Dylan Thomas: Poems

Footnotes

Notes
  1. ^ In his 1989 biography of Thomas, Ferris claims that two of Thomas's friends had stated that they met him in London in 1932, though his late 1933 visit to the city is the first for which evidence exists.[24]
  2. ^ Davenport was, for many years, literary editor of The Observer newspaper. "From July to November 1940 Dylan Thomas and his family stayed at 'The Malting House' 78 High Street, Marshfield, near Chippenham in Gloucestershire, with the critic John Davenport and his American painter wife, Clement, who kept an open house for musicians and writers. The composers Lennox Berkeley and Arnold Cooke, the music critic William Glock and writer Antonia White, joined them."[44]
  3. ^ The reason for being graded unsuitable for military service is vague. His mother said it was due to "punctured lungs", while Vernon Watkins believed it was "scarred" lungs. Neither statement is corroborated by Thomas's autopsy, although Milton Helpern found some emphysema probably caused by chain-smoking.[48]
  4. ^ The footage was taken from Riefenstahl's 1935 propaganda film Triumph des Willens.[55]
  5. ^ John Brinnin in his 1956 book, Dylan Thomas in America (p. 104) states that on a visit to Laugharne in 1951 he was shown "more than two hundred separate and distinct versions of the poem (Fern Hill)" by Thomas.
  6. ^ FitzGibbon, in his 1965 biography, lists 39 venues visited in the first U.S. trip, compiled with the help of John Brinnin, but accepts that some locations may have been missed.
  7. ^ The BBC submitted the play posthumously along with a French translation by Jacques-Bernard Brunius.[111]
  8. ^ Although both agree that he left London on 19 October, biographers Ferris and FitzGibbon disagree on his arrival date. Ferris in his 1989 work gives Thomas's arrival in New York as 19 October (p. 329) while FitzGibbon writing in 1965 states 20 October (p. 391).
  9. ^ David N. Thomas (2008) writes: "He knew that he should see a doctor but feared that he would be pronounced unfit and the trip cancelled". Thomas was financially committed to going.
  10. ^ Ruthven Todd states in his letter dated 23 November that the police were called, who then called the ambulance, while Ferris in his 1989 biography writes that Feltenstein was summoned again and called the ambulance. D. N. Thomas concurs that Feltenstein eventually returned at 1 am and summoned the ambulance, although it took nearly another hour to get him admitted to the hospital.
  11. ^ In reply to a student's questions in 1951, Thomas stated: "I do not think that Joyce has had any hand at all in my writing; certainly his Ulysses has not. On the other hand, I cannot deny on the shaping of some of my Portrait stories might owe something to Joyce's stories in the volume, Dubliners. But then Dubliners was a pioneering work in the world of the short story, and no good storywriter since can have failed, in some way, however little, to have benefited by it." FitzGibbon (1965), p. 370
  12. ^ In his notes to page 186, Ferris (1989) states that in a BBC Home Service programme aired in 1950, Poetic License, in which Campbell and Thomas appeared, Thomas said "I won't forgive you for the Swansea's Rimbaud, because you called me that first Roy".
  13. ^ "The Orchard" makes reference to the 'Black Book of Llareggub'. Here Thomas makes links with religion and the mythic Wales of the White Book of Rhydderch and the Black Book of Carmarthen.
  14. ^ Jones notes that in Thomas's early work, such as Eighteen Poems that the iambic foot was the rhythmic basis of his line, while in his later work a count of syllables replaced a count of accents.[166]
References
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