The Upanishads

References

  1. ^ "Upanishad". Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
  2. ^ a b c Olivelle 1998, p. xxiii.
  3. ^ Samuel 2010.
  4. ^ Max Muller, The Upanishads, Part 1, Oxford University Press, page LXXXVI footnote 1
  5. ^ a b Mahadevan 1956, p. 59.
  6. ^ a b c PT Raju (1985), Structural Depths of Indian Thought, State University of New York Press, ISBN 978-0887061394, pages 35-36
  7. ^ a b c WD Strappini, The Upanishads, p. 258, at Google Books, The Month and Catholic Review, Vol. 23, Issue 42
  8. ^ a b Wendy Doniger (1990), Textual Sources for the Study of Hinduism, 1st Edition, University of Chicago Press, ISBN 978-0226618470, pages 2-3; Quote: "The Upanishads supply the basis of later Hindu philosophy; they alone of the Vedic corpus are widely known and quoted by most well-educated Hindus, and their central ideas have also become a part of the spiritual arsenal of rank-and-file Hindus."
  9. ^ Wiman Dissanayake (1993), Self as Body in Asian Theory and Practice (Editors: Thomas P. Kasulis et al), State University of New York Press, ISBN 978-0791410806, page 39; Quote: "The Upanishads form the foundations of Hindu philosophical thought and the central theme of the Upanishads is the identity of Atman and Brahman, or the inner self and the cosmic self."; Michael McDowell and Nathan Brown (2009), World Religions, Penguin, ISBN 978-1592578467, pages 208-210
  10. ^ Patrick Olivelle (2014), The Early Upanisads, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0195352429, page 3; Quote: "Even though theoretically the whole of vedic corpus is accepted as revealed truth [shruti], in reality it is the Upanishads that have continued to influence the life and thought of the various religious traditions that we have come to call Hindu. Upanishads are the scriptures par excellence of Hinduism".
  11. ^ a b c d Stephen Phillips (2009), Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth: A Brief History and Philosophy, Columbia University Press, ISBN 978-0231144858, Chapter 1
  12. ^ E Easwaran (2007), The Upanishads, ISBN 978-1586380212, pages 298-299
  13. ^ a b Mahadevan 1956, p. 56.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Patrick Olivelle (2014), The Early Upanishads, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0195124354, page 12-14
  15. ^ a b c King & Ācārya 1995, p. 52.
  16. ^ Ranade 1926, p. 12.
  17. ^ a b Varghese 2008, p. 101.
  18. ^ Ranade 1926, p. 205.
  19. ^ Cornille 1992, p. 12.
  20. ^ Phillips 1995, p. 10.
  21. ^ Marbaniang 2010, p. 91.
  22. ^ Clarke, John James (1997). Oriental enlightenment. Routledge. p. 68. ISBN 978-0-415-13376-0. 
  23. ^ Deussen 2010, p. 42.
  24. ^ Neria H. Hebbar, Influence of Upanishads in the West, Boloji.com. Retrieved on: 2012-03-02.
  25. ^ Jones, Constance (2007). Encyclopedia of Hinduism. New York: Infobase Publishing. p. 472. ISBN 0816073368. 
  26. ^ Monier-Williams, p. 201.
  27. ^ Max Muller, Chandogya Upanishad 1.13.4, The Upanishads, Part I, Oxford University Press, page 22
  28. ^ Paul Deussen, Sixty Upanishads of the Veda, Volume 1, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120814684, page 85
  29. ^ Robert Hume, Chandogya Upanishad 1.13.4, Oxford University Press, page 190
  30. ^ Patrick Olivelle (2014), The Early Upanishads, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0195124354, page 185
  31. ^ a b S Radhakrishnan, The Principal Upanishads George Allen & Co., 1951, pages 22, Reprinted as ISBN 978-8172231248
  32. ^ Mahadevan 1956, pp. 59-60.
