Divine Comedy: Purgatorio

Footnotes

  1. ^ Inferno, Canto 34, lines 121-126, Mandelbuam translation "This was the side on which he fell from Heaven; / for fear of him, the land that once loomed here / made of the sea a veil and rose into / our hemisphere; and that land which appears / upon this side perhaps to flee from him / left here this hollow space and hurried upward."
  2. ^ Purgatorio, Canto I, lines 4–8, Longfellow translation.
  3. ^ a b c Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto VII.
  4. ^ Psalm 114 (Psalm 113 in the Latin Vulgate): "When Israel came out of Egypt" (NIV).
  5. ^ "The Letter to Can Grande," in Literary Criticism of Dante Alighieri, translated and edited by Robert S. Haller (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1973), 99.
  6. ^ Robin Kirkpatrick, Purgatorio, notes on Canto I: "Thus behind all the references that the canto makes to regeneration and rebirth there is the realization that all life and all redemption depends upon Christ's Resurrection from the dead."
  7. ^ Richard H. Lansing and Teodolinda Barolini, The Dante Encyclopedia, Taylor & Francis, 2000, ISBN 0-8153-1659-3, pp. 328–330 (EARTH, GLOBE).
  8. ^ John Brian Harley and David Woodward, The History of Cartography, Humana Press, ISBN 0-226-31633-5, p. 321.
  9. ^ Purgatorio, Canto II, lines 1–9, Mandelbaum translation.
  10. ^ Purgatorio, Canto IV, lines 123–124, Mandelbaum translation.
  11. ^ Purgatorio, Canto V, lines 133–136, Mandelbaum translation.
  12. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto VIII.
  13. ^ a b Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto IX.
  14. ^ Robin Kirkpatrick, Purgatorio, notes on Canto IX.
  15. ^ Purgatorio, Canto IX, lines 113–114, Longfellow translation.
  16. ^ a b c Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, Introduction, pp. 65–67 (Penguin, 1955).
  17. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, Introduction, p. 15 (Penguin, 1955): "Hell is concerned with the fruits, but Purgatory with the roots, of sin."
  18. ^ Robin Kirkpatrick, Purgatorio, Introduction, p. xiv (Penguin, 2007).
  19. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, Introduction, p. 61 (Penguin, 1955): "it is only to be expected that [Purgatory] should be more highly and more serenely organised than Hell."
  20. ^ Luke 1:38, KJV.
  21. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XI, lines 1–21, Mandelbaum translation.
  22. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XI, line 58–59, Mandelbaum translation.
  23. ^ a b c Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XI.
  24. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XI, line 59–60, Mandelbaum translation.
  25. ^ Guy P. Raffa, The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy, University of Chicago Press, 2009, ISBN 0-226-70270-7, p. 164.
  26. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XIII, lines 136–138, Mandelbaum translation.
  27. ^ Matthew 5:3 NIV.
  28. ^ a b c d Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XIII.
  29. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XIV, lines 82–84, Mandelbaum translation.
  30. ^ "Matthew 5:44". Holy Bible, New International Version. Biblica, Inc. 2011 [1973]. 
  31. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XIV, lines 43–54, Mandelbaum translation.
  32. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XIV, line 133, Mandelbaum translation: "Whoever captures me will slaughter me," cf Genesis 4:14 (NIV): "whoever finds me will kill me."
  33. ^ Robin Kirkpatrick, Purgatorio, notes on Canto XV.
  34. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XV, line 21, Dorothy L. Sayers translation, 1955.
  35. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XV, lines 104–105, Mandelbaum translation.
  36. ^ Acts 7:54–60, NIV.
  37. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XV, lines 106–114, Mandelbaum translation.
  38. ^ a b Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XVI.
  39. ^ 'Purgatorio, Canto XVI, lines 1–7, Mandelbaum translation.
  40. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XVII, lines 115–116, Mandelbaum translation.
  41. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XVII, lines 118–120, Mandelbaum translation.
  42. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XVII, lines 121–123, Mandelbaum translation.
  43. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Cantos XVIII and XIX.
  44. ^ Matthew 5:4 NIV.
  45. ^ Psalm 119:25, KJV. In the Vulgate, this is Psalm 118:25.
  46. ^ Robin Kirkpatrick, Purgatorio, notes on Canto XX: "At every point in canto 20, avarice is identified as the driving force in the ambition of the Capetian dynasty."
  47. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XX, lines 79–93, Mandelbaum translation.
  48. ^ a b Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XX.
  49. ^ a b c Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XXI.
  50. ^ a b c d Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XXII.
  51. ^ Matthew 3:4, NIV.
  52. ^ Psalm 51:15, NIV. In the Vulgate, this is Psalm 50:17.
  53. ^ Peter M. J. Stravinskas, Catholic Dictionary, 2nd ed., Our Sunday Visitor Publishing, 2002, p. 415, ISBN 0-87973-390-X.
  54. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIV, line 51, Longfellow translation.
  55. ^ La Vita Nuova, Section XIX, lines 1–8, translated by Charles Eliot Norton.[1]
  56. ^ Summae Deus Clementiae.
  57. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXVI, lines 31–36, Mandelbaum translation.
  58. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XXVII.
  59. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXVII, lines 97–108, Mandelbaum translation.
  60. ^ a b c d Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XXVIII.
  61. ^ Binyon, Lawrence (1978). ""Argument", Canto XXVIII". In Paolo Milano. The portable Dante (Rev. ed.). Harmondsworth: Penguin. ISBN 0140150323. 
  62. ^ Mark Musa, ed. (1995). The portable Dante. New York, N.Y.: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140231145. 
  63. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Hell, notes on Canto II.
  64. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XXX.
  65. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, line 83, Mandelbaum translation.
  66. ^ Revelation 4:4, NIV.
  67. ^ a b c d e f g h Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XXIX.
  68. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, lines 92–105, Mandelbaum translation.
  69. ^ Revelation 4:4:6–8, NIV.
  70. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, line 107, Mandelbaum translation.
  71. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, lines 108–114, Mandelbaum translation.
  72. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, lines 121–129, Mandelbaum translation.
  73. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, line 130, Mandelbaum translation.
  74. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, line 131, Longfellow translation.
  75. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, lines 134–141, Mandelbaum translation.
  76. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, line 142, Mandelbaum translation.
  77. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXIX, lines 143–144, Mandelbaum translation.
  78. ^ John Laskin, The Entrance of Beatrice in Dante's Purgatorio: Revelation, Duality and Identity, Carte Italiane, 1(14), 1994, p. 120: "Virgil slips unnoticed offstage while our attention is cleverly diverted to the visual splendor of the 'cloud of flowers' effect."
  79. ^ Robin Kirkpatrick, Purgatorio, notes on Canto XXX and XXXI.
  80. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXX, lines 49–54, Mandelbaum translation.
  81. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, Introduction, p. 68 (Penguin, 1955).
  82. ^ Dorothy L. Sayers, Purgatory, notes on Canto XXXII.
  83. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXXII, lines 148–153, Mandelbaum translation.
  84. ^ Purgatorio, Canto XXXIII, lines 142–145, Mandelbaum translation.

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