The Seducer's Diary

Notes

  1. ^ Swenson, David F. Something About Kierkegaard, Mercer University Press, 2000.
  2. ^ Gardiner 1969
  3. ^ See Eighteen Upbuilding Discourses, Hong trans., p. 332ff (The Thorn in the Flesh) (arrogance)
  4. ^ Søren Kierkegaard 1846, Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, Hong p. 310-311
  5. ^ See Book Twelve of Goethe's Autobiography
  6. ^ Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, A Mimical-Pathetic-Dialectical Compilation an Existential Contribution Volume I, by Johannes Climacus, edited by Soren Kierkegaard, Copyright Feb 28, 1846 – Edited and Translated by Howard V. Hong and Edna H. Hong 1992 Princeton University Press p. 9-10
  7. ^ Point of View by Lowrie, p. 41, Practice in Christianity, Hong trans., 1991, Chapter VI, p. 233ff, Søren Kierkegaard 1847 Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, Hong p. 225-226, Works of Love IIIA, p. 91ff
  8. ^ a b Duncan 1976
  9. ^ Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, Hong trans., pp. 15–17, 555–610 Either/Or Vol II, pp. 14, 58, 216–217, 250 Hong
  10. ^ a b c Ostenfeld & McKinnon 1972
  11. ^ Howland 2006
  12. ^ Soren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, 1847 Hong 1995 p. 283
  13. ^ Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Hong trans., 1992, p. 131
  14. ^ Philosophical Fragments and Concluding Postscript both deal with the impossibility of an objectively demonstrated Christianity.
  15. ^ Stewart, Jon. (Ed.) Kierkegaard's Influence on Philosophy, Volume 11, Tomes I-III. Ashgate, 2012.
  16. ^ Stewart, Jon. (Ed.) Kierkegaard's Influence on Theology, Volume 10, Tomes I-III. Ashgate, 2012.
  17. ^ Stewart, Jon. (Ed.) Kierkegaard's Influence on Literature and Criticism, Social Science, and Social-Political Thought, Volumes 12–14. Ashgate, 2012.
  18. ^ Glimpses and Impressions of Kierkegaard, Thomas Henry Croxall, James Nisbet & Co 1959 p. 51 The quote came from Henriette Lund's Recollections of Søren Kierkegaard written in 1876 and published in 1909 Søren was her uncle. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001396450
  19. ^ Johannes Climacus by Søren Kierkegaard, p. 17
  20. ^ Dorrien 2012, p. 13
  21. ^ "See David F. Swenson's 1921 biography of SK, pp. 2, 13". Archive.org. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  22. ^ Kierkegaard's indebtedness to the Anti-Enlightenment author is explained in this book by Smith G Hamann 1730–1788 A Study In Christian Existence (1960) by Ronald Gregor Smith
  23. ^ Either/Or Part I Swenson, 1944, 1959 p. 1967ff Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Hong trans., p. 72ff
  24. ^ Either/Or Part I title page, Stages on Life's Way, p. 150, 216, 339
  25. ^ The Point of View of My Work as An Author: A Report to History by Søren Kierkegaard, written in 1848, published in 1859 by his brother Peter Kierkegaard Translated with introduction and notes by Walter Lowrie, 1962, Harper Torchbooks, pp. 48–49
  26. ^ Hohlenberg, Johannes (1954). Søren Kierkegaard. Translated by T.H. Croxall. Pantheon Books. OCLC 53008941. 
  27. ^ Watkin 2000
  28. ^ a b c d Garff 2005
  29. ^ Papers VI B 13 n.d 14-145, Søren Kierkegaard Works of Love, Hong p. 380 (1848), Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Hong p. 226ff, Sickness Unto Death, Hannay p. 154ff
  30. ^ Caesar did many an illustrious deed, but even if nothing were preserved but one single statement he is supposed to have made, I would admire him. After Cato committed suicide, Caesar is supposed to have said, "There Cato wrested from me my most beautiful victory, for I would have forgiven him." Stages on Life's Way, Hong p. 384, 481-485 he wrote more about this in 1847 and linked forgiveness to self-denial.