  33. ^ Ellison Findly (1999), Women and the Arahant Issue in Early Pali Literature, Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, Vol. 15, No. 1, pages 57-76
  34. ^ Paul Deussen, Sixty Upanishads of the Veda, Volume 1, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120814684, pages 301-304
  35. ^ For example, see: Kaushitaki Upanishad Robert Hume (Translator), Oxford University Press, page 306 footnote 2
  36. ^ Max Muller, The Upanishads, p. PR72, at Google Books, Oxford University Press, page LXXII
  37. ^ Patrick Olivelle (1998), Unfaithful Transmitters, Journal of Indian Philosophy, April 1998, Volume 26, Issue 2, pages 173-187; Patrick Olivelle (2014), The Early Upanishads, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0195124354, pages 583-640
  38. ^ WD Whitney, The Upanishads and Their Latest Translation, The American Journal of Philology, Vol. 7, No. 1, pages 1-26; F Rusza (2010), The authorlessness of the philosophical sūtras, Acta Orientalia, Volume 63, Number 4, pages 427-442
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  40. ^ a b c Olivelle 1998, p. 12-13.
  41. ^ Olivelle 1998, p. xxxvi.
  42. ^ Patrick Olivelle, Upanishads, Encyclopedia Britannica
  43. ^ Olivelle 1998, p. xxxvii.
  44. ^ Olivelle 1998, p. xxxviii.
  45. ^ Olivelle 1998, p. xxxix.
  46. ^ a b Deussen 1908, pp. 35–36.
  47. ^ Tripathy 2010, p. 84.
  48. ^ Sen 1937, p. 19.
  49. ^ Sharma 1985, pp. 3, 10–22, 145.
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  57. ^ Heehs 2002, p. 85.
  58. ^ Lal 1992, p. 4090.
  59. ^ Rinehart 2004, p. 17.
  60. ^ Mueller 1859, p. 317.
  61. ^ Singh 2002, pp. 3–4.
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  63. ^ Brooks 1990, pp. 13–14.
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  68. ^ Fields 2001, p. 26.
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  71. ^ Radhakrishnan, Sarvepalli, The Principal Upanishads, Indus / Harper Collins India; 5th edition (1994), ISBN 978-8172231248 
  72. ^ S Radhakrishnan, The Principal Upanishads George Allen & Co., 1951, pages 19-20, Reprinted as ISBN 978-8172231248
  73. ^ S Radhakrishnan, The Principal Upanishads George Allen & Co., 1951, page 24, Reprinted as ISBN 978-8172231248
  74. ^ Paul Deussen, Sixty Upanishads of the Veda, Volume 1, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120814684, pages 114-115 with preface and footnotes; Robert Hume, Chandogya Upanishad 3.17, The Thirteen Principal Upanishads, Oxford University Press, pages 212-213
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  78. ^ Tull, Herman W. The Vedic Origins of Karma: Cosmos as Man in Ancient Indian Myth and Ritual. SUNY Series in Hindu Studies. P. 28
  79. ^ a b c d Mahadevan 1956, p. 57.
  80. ^ Paul Deussen, Sixty Upanishads of the Veda, Volume 1, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120814684, pages 30-42;
  81. ^ a b Max Muller (1962), Manduka Upanishad, in The Upanishads - Part II, Oxford University Press, Reprinted as ISBN 978-0486209937, pages 30-33
  82. ^ Eduard Roer, Mundaka Upanishad Bibliotheca Indica, Vol. XV, No. 41 and 50, Asiatic Society of Bengal, pages 153-154
  83. ^ Paul Deussen, Sixty Upanishads of the Veda, Volume 1, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120814684, pages 331-333
  84. ^ "laid those fires" is a phrase in Vedic literature that implies yajna and related ancient religious rituals; see Maitri Upanishad - Sanskrit Text with English Translation EB Cowell (Translator), Cambridge University, Bibliotheca Indica, First Prapathaka
  85. ^ Max Muller, The Upanishads, Part 2, Maitrayana-Brahmana Upanishad, Oxford University Press, pages 287-288
  86. ^ Hume, Robert Ernest (1921), The Thirteen Principal Upanishads, Oxford University Press, pp. 412–414 
  87. ^ Hume, Robert Ernest (1921), The Thirteen Principal Upanishads, Oxford University Press, pp. 428–429 
  88. ^ Paul Deussen, Sixty Upanishads of the Veda, Volume 1, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120814684, pages 350-351
  89. ^ a b Paul Deussen, The Philosophy of Upanishads at Google Books, University of Kiel, T&T Clark, pages 342-355, 396-412
  90. ^ RC Mishra (2013), Moksha and the Hindu Worldview, Psychology & Developing Societies, Vol. 25, No. 1, pages 21-42
  91. ^ Mark B. Woodhouse (1978), Consciousness and Brahman-Atman, The Monist, Vol. 61, No. 1, Conceptions of the Self: East & West (JANUARY, 1978), pages 109-124
  92. ^ Soul is synonymous with Self in translations of ancient texts of Hindu philosophy
  93. ^ Alice Bailey (1973), The Soul and Its Mechanism, ISBN 978-0853301158, pages 82-83
  94. ^ Eknath Easwaran (2007), The Upanishads, Nilgiri Press, ISBN 978-1586380212, pages 38-39, 318-320
  95. ^ a b John Koller (2012), Shankara, in Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Religion, (Editors: Chad Meister, Paul Copan), Routledge, ISBN 978-0415782944, pages 99-102
  96. ^ Paul Deussen, The Philosophy of the Upanishads at Google Books, Dover Publications, pages 86-111, 182-212
  97. ^ Lanman 1897, p. 790.
