994), 174
  16. ^ Frank (1994), 177
  17. ^ Frank (1994), 175
  18. ^ Frank (1994), 179–180, 182
  19. ^ Frank (1994), 170, 179–180, 184* Frank(1995), 93* Miller (2007), 58–59
  20. ^ Peace (2005), 8–9 Don't cheat
  21. ^ Frank (1995), 97
  22. ^ Rosenshield (1978), 76. See also Fanger (2006), 21
  23. ^ a b Davydov (1982), 162–163
  24. ^ "On the Structure of Crime and Punishment, " in: PMLA, March 1959, vol. LXXIV, No. 1, p. 132–133.
  25. ^ Church (1983), 103
  26. ^ Mikhail Bakhtin, for instance, regards the Epilogue a blemish on the book (Wellek [1980], 33).
  27. ^ Cassedy (1982), 171
  28. ^ Cassedy (1982), 187
  29. ^ Frank (1994), 184* Frank (1995), 92–93
  30. ^ Morris (1984), 28* Peace (2005), 86* Stanton–Hardy (1999), 8
  31. ^ Monas, Sidney, "Afterword: The Dream of the Suffering Horse," from his translation
  32. ^ Dostoyevsky, Fyodor. Crime and punishment. Toronto: Bantam Books, 1987. Print.
  33. ^ Richard Gill points out that "the hump-backed bridges crisscrossing Czar Peter's labyrinthine city are, as found in the novel, likewise to be viewed as metaphorical and highly suitable for marking the stages of the tortuous course of Raskolnikov's internal drama" (Gill [1982], 146).
  34. ^ Gill (1982), 145
  35. ^ Fanger (2006), 24
  36. ^ Lindenmeyr (2006), 37
  37. ^ Fanger (2006), 28
  38. ^ Top10books.org Archived 26 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine.
  39. ^ Frank (1995), 100
  40. ^ Donald Fanger believes that "Crime and Punishment did nothing by continue the polemic, incarnating the tragedy of nihilism in Raskolnikov and caricaturing it in Lebezyatnikov and, partially, in Luzhin" .(Fanger [2006], 21 – see also Frank [1995], 60; Ozick [1997], 114; Sergeyef [1998], 26).
  41. ^ Frank (1995), 100–101* Hudspith (2003), 95
  42. ^ Pisarev had sketched the outlines of a new proto-Nietzschean hero (Frank [1995], 100–101; Frank [2002], 11).
  43. ^ Frank (1995), 101
  44. ^ a b Frank (1995), 104
  45. ^ Frank (1995), 107* Sergeyef (1998), 26
  46. ^ Wasiolek (2005), 55
  47. ^ Vladimir Solovyov quoted by McDuff (2002), xiii–xiv* Peace (2005), 75–76
  48. ^ *McDuff (2002), xxx:"It is the persistent tracing of this theme of a 'Russian sickness' of spiritual origin and its cure throughout the book that justify the author's characterization of it as an 'Orthodox novel'."* Wasiolek (2005), 56–57
  49. ^ McDuff, x–xi
  50. ^ Jahn, Dostoevsky's Life and Career* McDuff, xi–xii
  51. ^ Raskolnikov Says the Darndest Things

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  • Dostoevsky, Fyodor (1866). Crime and Punishment. Translated in English by Constance Garnett.

Sources

  • Bourgeois, Patrick Lyall (1996). "Dostoevsky and Existentialism: An Experiment in Hermeunetics". In Mc Bride, William Leon. Existentialist Background. Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0-8153-2492-8.
  • Cassedy, Steven (1982). "The Formal Problem of the Epilogue in Crime and Punishment: The Logic of Tragic and Christian Structures". Dostoevsky Centenary Conference at the University of Nottingham. 3. International Dostoevsky Society. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013.
  • Church, Margaret (1983). "Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and Kafka's The Trial". Structure and Theme – Don Quixote to James Joyce. Ohio State University Press. ISBN 0-8142-0348-5.
  • Davydov, Sergei (1982). "Dostoevsky and Nabokov: The Morality of Structure in Crime and Punishment and Despair". Dostoevsky Centenary Conference at the University of Nottingham. 3. International Dostoevsky Society. Archived from the original on 20 June 2014.
  • Frank, Joseph (1994). "The Making of Crime and Punishment". In Polhemus, Robert M.; Henkle, Roger B. Critical Reconstructions: The Relationship of Fiction and Life. Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-2243-9.
  • Frank, Joseph (1995). Dostoevsky: The Miraculous Years, 1865–1871. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01587-2.
  • Frank, Joseph (2002). "Introduction". Dostoevsky: The Mantle of the Prophet, 1871–1881. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-11569-9.
  • Gill, Richard (1982). "The Bridges of St. Petesburg: a Motive in Crime and Punishment". Dostoevsky Centenary Conference at the University of Nottingham. 3. International Dostoevsky Society. Archived from the original on 19 September 2008.
  • Hardy, James D. Jr.; Stanton, Leonard J. (1999). "Introduction". Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Signet Classic. ISBN 0-451-52723-2.
  • Hudspith, Sarah (2003). "Dostoevsky's Dramatization of Slavophile Themes". Dostoevsky and the Idea of Russianness. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-30489-X.
  • Jahn, Gary R. "Dostoevsky's Life and Career, 1865–1881". University of Minnesota. Retrieved 24 August 2008.
  • McDuff, David (2002). "Introduction". Fyodor M. Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Penguin Classics. ISBN 0-14-044913-2.
  • Miller, Robin Feuer (2007). "Crime and Punishment in the Classroom". Dostoevsky's Unfinished Journey. Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-12015-X.
  • Morris, Virginia B. (1984). "Style". Fyodor M. Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Barron's Educational Series. ISBN 0-8120-3409-0.
  • Ozick, Cynthia (24 February 1997). "Dostoyevsky's Unabomber". The New Yorker: 114. Retrieved 17 August 2008.
  • Peace, Richard Arthur (2006). Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment: A Casebook. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-517562-X.:
    • Peace, Richard. "Introduction". Peace, 1–16.
    • Fanger, Donald. "Apogee: Crime and Punishment". Peace, 17–35.
    • Lindenmeyr, Adele. "Raskolnikov's City and the Napoleonic Plan". Peace, 37–49.
    • Wasiolek, Edward. "Raskolnikov's City and the Napoleonic Plan". Peace, 51–74.
    • Peace, Richard. "Motive and Symbol". Peace, 75–101.
  • Rosenshield, Gary (Winter 1973). "First- Versus Third-Person Narration in Crime and Punishment". The Slavic and East European Journal. 17 (4): 399–407. doi:10.2307/305635. JSTOR 305635.
  • Rosenshield, Gary (1978). Crime and Punishment: The Techniques of the Omniscient Author. Peter de Ridder Press. ISBN 90-316-0104-7.
  • Sergeyev, Victor M. (1998). "Moral Practices and the Law". The Wild East: Crime and Lawlessness in Post-communist Russia. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 0-7656-0231-8.
  • Simmons, Ernest J. (2007). "In the Author's Laboratory". Dostoevsky – The Making of a Novelist. Read Books. ISBN 1-4067-6362-4.
  • Wellek, René (1980). "Bakhtin's view of Dostoevsky: 'Polyphony' and 'Carnivalesque'". Dostoevsky Studies – Form and Structure. 1. International Dostoevsky Society. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013.

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