    In eternity you will not be asked how large a fortune you are leaving behind-the survivors ask about that; or about how many battles you won, about how sagacious you were, how powerful your influence-that after all, becomes your reputation for posterity. No, eternity will not ask about what worldly things you leave behind you in the world. But it will ask about what riches you have gathered in heaven, about how often you conquered your own mind, about what control you have exercised over yourself or whether you have been a slave, about how often you have mastered yourself in self-denial or whether you have never done so, about how often you in self-denial have been willing to make a sacrifice for a good cause or whether you were never willing, about how often you in self-denial have forgiven your enemy, whether seven times or seventy times seven times, about how often you have suffered, not for your own sake, for your own selfish interests’ sake, but what you in self-denial have suffered for God’s sake. Søren Kierkegaard 1847 Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, Hong p. 223-224

  31. ^ Johann Goethe was also very much interested in suicide and wrote about it in his autobiography where he described external methods used for committing suicide Suicide from Goethe's Autobiography
  32. ^ Edna Hong, Forgiveness is a Work as Well as a Grace, 1984 Augsburg Publishing House p. 58.
  33. ^ Søren Kierkegaard 1847 Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, Hong p. 246-247.
  34. ^ Søren Kierkegaard Works of Love, 1847 Hong p. 342-344, 384-385.
  35. ^ Johannes Climacus by Søren Kierkegaard, p. 29
  36. ^ Kierkegaard's Journals Gilleleie, 1 August 1835. Either/Or Vol II pp. 361–362
  37. ^ Johannes Climacus by Søren Kierkegaard, pp. 22–23, 29–30, 32–33, 67–70, 74–76
  38. ^ Point of View by Lowrie, pp. 28–30
  39. ^ Johannes Climacus by Søren Kierkegaard, p. 23
  40. ^ Garff 2005, p. 113 Also available in Encounters With Kierkegaard: A Life As Seen by His Contemporaries, p. 225.
  41. ^ Thomas H Croxall, Glimpses & Impressions of Kierkegaard, 1959, James Nisbet & Co. Ltd. From ‘Recollections From Home’ by Henriette Lund, p. 49
  42. ^ Kierkegaard by Josiah Thompson, Published by Alfred P. Knoff, inc, 1973 pp. 14–15, 43–44 ISBN 0-394-47092-3
  43. ^ Journals & Papers of Søren Kierkegaard IIA 11 August 1838
  44. ^ Hugo Bergmann Dialogical Philosophy from Kierkegaard to Buber p. 2
  45. ^ Given the importance of the journals, references in the form of (Journals, XYZ) are referenced from Dru's 1938 Journals. When known, the exact date is given; otherwise, month and year, or just year is given.
  46. ^ a b c Dru 1938
  47. ^ Conway & Gover 2002, p. 25
  48. ^ Concluding Postscript, Hong trans., p. 247
  49. ^ "The Project Gutenberg eBook of Faust, by AUTHOR.". Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  50. ^ Dru 1938, p. 354
  51. ^ Journals & Papers of Søren Kierkegaard IIA 11 August 1838
  52. ^ a b c d Hannay 2003
  53. ^ See Stages on Life's Way, Hong trans., p. 195ff and 423ff Here he wrote about his conflict with his own guilt. Stages, p. 380-382 Am I guilty, then? Yes. How? By my having begun what I could not carry out. How do you understand it now? Now I understand more clearly why it was impossible for me. What then is my guilt? That I did not understand it sooner. What is your responsibility? Every possible consequence of her life. Why every possible one, for this certainly seems to be exaggeration? Because here it is not a matter of an event but of an act and an ethical responsibility, the consequence of which I do not dare to arm against by being courageous, for courage in this case means opening oneself to them. What can serve as your excuse? ...