  98. ^ Brown 1922, p. 266.
  99. ^ Slater 1897, p. 32.
  100. ^ Varghese 2008, p. 132.
  101. ^ Robinson 1992, p. 51..
  102. ^ Mahadevan 1956, p. 62.
  103. ^ Paul Deussen, The Philosophy of the Upanishads, p. 161, at Google Books, pages 161, 240-254
  104. ^ Ben-Ami Scharfstein (1998), A Comparative History of World Philosophy: From the Upanishads to Kant, State University of New York Press, ISBN 978-0791436844, page 376
  105. ^ H.M. Vroom (1996), No Other Gods, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, ISBN 978-0802840974, page 57
  106. ^ Wendy Doniger O'Flaherty (1986), Dreams, Illusion, and Other Realities, University of Chicago Press, ISBN 978-0226618555, page 119
  107. ^ Archibald Edward Gough (2001), The Philosophy of the Upanishads and Ancient Indian Metaphysics, Routledge, ISBN 978-0415245227, pages 47-48
  108. ^ Teun Goudriaan (2008), Maya: Divine And Human, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120823891, pages 1-17
  109. ^ KN Aiyar (Translator, 1914), Sarvasara Upanishad, in Thirty Minor Upanishads, page 17, OCLC 6347863
  110. ^ Adi Shankara, Commentary on Taittiriya Upanishad at Google Books, SS Sastri (Translator), Harvard University Archives, pages 191-198
  111. ^ Radhakrishnan 1956, p. 272.
  112. ^ Raju 1992, p. 176-177.
  113. ^ a b Raju 1992, p. 177.
  114. ^ Ranade 1926, pp. 179–182.
  115. ^ Mahadevan 1956, p. 63.
  116. ^ a b Encyclopædia Britannica.
  117. ^ Radhakrishnan 1956, p. 273.
  118. ^ a b King 1999, p. 221.
  119. ^ a b Nakamura 2004, p. 31.
  120. ^ King 1999, p. 219.
  121. ^ a b Collins 2000, p. 195.
  122. ^ Radhakrishnan 1956, p. 284.
  123. ^ John Koller (2012), Shankara in Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Religion (Editors: Chad Meister, Paul Copan), Routledge, ISBN 978-0415782944, pages 99-108
  124. ^ Edward Roer (Translator), Shankara's Introduction, p. 3, at Google Books to Brihad Aranyaka Upanishad at pages 3-4; Quote - "(...) Lokayatikas and Bauddhas who assert that the soul does not exist. There are four sects among the followers of Buddha: 1. Madhyamicas who maintain all is void; 2. Yogacharas, who assert except sensation and intelligence all else is void; 3. Sautranticas, who affirm actual existence of external objects no less than of internal sensations; 4. Vaibhashikas, who agree with later (Sautranticas) except that they contend for immediate apprehension of exterior objects through images or forms represented to the intellect."
