The Crucible

The Crucible and Year of Wonders 12th Grade

Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible and Geraldine Brooks’ novel Year of Wonders are both works that explore the treatment of individuals under oppressive theocratic ruling. Both Miller’s and Brooks’ works are aligned with key themes of superstition, suspicion of witchcraft, and unknown cause of diseases which lead the communities to unravel and fraction in 1660’s Salem and Eyam. Brooks’ novel Year of Wonders exemplifies the manifestation of female power contoured against theocratic standard, creating religious boundaries, whereas Miller illustrates the ability of religion to unite or divide an isolated society against inner turmoil. In both Miller’s play and Brooks' novel, suspicion of witchcraft and unknown cause of the plague sparks mass hysteria in their religious society, causing the people’s faith to sway.

Miller’s play and Brooks’ novel both depict the lack of empowerment women face in their oppressive societies, as their actions are often dictated by their theocratic society. Through the inclusion of Tituba, Miller highlights the injustice that women face despite their continuous plea for innocence. Regarding their condemnation, Miller’s stage directions suggest that superiority of women is inexistent, with Tituba “...

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