    Think of the first word and the hyphen of a compound word, and now suppose that you do not know any more about how it hangs together-what will you say then? You will say that the word is not finished, something is lacking. It is the same with the one who loves. That the relationship came to a break cannot be directly seen; it can be known only in the sense of the past. But the one who loves does not want to know the past, because he abides, and to abide is in the direction of the future. Therefore the one who loves expresses that the relationship, which the other call a break, is a relationship that has not yet finished. But it is still not a break because something is missing. Therefore it depends on how the relationship is viewed, and the one who loves-abides. So it came to a break. It was a quarrel that separated the two; yet one of them made the break, saying, “It is all finished between us.” But the one who loves abides, saying, “It is not all finished between us; we are still in the middle of the sentence; it is only the sentence that is not finished.” Is this not the way it is? What is the difference between a fragment and an unfinished sentence? In order to call something a fragment, one must know that nothing more is coming; If one does not know this, one says that the sentence is not yet finished. When from the angle of the past it is settled that there is no more to come, we say, “It is a fragment”; from the angle of the future, waiting for the next part, we say, “The sentence is not finished; something is still missing.” …. Get rid of the past, drown it in the oblivion of eternity by abiding in love-then the end is the beginning, and there is no break! Soren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, Hong 1995 p. 305-307

  54. ^ The Christianity of us men is, to love God in agreement with other men, to love and be loved by other men, constantly the others, the herd included. The Christianity of the New Testament would be: in case that man were really able to love in such a way that the girl was the only one he loved and one whom he loved with the whole passion of a soul (yet such men as this are no longer to be found), then hating himself and the loved one, to let her go in order to love God.-And it is in view of this I say that such men, men of such quality and caliber, are not born any more. Kierkegaard’s Attack Upon "Christendom" Lowrie 1944 p. 163
  55. ^ Kierkegaard may have been discussing his life and relationships in his book Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits - see Purity of Heart is to Will One Thing p. 160ff
  56. ^ Journals & Papers of Søren Kierkegaard IIA 11 13 May 1839
  57. ^ Kierkegaard 1989
  58. ^ Tristram Hunt, Marx's General: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (Henry Holt and Co., 2009: ISBN 0-8050-8025-2), pp. 45–46.
  59. ^ a b Meister, edited by Chad; Copan, Paul (2012). The Routledge companion to philosophy of religion (Second Edition. ed.). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. ISBN 9780415782951. 
  60. ^ Johannes Climacus: or. De omnibus dubitandum est, and A sermon. Translated, with an assessment by T. H. Croxall 1958 B 4372 .E5 1958
  61. ^ a b The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Religion (Second ed.). Routledge. July 15, 2014. p. 183. ISBN 978-0-415-78295-1. 
  62. ^ a b Kierkegaard's notes on Schelling's work are included in Hong's 1989 translation of the Concept of Irony
  63. ^ Either/Or Vol I Preface Swenson, pp. 3–6
  64. ^ Either/Or Vol I Preface Swenson, pp. 7–8, also see Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Hong trans., 1992, p. 555ff for a relationship of Religiousness A to Religiousness B
  65. ^ Either/Or Part I, Swenson trans., p. 69–73, 143ff, Either/Or Part II, Hong trans., 30–36, 43–48
  66. ^ The Racine Daily Journal, Saturday Afternoon, 11 November 1905, p. 7
  67. ^ See Søren Kierkegaard, Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits 1847 for a more thorough discussion of what he meant by deliberating. Pages 306ff Hong translation
  68. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, Hong 1995 trans., p. 3, 210ff, 301-303
  69. ^ Eighteen Upbuilding Discourses, Søren Kierkegaard 1843–1844, 1990 by Howard V. Hong, Princeton University Press, p. 5
  70. ^ Fear and Trembling, Hong trans., 1983, Translator's introduction, p. xiv
  71. ^ Eighteen Upbuilding Discourses, p. 59-60
  72. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Stages on Life's Way, p. 122-123, Concluding Postscript, pp. 322–323, 242, Works of Love, Hong trans., p. 13.
  73. ^ Eighteen Upbuilding Discourses, Hong trans., p. 295
  74. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Stages on Life's Way, Hong trans., pp. 363–368.
  75. ^ The Concept of Anxiety, p. 7, 20 and Either/Or Part II, Hong trans., p. 342
  76. ^ Either/Or Part II, Hong trans., p. 31
  77. ^ Fear and Trembling, pp. 121–123.