  125. ^ Edward Roer (Translator), Shankara's Introduction, p. 3, at Google Books to Brihad Aranyaka Upanishad at page 3, OCLC 19373677
  126. ^ KN Jayatilleke (2010), Early Buddhist Theory of Knowledge, ISBN 978-8120806191, pages 246-249, from note 385 onwards; Steven Collins (1994), Religion and Practical Reason (Editors: Frank Reynolds, David Tracy), State Univ of New York Press, ISBN 978-0791422175, page 64; Quote: "Central to Buddhist soteriology is the doctrine of not-self (Pali: anattā, Sanskrit: anātman, the opposed doctrine of ātman is central to Brahmanical thought). Put very briefly, this is the [Buddhist] doctrine that human beings have no soul, no self, no unchanging essence."; Edward Roer (Translator), Shankara's Introduction, p. 2, at Google Books, pages 2-4 Katie Javanaud (2013), Is The Buddhist 'No-Self' Doctrine Compatible With Pursuing Nirvana?, Philosophy Now; John C. Plott et al (2000), Global History of Philosophy: The Axial Age, Volume 1, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-8120801585, page 63, Quote: "The Buddhist schools reject any Ātman concept. As we have already observed, this is the basic and ineradicable distinction between Hinduism and Buddhism".
  127. ^ Panikkar 2001, p. 669.
  128. ^ Panikkar 2001, pp. 725–727.
  129. ^ Panikkar 2001, pp. 747–750.
  130. ^ Panikkar 2001, pp. 697–701.
  131. ^ Olivelle 1998.
  132. ^ Raghavendrachar 1956, p. 322.
  133. ^ a b Chari 1956, p. 305.
  134. ^ a b Stafford Betty (2010), Dvaita, Advaita, and Viśiṣṭādvaita: Contrasting Views of Mokṣa, Asian Philosophy, Vol. 20, No. 2, pages 215-224, doi:10.1080/09552367.2010.484955
  135. ^ Klostermaier 2007, pp. 361–363.
  136. ^ a b Chousalkar, pp. 130-134.
  137. ^ a b Wadia 1956, p. 64-65.
  138. ^ Collins 2000, pp. 197–198.
  139. ^ Urwick 1920.
  140. ^ Keith 2007, pp. 602-603.
  141. ^ RC Mishra (2013), Moksha and the Hindu Worldview, Psychology & Developing Societies, Vol. 25, No. 1, pages 21-42; Chousalkar, Ashok (1986), Social and Political Implications of Concepts Of Justice And Dharma, pages 130-134
  142. ^ a b Sharma 1985, p. 20.
  143. ^ a b Müller 1900, p. lvii.
  144. ^ Muller 1899, p. 204.
  145. ^ Mohammada 2007, p. 54.
  146. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica 1911.
  147. ^ Müller 1900, p. lviii.
  148. ^ See Henry Thomas Colebrooke (1858), Essays on the religion and philosophy of the Hindus. London: Williams and Norgate. In this volume, see chapter 1 (pp. 1–69), On the Vedas, or Sacred Writings of the Hindus, reprinted from Colebrooke's Asiatic Researches, Calcutta: 1805, Vol 8, pp. 369–476. A translation of the Aitareya Upanishad appears in pages 26–30 of this chapter.
  149. ^ Rammohun Roy and the Making of Victorian Britain,By Lynn Zastoupil. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  150. ^ "The Upanishads, Part 1, by Max Müller". 
  151. ^ Paramananda, Swami (1919). The Upanishads (PDF). The Pennsylvania State University. p. 7. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  152. ^ Sadhale 1987.
  153. ^ Sharma 1985, p. 19-20.
  154. ^ Schopenhauer & Payne 2000, p. 395.
  155. ^ Schopenhauer & Payne 2000, p. 397.
  156. ^ a b Singh 1999, p. 456-461.
  157. ^ Versluis 1993, pp. 69, 76, 95. 106–110.
  158. ^ Eliot 1963.
  159. ^ Schrödinger 1992, p. 129.
  160. ^ Easwaran 2007, p. 9.
  161. ^ Juan Mascaró, The Upanishads, Penguin Classics, ISBN 978-0140441635, page 7, 146, cover
  162. ^ a b Paul Deussen, The Philosophy of the Upanishads University of Kiel, T&T Clark, pages 150-179

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