The Peloponnesian War

Outline of the work

  • Book 1
    • The state of Greece from the earliest times to the commencement of the Peloponnesian War, also known as the Archaeology. 1.1-1.19.
    • Methodological excursus. 1.20-1.23.
    • Causes of the war (433-432 BC) 1.24-1.66.
      • The Affair of Epidamnus. 1.24-1.55.
      • The Affair of Potidaea. 1.56-1.66.
    • Congress of the Peloponnesian League at Lacedaemon. 1.67-1.88
      • The Speech of the Corinthians. 1.68-1.71.
      • The Speech of the Athenian envoys. 1.73-1.78.
      • The Speech of Archidamus. 1.80-1.85.
      • The Speech of Sthenelaidas. 1.86.
    • From the end of the Persian War to the beginning of the Peloponnesian War, also known as the Pentecontaetia. 1.89-1.117.
      • The progress from supremacy to empire.
    • Second congress at Lacedaemon and the Corinthian Speech. 1.119-1.125.
    • Diplomatic maneuvering. 1.126-1.139.
      • Excursus on Cylon. 1.126-1.127.
      • Excursus on Pausanias and Themistocles. 1.128-1.138
    • Pericles' first speech. 1.140-1.145.
  • Book 2 (431-428 BC)
    • War begins with Thebes' attempt to subvert Plataea. 2.1-2.6.
    • Account of the mobilization of and list of the allies of the two combatants. 2.7-2.9.
    • First invasion of Attica. 2.10-2.23.
      • Archidamus leads the Peloponnesian army into Attica. 2.10-2.12.
      • Athenian preparations and abandonment of the countryside. 2.13-2.14.
      • Excursus on Athenian synoikism. 2.15-2.16.
      • Difficult conditions in Athens for refugees from countryside. 2.17.
      • Archidamus ravages Oenoe and Acharnai. 2.18-2.20.
      • Athenian fury and anger at Pericles. 2.21-2.22.
    • Athenian naval counter-attacks along coast of Peloponese and islands. 2.23-2.32.
    • Pericles' Funeral Oration. 2.34-2.46.
    • The plague of Athens. 2.47-2.54.
    • Second invasion of Attica and Athenian naval counter-attacks. 2.55-2.58.
    • Pericles' third speech, defending his position and policy. 2.59-2.64.
    • Thucydides' estimate of Pericles' qualities and the causes for Athens' eventual defeat. 2.65.
    • Diplomacy and skirmishes in Thrace, the islands, and the Northeast. 2.66-2.69.
    • Fall of Potidaea. 2.70.
    • Investment of Plataea. 2.71-2.78.
    • Naval victories of Phormio in the Northeast. 2.80-2.92.
    • Threat of raid on the Piraeus. 2.93-2.94.
    • Thracian campaign in Macedonia under Sitalces. 2.95-2.101.
  • Book 3 (428-425 BC)
    • Annual invasion of Attica. 3.1.
    • Revolt of Mytilene. 3.2-3.50.
      • Speech of Mytilenian envoys to Sparta at Olympia, asking for help. 3.9-3.14.
      • Sparta accepts Lesbos as an ally and prepares to counter the Athenians. 3.15.
      • Mytilene surrenders to Athens despite Spartan support. 3.28.
      • Mytilenian Debate. 3.37-3.50.
    • Fall of Plataea. 3.20-3.24, 3.52-68.
      • Some Plataeans escape. 3.20-3.24.
      • Plataea surrenders. 3.52.
      • Trial and execution of the Plataeans. 3.53-3.68.
        • Speech of Plataeans, 3.53-3.59.
        • Speech of the Thebans. 3.61-3.67.
    • Revolution at Corcyra. 3.70-3.85.
      • Thucydides' account of the evils of civil strife. 3.82-3.84.
    • Athenian campaigns in Sicily. 3.86, 3.90, 3.99, 3.103, 3.115-3.116.
    • Tsunami and inquiry into its causes 3.89.2-5
    • Campaigns of Demosthenes in western Greece. 3.94-3.98, 3.100-3.102, 3.105-3.114.
    • Spartans establish Heraclea in Trachis. 3.92-3.93.
    • Athenians purify Delos. 3.104.
  • Book 4 (425-423 BC)
    • Annual invasion of Attica. 4.2.
    • Athenians en route to Sicily occupy Pylos in the Peloponnese. 4.2-4.6.
      • King Agis of Sparta cuts short the invasion of Attica to return to the Peloponnese. 4.6.
    • Concerted Spartan attack on the Athenian fort at Pylos. 4.8-4.15.
      • The Athenian general Demosthenes coordinates the defense of Pylos and rouses the troops with a speech. 4.9-4.10.
      • The Spartan commander Brasidas distinguishes himself for bravery. 4.11-4.12.
    • The Athenians defeat the Spartan assault on Pylos and cut off a garrison of Spartiates on the adjacent island of Sphacteria. 4.13-4.14.