  78. ^ Either/Or Part II, Hong trans., pp. 170–176, The Concept of Anxiety, p. 11-13 including note, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Hong p. 33, 105, 198, 369, 400ff, Mediation looks fairly good on paper. First one assumes the finite, then the infinite, and then says on paper: This must be mediated. An existing person has unquestionably found there the secure foothold outside existence where he can mediate-on paper. p. 419
  79. ^ Johannes Climacus by Søren Kierkegaard, Edited and Introduced by Jane Chamberlain, Translated by T. H. Croxall 2001 pp. 80–81, Either/Or II, pp. 55–57, Repetition, pp. 202–203, Works of Love, 1847 Hong 1995 p. 332-339
  80. ^ See Hegel's Philosophy of Religion, here is a short excerpt that explains the basics. The Philosophy of Religion, excerpts by Edward Caird
  81. ^ See Percy Bysshe Shelley The Necessity of Atheism 1811, 1813
  82. ^ The Concept of Anxiety, pp. 9–13, 20–24. See also Why Study Negative Theology with Simon Oliver YouTube
  83. ^ Soren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, Hong 1995 p. 227-228
  84. ^ Hegel wrote of Schelling's use of subject and object according to the natural sciences

    In one of his earlier writings, the System of Transcendental Idealism; which we shall consider first of all, Schelling represented transcendental philosophy and natural philosophy as the two sides of scientific knowledge. Respecting the nature of the two, he expressly declared himself in this work, where he once more adopts a Fichtian starting-point: “All knowledge rests on the harmony of an objective with a subjective” In the common sense of the words this would be allowed; absolute unity, where the Notion and the reality are undistinguished in the perfected Idea, is the Absolute alone, or God; all else contains an element of discord between the objective and subjective. “We may give the name of nature to the entire objective content of our knowledge the entire subjective content, on the other hand, is called the ego or intelligence.” They are in themselves identical and presupposed as identical. The relation of nature to intelligence is given by Schelling thus: “Now if all knowledge has two poles which mutually presuppose and demand one another, there must be two fundamental sciences, and it must be impossible to start from the one pole without being driven to the other”. Thus nature is impelled to spirit, and spirit to nature; either may be given the first place, and both must come to pass. “If the objective is made the chief” we have the natural sciences as result, and; “the necessary tendency” the end, of all natural science thus is to pass from nature to intelligence. This is the meaning of the effort to connect natural phenomena with theory. The highest perfection of natural science would be the perfect spiritualization of all natural laws into laws of intuitive perception and thought." Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) Lectures on the Philosophy of History Vol 3 1837 translated by ES Haldane and Francis H. Simson) first translated 1896 p. 516-517

  85. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, 1847, Hong p. 306-308; Søren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, Hong trans., pp. 301, 160–161, 225ff.
  86. ^ Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Hong trans., 1992, p. 243
  87. ^ Journals of Søren Kierkegaard VIII1A4
  88. ^ Stages on Life's Way, Hong trans., p. 398
  89. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Stages on Life's Way, Hong trans., pp. 485–486.
  90. ^ a b Journals of Søren Kierkegaard, 1 June 1851.
  91. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Thoughts on Crucial Situations in Human Life, (1845), Swenson trans., pp. 69–70.
  92. ^ Daniel Taylor wrote a book about [www.amazon.com/The-Myth-Certainty-Reflective-Commitment/dp/0830822372 The Myth of Certainty: The Reflective Christian & the Risk of Commitment] 1986, 1992 He says "human beings are explanation generators" and he agrees with Kierkegaard that it would be very strange if Christianity came into the world just to receive and explanation.
  93. ^ Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, p. 465.
  94. ^ The Point of View of My Work as An Author: Lowrie, pp. 142–143
  95. ^ See also Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, Volume I by Johannes Climacus, edited by Søren Kierkegaard, 1846 – Edited and Translated by Howard V. Hong and Edna H. Hong, 1992, Princeton University Press, pp. 251–300 for more on the Pseudonymous authorship.
  96. ^ Concluding Postscript, Hong trans., p. 559, Practice in Christianity p. 91 Hong translation
  97. ^ Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, Hong trans., pp. 496–497, 501–505, 510, 538–539, 556.
  98. ^ Also see Practice in Christianity, Hong p. 201ff
  99. ^ Adorno 1989
  100. ^ a b Morgan 2003
  101. ^ Evans 1996
  102. ^ (POV by Lowrie, pp. 133–134)
  103. ^ (POV by Lowrie, pp. 74–75)
  104. ^ (Either/Or, Vol I by Swenson, pp. 13–14), Søren Kierkegaard, Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, 1847, Hong p. 310-311
  105. ^ Malantschuk, Hong & Hong 2003
  106. ^ The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Religion (Second ed.). Routledge. July 15, 2014. p. 188. ISBN 978-0-415-78295-1. 
  107. ^ Kierkegaard, Søren. Dialectical Result of a Literary Police Action in Essential Kierkegaard.
  108. ^ Kierkegaard 1978, pp. vii–xii
  109. ^ Swensen, David F. "VII". In Web. Søren Kierkegaard. pp. 27–32. 
