Gwendolyn Brooks: Poems

Introduction

Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks (June 7, 1917 – December 3, 2000) was an American poet, author, and teacher. Her work often dealt with the personal celebrations and struggles of ordinary people in her community. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry on May 1, 1950, for Annie Allen,[1] making her the first African American to receive the Pulitzer.[2]

Throughout her prolific writing career, Brooks received many more honors. She was appointed Poet Laureate of Illinois in 1968, a position she held until her death,[3] and what is now the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress for the 1985–86 term.[4] In 1976, she became the first African-American woman inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.[5]

Brooks was born in Topeka, Kansas and at six weeks old was taken to Chicago, where she lived the rest of her life. Her parents, especially her mother, encouraged her poetry writing. She began submitting poems to various publications as a teenager. After graduating high school during the Great Depression, she took a two-year junior college program, worked as a typist, married, and had children. Continuing to write and submit her work, she finally found substantial outlets for her poetry. This recognition of her work also led her to lecturing and teaching aspiring writers. Being the winner of multiple awards for her writing, several schools and institutions have been named in her honor.


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