Medea

References

  1. ^ Gregory 2005, 3.
  2. ^ Helene P. Foley. Reimagining Greek Tragedy on the American Stage. University of California Press, Sep 1, 2012, p. 190
  3. ^ Hall, Edith. 1997. "Introduction" in Medea: Hippolytus ; Electra ; Helen Oxford University Press. pp. ix–xxxv.
  4. ^ See (e.g.) Rabinowitz 1993, 125–54; McDonald 1997, 307; Mastronarde 2002, 26–8; Griffiths 2006, 74–5; Mitchell-Boyask 2008, xx.
  5. ^ KM-awards.umb.edu, Williamson, A. (1990). A woman's place in Euripides' Medea. In Anton Powell (Ed.) Euripides, Women, and Sexuality. pp.16–31.
  6. ^ DuBois 1991, 115–24; Hall 1991 passim; Saïd 2002, 62–100.
  7. ^ Ewans 2007, 55.
  8. ^ This theory of Euripides' invention has gained wide acceptance. See (e.g.) McDermott 1989, 12; Powell 1990, 35; Sommerstein 2002, 16; Griffiths, 2006 81; Ewans 2007, 55.
  9. ^ a b c d e From the programme and publicity materials for this production.
  10. ^ David Littlejohn (26 December 1996). "John Fisher: The Drama of Gender". Wall Street Journal. 
  11. ^ Theatrebabel.co.uk
  12. ^ [1]
  13. ^ paperstrangers.org
  14. ^ Eschen, Nicole (University of California, Los Angeles). "The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea (review)." Theatre Journal. Volume 58, Number 1, March 2006 pp. 103–106 | 10.1353/tj.2006.0070 – At: Project Muse, p. 103
  15. ^ IMDb.com
  16. ^ BBC.co.uk
  17. ^ Classics.mit.edu
  18. ^ Gutenberg.org
  19. ^ Archive.org
  20. ^ Amazon.com
  21. ^ Bacchicstage.wordpress.com
  22. ^ Playscripts.com
  23. ^ http://nypl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/19792753052907_euripides_hecuba,_electra,_medea

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