A Doll's House

Introduction

A Doll's House (Bokmål: Et dukkehjem; also translated as A Doll House) is a three-act play written by Norway's Henrik Ibsen. It premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, having been published earlier that month.[1] The play is set in a Norwegian town circa 1879.

The play is significant for the way it deals with the fate of a married woman, who at the time in Norway lacked reasonable opportunities for self-fulfillment in a male-dominated world. It aroused a great sensation at the time,[2] and caused a “storm of outraged controversy” that went beyond the theatre to the world newspapers and society.[3]

In 2006, the centennial of Ibsen's death, A Doll's House held the distinction of being the world's most performed play that year.[4] UNESCO has inscribed Ibsen's autographed manuscripts of A Doll's House on the Memory of the World Register in 2001, in recognition of their historical value.[5]

The title of the play is most commonly translated as A Doll's House, though some scholars use A Doll House. John Simon says that A Doll’s House is "the British term for what we call a 'dollhouse'".[6] Egil Törnqvist says of the alternative title: "Rather than being superior to the traditional rendering, it simply sounds more idiomatic to Americans."[7]


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