  110. ^ Point of View pp. 20–24, 41–42
  111. ^ Kierkegaard 1992, p. 251ff
  112. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Journals and papers VIII IA8 1847.
  113. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Journals and Papers VIII IA165 1847.
  114. ^ Journals and Papers of Kierkegaard, Hannay, 1996, p. 254, 264.
  115. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, Hong trans., p. 14 (1847).
  116. ^ Kierkegaard 2001, p. 86
  117. ^ a b c Kierkegaard 2001
  118. ^ Soren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, Hong p. 81-83
  119. ^ The Crowd is Untruth Ccel.org
  120. ^ Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, 13 March 1847 by Søren Kierkegaard, Hong p. 95-96 and 127-129.
  121. ^ This book was rewritten May 14, 1849
  122. ^ Upbuilding (Edifying) Discourses in Various Spirits, Christian Discourses p. 213ff
  123. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, Hong p. 230-247, 248-288
  124. ^ Kierkegaard wrote Works of Love in two series; just as he had his Either/Or and either/or category at the beginning of his writings so he kept to the same category throughout his writings. The first series, ending on page 204 Hong 1995 translation, is parallel to his first writings 1843-1846 and the second is his serious address to single individuals interested in striving to become a Christian. (1847-1855)
  125. ^ Works of Love, Hong p. 209ff
  126. ^ Works of Love, Hong p. 288ff
  127. ^ Christian Discourses, translated by Walter Lowrie 1940, 1961 Author's Preface, p. v and Point of View, Lowrie p. 83-84
  128. ^ POV p. 5-6 Introduction Lowrie
  129. ^ Christian Discourses, April 26, 1848 Lowrie 1940, 1961, See also Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits 1847 Hong 1993 323-325
  130. ^ See Eighteen Upbuilding Discourses
  131. ^ a b (Royal Library of Denmark, 1997)
  132. ^ The Sickness Unto Death, by Anti-Climacus, Edited by Soren Kierkegaard, Copyright 1849 Translation with an Introduction and notes by Alastair Hannay 1989 p. 131
  133. ^ Eighteen Upbuilding Discourses, p. 266-267, Stages on Life's Way, Hong, 122-125, 130, 283-284 Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, Hong, p. 339-340
  134. ^ The Sickness Unto Death, Hannay p. 65ff
  135. ^ Kierkegaard 1991, p. Editor's Preface
  136. ^ Lowrie 1942, pp. 6–9, 24, 30, 40, 49, 74–77, 89
  137. ^ Lowrie 1968
  138. ^ Either/Or Part I Swenson title page
  139. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, Hong trans., pp. 95–96.
  140. ^ The Divine and the Human, by Nicolai Berdyaev 1945 p. 30.
  141. ^ "Divine and the human". Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  142. ^ Attack Upon Christendom by Søren Kierkegaard, 1854–1855, translated by Walter Lowrie, 1944, 1968, Princeton University Press
  143. ^ Attack Upon Christendom Translated by Walter Lowrie 1944, 1968 introduction page xi
  144. ^ For instance in "Hvad Christus dømmer om officiel Christendom." 1855.
  145. ^ Søren Kierkegaard Attack Upon "Christendom", 1854–1855, Lowrie 1944, pp. 37, 6, 31, 27–28.
  146. ^ Kierkegaard 1998b
  147. ^ Kirmmse 2000
  148. ^ Walsh 2009
  149. ^ Kierkegaard 1999b
  150. ^ Journals of Søren Kierkegaard, X6B 371 1853.
  151. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l The Western literary messenger, Volume 13, Issue 1–Volume 14, Issue 5, 1850 p. 182
  152. ^ Evangelical Christendom: Christian Work and the News of the Churches (1855), The Doctrines of Dr Kierkegaard, p. 129
  153. ^ Evangelical Christendom, Volumes 11–12 J.S. Phillips, 1857 Denmark: Remarks on the State of the Danish National Church, by The Rev. Dr. Kalkar, Copenhagen, 1 August 1858. pp. 269–274 quote from pp. 269–270
  154. ^ "Dr. S. Kierkegaard mod Dr. H. Martensen: et indlaeg : Hans Peter Kofoed -Hansen : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive". Archive.org. 2001-03-10. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  155. ^ Martensen 1871
  156. ^ Christian ethics : (General part) Vol. XXXIX, by Hans Martensen, Translated by C. Spence, pp. 206–236
  157. ^ "The Growth of a Soul". Project Gutenberg. Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  158. ^ "Plays by August Strindberg, 1912, Introduction p. 7". Archive.org. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  159. ^ See In God's Way, by Bjornson In God's Way
  160. ^ Kierkegaard's Influence on Literature, Criticism and Art: The Germanophone World Feb 28, 2013, by Jon Stewart p. xii Stewart explains the links further here
  161. ^ Furcht und Zittern 1882 German printing
  162. ^ Stewart, Jon, ed. (2009). Kierkegaard's International Reception: Northern and Western Europe. Ashgate Publishing. p. 388. 
