John Keats Essays

12th Grade

Keats' Poems and Letters

“He lived in mythology and a fairyland”: this sentiment expressed by Hopkins demonstrates how Keats could easily be perceived as fully immersing himself in an imaginative dream world, yet fails to encompass the notion that he does attempt to play...

12th Grade

Keats' Poems and Letters

Keats evidently uses his poetry as a form of escapism, thus valuing emotions and imagination over logic an reality, as he is able to craft his own form of reality through his writing. Many have speculated that this is due to his, arguably,...

College

Keats' Poems and Letters

Abstract

Emerging out of the need for freedom of self-expression in literature, romanticism materialized as the age of unrequited love, sentimentality, melancholy and death. It was a reaction against the rationality of the previous age where...

Keats' Poems and Letters

John Keats' poems "When I Have Fears" and "Bright Star" are remarkably similar, yet drastically different at the same time. The Shakespearean sonnets share rhyme scheme as well as subject matter, yet deal with different facets of the same topic....

Keats' Poems and Letters

"The Eve of St. Agnes" tells the fantastic story of a bewitching night when two lovers consummate their relationship and elope. It takes place on the Eve of St. Agnes, a night when "young virgins have visions of delight," giving the action of the...

Keats' Poems and Letters

The Romantic Movement of poetry focused on the return to the individual as much as the political revolutions of the time. In doing so, there is also a return to the natural world in poetry that had been superseded by a more predominant abstract...

Keats' Poems and Letters

In "Ode to a Nightingale," John Keats uses nature and a nightingale as figures for an optimistic view on mortality, and on the speaker's life specifically. Throughout the poem, the nightingale itself is an figure for the beautiful and cyclical...

Keats' Poems and Letters

Keats’ “To Autumn” is an ode that concerns itself more with the true nature of reality than many of his earlier works. The Spring Odes—“Ode to Psych”, “Ode to a Nightingale”, and “Ode on a Grecian Urn”—are all representative of consistent...