Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

What does Douglass learn about the history of slavery through the books that he reads that lead him to detest his master, even though in some ways, as a boy, Douglass felt he was “much better off” than some of the white boys in his neighborhood.

What does Douglass learn about the history of slavery through the books that he reads that lead him to detest his master, even though in some ways, as a boy, Douglass felt he was “much better off” than some of the white boys in his neighborhood. Cite textual evidence to support your answer.

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I used also to carry bread with me, enough of which was always in the house, and to which I was always welcome; for I was much better off in this regard than many of the poor white children in our neighborhood. This bread I used to bestow upon the hungry little urchins, who, in return, would give me that more valuable bread of knowledge.

“The more I read, the more I was led to abhor and detest my enslavers. I could regard them in no other light than a band of successful robbers, who had left their homes, and gone to Africa, and stolen us from our homes, and in a strange land reduced us to slavery.” Douglass’s essay was published in 1845, a time of hardships for colored peoples. The majority of colored people were enslaved and those who were free usually were illiterate. Given these facts and the caliber of Douglass’s language and diction as exemplified in the lines above, who is this essay geared toward/ whose support is Douglass attempting to rally?

“The more I read, the more I was led to abhor and detest my enslavers. I could regard them in no other light than a band of successful robbers, who had left their homes, and gone to Africa, and stolen us from our homes, and in a strange land reduced us to slavery.”

Douglass’s essay was published in 1845, a time of hardships for colored peoples. The majority of colored people were enslaved and those who were free usually were illiterate. Given these facts and the caliber of Douglass’s language and diction as exemplified in the lines above, who is this essay geared toward/ whose support is Douglass attempting to rally?

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Samantha Grech