  163. ^ Die krankheit zum tode 1881
  164. ^ Zwölf Reden von Søren Kierkegaard 1886
  165. ^ Stadien auf dem lebenswege 1886
  166. ^ The Philosophy of Religion: On the Basis of Its History, Otto Pfleiderer, 1887 p. 212
  167. ^ The Concise Dictionary of Religious Knowledge and Gazetteer 1889, Kierkegaard, Søren Aaby, Edited by Talbot Wilson Chambers, Frank Hugh Foster, Samuel Macauley Jackson, pp. 473–475
  168. ^ Hall 1983
  169. ^ "Sören Kierkegaard, ein literarisches Charakterbild. Autorisirte deutsche Ausg (1879)". Archive.org. 2001-03-10. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  170. ^ Reminiscences of my childhood and youth (1906), pp. 98–108, 220
  171. ^ George Brandes, Recollections of My Childhood and Youth (1906) p. 214.
  172. ^ 1911 Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica/Søren Kierkegaard
  173. ^ Reminiscences of My Childhood and Youth by George Brandes, September 1906, p. 108
  174. ^ Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche 1st ed. edited, with a preface by Oscar Levy; authorized translation by Anthony M. Ludovici Published 1921 by Doubleday, Page & Co http://www.archive.org/stream/selectedletterso00nietuoft#page/226/mode/2up/search/brandes
  175. ^ "Essays on Scandinavian literature". Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  176. ^ Main Currents in Nineteenth, Century Literature Vol. 2 Georg Brandes, 1906 Introduction p. 11.
  177. ^ Masugata 1999
  178. ^ The American Journal of Theology Published 1908 p. 325
  179. ^ William James, A Pluralistic Universe, 1909 Longmans, Green, and Co. New York see also (James) Essays in Radical Empiricism and Pragmatism.
  180. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, On the Dedication to "That Single Individual"
  181. ^ "A Pluralistic Universe". Archive.org. Retrieved 2013-07-17.  pp. 3–4.
  182. ^ Encyclopaedia of religion and ethics, Vol. 7 (1908) by James Hastings, John Alexander Sebie and Louis H. Gray, p. 696
  183. ^ "Final Unscientific Postscript to the ' Philosophical Crumbs,' " chap. iv. " How can an Eternal Beatitude be based upon an Historical Knowledge?" German translation of the Gesammelte Werke, Jena, 1910, vol. vii. pp. 170, 171)
  184. ^ "Eternal Life: a study of its implications and applications (1913), Friedrich von Hügel, pp. 260–261". Archive.org. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  185. ^ See "Selections from the writings of Kierkegaard" in external links below. Also honorarium for Hollander Utexas.edu
  186. ^ See D. Anthony Storms Commentary: Armed Neutrality http://sorenkierkegaard.org/armed-neutrality.html
  187. ^ Sixteen Logical Aphorisms The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods
  188. ^ "Sixteen Logical Aphorisms". Archive.org. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  189. ^ Scandinavian studies and notes, Volume 6 No. 7: Søren Kierkegaard by David F Swenson, University of Minnesota, Editor A. M. Sturtevant, Feb 1920, p. 41
  190. ^ Disguises of love; psycho-analytical sketches. By Wilhelm Stekel. Authorized translation by Rosalie Gabler. 1922 Chapter V The Collector
  191. ^ The Philosophy Of Karl Jaspers edited by Paul Arthur Schilpp 1957 p. 26 This book mentions Kierkegaard's name very often.
  192. ^ Jaspers 1935
  193. ^ Buch des Richters: Seine Tagebücher 1833–1855, (8 volumes) Hermann Gottsched (1905) the link is below in web
  194. ^ a b Bösl 1997, p. 12
  195. ^ The Philosophical Review, Volume I, Ginn and Company 1892 p. 282-283
  196. ^ "The Philosophical Review". Archive.org. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  197. ^ An independent English translation of selections/excerpts of Kierkegaard appeared in 1923 by Lee Hollander, and published by the University of Texas at Austin.
