Biography of Dr. Seuss

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born in Springfield, Massachusetts and earned his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1925. He began working as an illustrator and humorist for several publications and in the advertising industry. During this time, his work often contained racist and sexist stereotypes, and his work wasn't brilliant from the start. He worked hard, however, and eventually began writing children's books under the now-familiar name, Dr. Seuss. After a rocky start, his work gained popular momentum and he signed with the publisher Random House. In 1984, Dr. Seuss was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his contribution to children's literature.


Study Guides on Works by Dr. Seuss

In 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins (originally published 1938), prolific and respected author Dr. Seuss crafts a modern fairy tale. Here, the author tells the story of a young peasant named Bartholomew Cubbins who is constantly mistreated by a man...

Bartholomew and the Oobleck is a children's story book by the famous author of children's literature. Unlike his other famous works this book has a prose narration, with rhymes only appearing a few times.

The story follows a young Bartholomew...

Like most Dr Seuss books, The Butter Battle Book seems at first glance to be nothing more than a fun book of rhyming prose that appeals to children and helps them to learn how to engage with books a little better. Also like most Dr Seuss books, ...

In The Cat in the Hat Comes Back, which is the sequel to Dr. Seuss' ultra-famous The Cat in the Hat, Dr. Seuss once again tells the story of the eponymous Cat in the Hat, who one day comes back to Sally and her brother's house when their mother...

The Cat in the Hat (originally published in 1957) is arguably Dr. Seuss' most famous and widely-read work. It tells the story of the eponymous Cat in the Hat, who one day shows up at Sally and her brother's house when their mother is away from the...

The Foot Book is one of Dr. Seuss' most unique and interesting books in the sense that it lacks a more traditional narrative. Through rhyme, repetition, and the depiction of a number of different kinds of feet ("Wet foot, dry foot. Low foot, high...

Although it is hard to imagine not reading any Dr. Seuss book out loud at least once, Fox in Socks was published with the specific encouragement that its intricate web of dizzying rhymes be externally vocalized. The book was first published in...

Green Eggs and Ham is one of Dr. Seuss' many classic books for children. It tells the story of Sam-I-Am, who implores his friend to eat a plate of green eggs and ham in nearly a half dozen places. However, his friend doesn't want to eat green eggs...

Dr. Seuss' Hop on Pop (originally published in 1963) was created with a single purpose in mind: to introduce young readers to phonics and to words that rhyme like Cup and Pup and Mouse and House and Tall and Small and Hop and Pop. After Seuss...

It was in 1940's Horton Hatches the Egg that Dr. Seuss introduced the general public to Horton the Elephant, who would become one of his most famous characters. In Horton Hatches the Egg, the eponymous Horton is tricked into sitting on a bird's...

In Horton Hears a Who!, which is no doubt one of Dr. Seuss' most famous and widely-read books, Dr. Seuss tells the story of the eponymous Horton the elephant, who continually goes out of his way to save the people of Whoville from the evil animals...

Over the course of his long and illustrious career, Dr. Seuss wrote more classic books than one could count on their hands. Among those classic books is How the Grinch Stole Christmas, which tells the story of the eponymous Grinch, a mean and...

Although Hunches in Bunches (originally published in 1982) is one of Dr. Seuss' lesser-known books, it tells the incredibly interesting story of a boy who is approached by strange-looking things with hats that look like gloves on their heads. Some...

Originally published in 1950, If I Ran the Zoo is one of Dr. Seuss' countless children's books. It tells the story of a young boy named Gerald McGrew, who, after visiting a zoo, says that the exotic animals he sees are not good and exciting...

Dr. Seuss' The King's Stilts (originally published in 1939) tells the rather whimsical story of King Birtram of Binn. This monarch is obsessed with protecting his kingdom from floods (caused by the destruction of pike trees by the evil nizzards)...

The Lorax is a 1971 children’s fiction book written by Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel). Though it was first published in 1971 by Random House, several newer versions have been edited and re-published, including the most sold 1999 edition. The original...

Oh, the Places You’ll Go was published by Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel) in 1990, roughly a year and a half before his death. This makes Oh, the Places You’ll Go the last book that the author published while he was still alive. The book reached number...

The Sneetches and Other Stories (originally published in 1961) collects four famous Dr. Seuss stories, including: the title story called "The Sneetches," "The Zax," "Too Many Daves," and "What Was I Scared Of."

In the title story called "The...

There's a Wocket in my Pocket is one of Dr. Seuss' many classic books. It tells the simple but engaging story of a little boy who talks about the strange and interesting things that live in his house including the yeps on the steps, the wasket in...

In Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose, acclaimed and prolific author Dr. Seuss tells the story of eponymous Thidwick the Moose, a kind creature who allows an incredibly interesting and diverse group of creatures take refuges in his antlers. But when...

What Pet Should I Get? (originally published in 2015) marks the first of many lost Dr. Seuss work to be published. It tells the story of Jay and Kay's (the two children from One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish) attempts to find themselves a...

Although he is best-known for his full-length children's books, Dr. Seuss wrote quite a few shorter stories for children. Three of those stories are collected in Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories, including "Yertle the Turtle," which tells the...

Although it is one of the least-known books by Dr. Seuss, You're Only Old Once (originally published in 1986) tells an interesting story of an older man who visits the Golden Years Clinic. At the clinic, the man has to deal with incredibly long...