    • The Spartans, concerned for the men on the island, conclude an immediate armistice and send an embassy to Athens to negotiate peace. 4.13-4.22.
      • The speech of the Spartan ambassadors offers to peace and alliance to Athens in exchange for the return of the men on Sphacteria. 4.17-4.20.
      • The Athenian Cleon, speaking in the Assembly, encourages the Athenians to demand the return of the territories surrendered by Athens at the conclusion of the First Peloponnesian War. 4.21-4.22.
    • Events in Sicily. 4.24-4.25.
    • Siege of the Spartiates on Sphacteria continues without result. 4.26-4.27.
    • Cleon takes command at Pylos. 4.27-4.29.
      • With the siege of Sphacteria yielding no results, the Athenians grow angry at Cleon for encouraging them to reject the Spartan offer of peace. 4.27.1-.4.27.3.
      • Cleon blames Nicias and the generals for ineptitude. 4.27.5.
      • Nicias yields command to Cleon. 4.28.
    • Battle of Sphacteria results in the capture of all the Spartiates trapped there. 4.29-4.41.
    • Nicias leads an Athenian attack on Corinth. 4.42-4.45.
    • End of Corcyraean revolution. 4.46-4.48.
    • Athenians capture Cythera, an island off the Peloponnese, and Thyrea, a town in the Peloponnese. Sparta is hemmed in on all sides and desperate. 4.53-4.57.
    • Sicilian cities make peace in conference at Gela, frustrating Athenian designs on the island. 4.58-65.
      • Speech of Hermocrates at Gela. 4.59-4.64.
    • Athenian attack on Megara. 4.66-4.74.
      • Capture of Nisaea. 4.69.
      • Inconclusive engagements at Megara. 4.73.
      • Megara eludes Athenian capture. 4.74.
    • Invasion of Boeotia. 4.76, 4.89-4.101.2.
      • Athenians occupy temple at Delium. 4.90.
      • Battle of Delium results in Athenian retreat. 4.91-4.96.
      • Boeotians refuse to return Athenian dead until Athenians relinquish the shrine of Delium. 4.97-4.99.
      • Boeotians assault the Athenian in the temple and burn it down. 4.100.
    • Brasidas marches through Thessaly to Thrace and begins to cause Athenian subject cities to revolt. 4.78-4.88.
      • Speech of Brasidas to the Acanthians. 4.85-4.87.
    • Fall of Amphipolis to Brasidas. 4.102-4.108.
    • Continued successes of Brasidas in Thrace. 4.111-4.135.
      • Brasidas secures the revolt of the garrison of Torone. 4.110-4.116.
      • One-year armistice between Athenians and Spartans. 4.117-4.118.
      • Scione revolts from Athens to Brasidas. 4.120-4.123.
      • Truce breaks down. 4.122-4.123.
      • Athenians retake Mende and besiege Scione. 4.129-4.131.
  • Book 5 (422-415 BC)
    • Death of Cleon and Brasidas. 5.10.
    • Peace of Nicias. 5.13-5.24.
    • Feeling against Sparta in the Peloponnese
    • League of the Mantineans, Eleans, Argives, and Athenians. 5.27-5.48.
    • Battle of Mantinea and breaking up of the League. 5.63-5.81.
    • The Melian Dialogue. 5.84-5.113.
    • Fate of Melos. 5.116.
  • Book 6 (415-414 BC)
    • The Sicilian Expedition.6.8-6.52
    • Affair of the Hermae. 6.27-6.29. 6.53.
    • Departure of the expedition to Sicily. 6.30-6.32.
    • Pro-Syracusan Party at Catana. 6.50-6.51. 6.64.
    • Story of Harmodius and Aristogiton. 6.53-6.58.
    • Disgrace of Alcibiades.6.60-6.61.
    • Inaction of the Athenian army.6.63. 6.66.
    • Alcibiades at Sparta. 6.88-6.93.
  • Book 7 (414-413 BC)
    • Arrival of Gylippus at Syracuse. 7.1- 7.3.
    • Fortification of Decelea. 7.19- 7.30.
    • Successes of the Syracusans.
    • Arrival of Demosthenes
    • Defeat of the Athenians at Epipolae. 7.42- 7.59.
    • Folly and obstinacy of Nicias
    • Battles in the Great Harbour
    • Retreat and annihilation of the Athenian army. 7.72- 7.87
  • Book 8 (413-411 BC)
    • Revolt of Ionia
    • Intervention of Persia
    • The war in Ionia
    • Intrigues of Alcibiades
    • Withdrawal of the Persian subsidies
    • Oligarchical coup d'état at Athens
    • Patriotism of the Athenian army at Samos
    • Recall of Alcibiades to Samos
    • Revolt of Euboea and downfall of the Council of the Four Hundred
    • Battle of Cynossema

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