  198. ^ a b Hannay & Marino 1997
  199. ^ See Michael J. Paulus, Jr. From A Publisher's Point Of View: Charles Williams's Role In Publishing Kierkegaard In English – online --
  200. ^ Kierkegaard studies, with special reference to (a) the Bible (b) our own age. Thomas Henry Croxall, Published: 1948 pp. 16–18.
  201. ^ The Journals Of Kierkegaard (1958) Archive.org
  202. ^ a b "Howard and Edna Hong". Howard V. and Edna H. Hong Kierkegaard Library. St. Olaf College. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  203. ^ "Søren Kierkegaard's Journals and Papers ISBN 978-1-57085-239-8". Intelex Past Masters Online Catalogue. Retrieved 2012-03-11. (Explains the relation between this digital edition and two print editions by the Hongs.)
  204. ^ "National Book Awards – 1968". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  205. ^ See this video about the mission and history of the Søren Kierkegaard research library at St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN
  206. ^ Stewart 2009
  207. ^ Bösl 1997, p. 13
  208. ^ a b Bösl, 1997 & p 14
  209. ^ Bösl 1997, pp. 16–17
  210. ^ Bösl 1997, p. 17
  211. ^ Heidegger, Sein und Zeit, Notes to pp. 190, 235, 338.
  212. ^ Bösl 1997, p. 19
  213. ^ Beck 1928
  214. ^ Wyschogrod 1954
  215. ^ Audio recordings of Kaufmann's lectures Archive.org
  216. ^ Penguin Great Ideas Goodreads
  217. ^ "Karl Barth Prophet Of A New Christianity". Internet Archive. Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  218. ^ Soren Kierkegaard, Works of Love, 1847, Hong p. 1995 p. 274
  219. ^ Two Upbuilding Discourses, 1843 and Four Upbuilding Discourses, 1843 – Søren Kierkegaard Four Upbuilding Discourses, p. 335 and Philosophical Fragments, Swenson trans., p. 47-50
  220. ^ Kingman, G. David, The Religious Educational Values in Karl Barth's Teachings 1934 p. 15-17
  221. ^ "Karl Barth And Christian Unity The Influence Of The Barthian Movement Upon The Churches Of The World". Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  222. ^ Philosophical Fragments Swenson p. 47-48; Practice in Christianity 124ff Hong
  223. ^ Woo, B. Hoon (2014). "Kierkegaard’s Influence on Karl Barth’s Early Theology". Journal of Christian Philosophy 18: 197–245. 
  224. ^ Kangas 1998
  225. ^ McGrath 1993, p. 202
  226. ^ Westphal 1997
  227. ^ Oden 2004
  228. ^ Mackey 1971
  229. ^ Kierkegaard is not an extreme subjectivist; he would not reject the importance of objective truths.
  230. ^ See Faith and the Kierkegaardian Leap in Cambridge Companion to Kierkegaard.
  231. ^ Kierkegaard 1992, pp. 21–57
  232. ^ Kierkegaard 1976, p. 399
  233. ^ Elsewhere, Kierkegaard uses the Faith/Offense dichotomy. In this dichotomy, doubt is the middle ground between faith and taking offense. Offense, in his terminology, describes the threat faith poses to the rational mind. He uses Jesus' words in Matthew 11:6: "And blessed is he, whosoever shall not be offended in me". In Practice in Christianity, Kierkegaard writes: "Just as the concept of "faith" is an altogether distinctively Christian term, so in turn is "offense" an altogether distinctively Christian term relating to faith. The possibility of offense is the crossroad, or it is like standing at the crossroad. From the possibility of offense, one turns either to offense or to faith, but one never comes to faith except from the possibility of offense" (p. 80). In the footnote, he writes, "in the works of some pseudonymous writers it has been pointed out that in modern philosophy there is a confused discussion of doubt where the discussion should have been about despair. Therefore one has been unable to control or govern doubt either in scholarship or in life. "Despair," however, promptly points in the right direction by placing the relation under the rubric of personality (the single individual) and the ethical. But just as there is a confused discussion of "doubt" instead of a discussion of "despair", So also the practice has been to use the category "doubt" where the discussion ought to be about "offense." The relation, the relation of personality to Christianity, is not to doubt or to believe, but to be offended or to believe. All modern philosophy, both ethically, and Christianly, is based upon frivolousness. Instead of deterring and calling people to order by speaking of being despairing and being offended, it has waved to them and invited them to become conceited by doubting and having doubted. Modern philosophy, being abstract, is floating in metaphysical indeterminateness. Instead of explaining this about itself and then directing people (individual persons) to the ethical, the religious, the existential, philosophy has given the appearance that people are able to speculate themselves out of their own skin, as they so very prosaically say, into pure appearance." (Practice in Christianity, trans. Hong, 1991, p. 80.) He writes that the person is either offended that Christ came as a man, and that God is too high to be a lowly man who is actually capable of doing very little to resist. Or Jesus, a man, thought himself too high to consider himself God (blasphemy). Or the historical offense where God a lowly man comes into collision with an established order. Thus, this offensive paradox is highly resistant to rational thought.
