Salman Rushdie Essays

College

Midnight's Children

In Atlas of the European Novel, Franco Moretti argues that “The novel functions as the symbolic form of the nation-state ...and it’s a form that not only does not conceal the nation’s internal divisions, but manages to turn them into a story.” He...

Midnight's Children

Though Salman RushdieÃÂÂs MidnightÃÂÂs Children if full of comic details and humorous anecdotes of Saleem SinaiÃÂÂs family history, the overall tone of the novel is in sharp contrast. Destruction and deception pervade much of the novel, and in the...

Haroun and the Sea of Stories

Salman Rushdie's Haroun and the Sea of Stories is in many ways a simple fairy tale about magical people in a magical land. Rushdie himself admits that he first came up with the basic idea for the novel while telling stories to his son in the...

11th Grade

Haroun and the Sea of Stories

As easy as it is to take advantage of simplicity, some authors understand the depths of the complex world enough to transcend boundaries and speak to both the fruitful guiltlessness of youth and the world’s seeds, hardest to swallow. In 1990,...

College

East, West

The Grammar of the Idols

Salman Rushdie’s “The Prophet’s Hair” reflects on religious practice and worship as a number of people cross paths with a sacred relic that has been stolen from their mosque. A vial, containing a strand of hair from...

College

Shame

Although Salman Rushdie's Shame is considered by some critics a feminist text, others find that Rushdie's novel "reinscribes the patriarchal role of women as passive", as commented by Stephanie Moss, in her essay “The Cream of the Crop: Female...

College

Shame

The first chapter of ‘Shame’ refers to the Garden of Eden, and does so in a manner with implications for the entire narrative. One may interpret the Shakil household as a subversion of Eden. In the Garden of Eden, Eve encounters a crafty serpent...