The Crucible

Fear is Something to be Feared 10th Grade

Fear is Something to be Feared

The word "fear" can be defined as: a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger or pain. In his play The Crucible, Arthur Miller addresses the fear embedded within Puritan society. According to the Public Broadcasting Service, “Puritans lived in a constant state of spiritual anxiety, searching for signs of God’s favor or anger.” This anxiety propelled the Salem Witch Trials and made them extremely difficult to stop. Therefore, Miller proves that fear had been the Puritans’ fatal flaw.

First and foremost, Tituba starts the chain of accusations due to fear. When Abigail accuses her of calling the Devil, Tituba is backed into a corner. She confesses to witchcraft after Parris threatens, “You will confess yourself or I will take you out and whip you to your death, Tituba!” (Miller 44). Then, Tituba is pressured into accusing others of witchcraft. Hale asks her, “When the Devil comes to you does he ever come-- with another person?” With this question, an accusation could be avoided, but Parris interrupts with, “Who came with him?” implying that Tituba must name somebody (45). Afterwards, Tituba is asked a series of demanding questions such as: “Did you ever see Sarah Good with him? Or Osburn?” and...

Join Now to View Premium Content

GradeSaver provides access to 859 study guide PDFs and quizzes, 6520 literature essays, 1773 sample college application essays, 268 lesson plans, and ad-free surfing in this premium content, “Members Only” section of the site! Membership includes a 10% discount on all editing orders.

Join Now

Already a member? Log in