  234. ^ Pattison 2005
  235. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Stages on Life's Way (1845) p. 479–480 and Either/Or Part I, p. 5 Swenson.
  236. ^ Søren Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments Vol. I (1846) p. 231–232.
  237. ^ Kierkegaard, Søren. Works of Love. Harper & Row, Publishers. New York, N.Y. 1962. p. 62.
  238. ^ Kierkegaard 1992
  239. ^ a b c Sartre 1946
  240. ^ Dreyfus 1998
  241. ^ Westphal 1996, p. 9
  242. ^ Emmanuel Levinas, Existence and Ethics, (1963) (as cited in Lippitt, 2003, p. 136).
  243. ^ Katz 2001
  244. ^ Hutchens 2004
  245. ^ Sartre 1969, p. 430
  246. ^ Swinburne Richard, The Coherence of Theism.
  247. ^ Fear and Trembling, 1843 – Søren Kierkegaard – Kierkegaard's Writings; 6 – 1983 – Howard V. Hong, pp. 13–14.
  248. ^ Stern 1990
  249. ^ Kosch 1996
  250. ^ Paul Holmer from The Yale Bulletin
  251. ^ "Edifying discourses,: a selection". Retrieved 27 March 2015.  See also Works of Love, Hong 1995 p. 359ff
  252. ^ Weston 1994
  253. ^ Hampson 2001
  254. ^ Unamuno refers to Kierkegaard in his book The Tragic Sense of Life, Part IV, In The Depths of the Abyss Archive.org
  255. ^ a b Creegan 1989
  256. ^ Popper 2002
  257. ^ Walter Kaufmann Introduction to The Present Age, Søren Kierkegaard, Dru 1940, 1962 p. 18-19.
  258. ^ a b Matustik & Westphal 1995
  259. ^ MacIntyre 2001
  260. ^ Rorty 1989
  261. ^ Pyle 1999, pp. 52–53
  262. ^ Andrew Goddard. 2002. Living the Word, Resisting the World: The Life and Thought of Jacques Ellul,Paternoster Press, p. 16.
  263. ^ McGee 2006
  264. ^ Updike 1997
  265. ^ Price, George (1963). 'The Narrow Pass', A Study of Kierkegaard's Concept of Man. McGraw-Hill. p. 11. 
  266. ^ http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/google-doodle-celebrates-danish-philosopher-sren-kierkegaard-8604301.html Google Doodle, 5 May 2013.
  267. ^ Irvine, Andrew. "Existentialism". Western Philosophy Courses Website. Boston University. Retrieved 13 April 2013. 
  268. ^ Crowell, Steven. "Existentialism". Online Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University. Retrieved 13 April 2013. 
  269. ^ Paparella, Emanuel. "Soren Kierkegaard as Father of Existentialism". Magazine. Ovi/Chameleon Project. Retrieved 13 April 2013. 
  270. ^ Dru 1938, p. 224
  271. ^ see An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment? (1784) Upenn.edu
  272. ^ Either/Or I, Swenson trans., p. 23
  273. ^ Arthur Schopenhauer, On Thinking for Oneself, On Thinking For Oneself WikiSource.
  274. ^ Attack Upon Christianity by Søren Kierkegaard, 1853–1854 Translated, with an Introduction and Notes by Walter Lowrie, New Introduction by Howard A. Johnson, Princeton University Press 1944, 1968 pp. 95–96.

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