Zora Neale Hurston: Short Stories

References

Notes

  1. ^ Boyd, Valerie (2003). Wrapped in Rainbows: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston. New York: Scribner. p. 17. ISBN 0-684-84230-0. 
  2. ^ Hurston, Lucy Anne (2004). Speak, So You Can Speak Again: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston. New York: Doubleday. p. 5. ISBN 0-385-49375-4. 
  3. ^ Boyd, Valerie (2003). Wrapped in Rainbows: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston. New York: Scribner. pp. 14–17, 439–440. ISBN 978-0-684-84230-1. 
  4. ^ Hurston, Lucy Anne (2004). Speak, So You Can Speak Again: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston. New York: Doubleday. p. 8. ISBN 978-0-385-49375-8. 
  5. ^ Boyd, Rainbows, p. 25.
  6. ^ Sharon L. Jones, A Critical Companion to Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Reference to her Life and Work (New York: Facts on File, 2009), pp. 3–4
  7. ^ Boyd, Rainbows, p. 52.
  8. ^ a b Zora Neale Hurston, Zora Neale Hurston official website, maintained by the Zora Neale Hurston Estate and Harper Collins.
  9. ^ Zora Neale Hurston, Women in History.
  10. ^ Shivonne Foster, Following Footsteps: Zora Neale Hurston, The Hilltop, November 20, 2007.
  11. ^ Jones, Critical Companion, p. 4.
  12. ^ Meyer, Annie Nathan (1951). It's Been Fun: An Autobiography. New York: H. Schuman. 
  13. ^ a b c Cheryl A. Wall, Oxfordreference.com, William L. Andrews, Frances Smith Foster, and Trudier Harris (eds), The Concise Oxford Companion to African American Literature. Oxford University Press, 2001. Oxford Reference Online.
  14. ^ A Century of Barnard Anthropology, The Early Period
  15. ^ a b c Encyclopædia Britannica Online, Hurston, Zora Neale, February 18, 2009.
  16. ^ Scott, Megan K. (March 6, 2011). "Hurston's real home". Florida Today (Melbourne, Florida). pp. 1D. 
  17. ^ "Mule Bone: Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston's Dream Deferred of an African-American Theatre of the Black Word", African American Review, 22 March 2001. Accessed 5 March 2011. "In February 1930, Hurston headed north, settling in Westfield, New Jersey. Godmother Mason (Mrs. Rufus Osgood Mason, their white protector) had selected Westfield, safely removed from the distractions of New York City, as a suitable place for both Hurston and Hughes to work."
  18. ^ Horner, Shirley. "About Books", The New York Times, February 16, 1986. Accessed March 5, 2011. "Dr. Lewis said that his research 'points out that, thanks to Mrs. Mason's generosity, Hughes lived in the early 1930s in a one-family house in Westfield, where his neighbor was another of Harlem's luminaries, Zora Neale Hurston.'"
  19. ^ Porter, Jump at de Sun: The Story of Zora Neale Hurston, p. 66.
  20. ^ Biographical Timeline, Zora Neale Hurston official website.
  21. ^ Boyd, Rainbows, p. 157.
  22. ^ Boyd, Rainbows, pp. 246–47.
  23. ^ Boyd, Rainbows, pp. 375–87.
  24. ^ a b c d Dr. C. Arthur Ellis, "New Florida-based Movie on Ruby McCollum Story Underscores Need for Black History Month", PR Web, 5 January 2011, accessed 18 March 2014
  25. ^ Hurston, Zora Neale. Series of articles covering the trial: Pittsburgh Courier, October 1952-January 1953. Also, "The Life Story Of Ruby McCollum", Pittsburgh Courier, Jan-March 1953
  26. ^ Elizabeth Boyd, "Disquiet", Review of Tammy Evans, The Silencing of Ruby McCollum: Race, Class, and Gender in the South, H-Net Review, July 2008, accessed 18 March 2014
  27. ^ Brotemarkle, Ben (February 4, 2014). "Zora Neale Hurston fond of writing in Eau Gallie cottage". Florida Today (Melbourne, Florida). pp. 9A. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  28. ^ "Charlotte Hunt, renewed interest in author Hurston," Tallahassee Democrat, 25 March 25, 1997
  29. ^ Richard A. Long, "New Negro, The", in William L. Andrews, Frances Smith Foster, and Trudier Harris (eds), The Concise Oxford Companion to African American Literature. Oxford University Press, 2001. Oxford Reference Online. Oxfordreference.com
  30. ^ Brotemarkle, Ben (Fall–Winter 2011). Indian River Journal. Brevard Historical Commission. 
  31. ^ Chuck Jackson, "Waste and Whiteness: Zora Neale Hurston and the Politics of Eugenics", African American Review, 2000, 34(4): 639–660.
  32. ^ Richard Wright, "Between Laughter and Tears", The New Masses, October 5, 1937.
  33. ^ Liz Colville, "Happy Birthday, Richard Wright, Groundbreaking Author of 'Black Boy' and 'Native Son'", Finding Dulcinea, September 4, 2010.
  34. ^ Ward, Jerry Washington Ward and Robert Butler, eds. "Zora Neale Hurston." The Richard Wright encyclopedia. Greenwood Press. 2008.
  35. ^ Olasky, Marvin, "History turned right side up". WORLD magazine. February 13, 2010, p. 22.
  36. ^ "Zora Dust Tracks Heritage Marker 4". Dust Tracks Heritage Trail. St. Lucie County Online. Retrieved 14 June 2014. 
  37. ^ Grosvenor, Vertamae (26 April 2004). "Intersections: Crafting a Voice for Black Culture". National Public Radio. Retrieved 14 June 2014. 
  38. ^ "Archaeology of a Classic: Celebrating Zora Neale Hurston '28". News & Events. Barnard College. December 12, 2012. Retrieved June 14, 2014. 
  39. ^ Graham, Adam (31 March 2010). "Forgotten Florida, Through a Writer’s Eyes". New York Times. Retrieved 14 June 2014. 
  40. ^ Asante, Molefi Kete (2002). 100 Greatest African Americans: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Amherst, New York. Prometheus Books. ISBN 1-57392-963-8.
  41. ^ "Conference Celebrates Legacy of Zora Neale Hurston". Barnard News Center (Barnard College). Archived from the original on 4 June 2004. Retrieved 14 June 2014. 
  42. ^ Walker, Alice. "Finding a World that I Thought Was Lost: Zora Neale Hurston and the People She Looked at Very Hard and Loved Very Much". S&F Online. Barnard College. Retrieved 7 July 2014. 
  43. ^ Anika Myers Palm (January 7, 2014). "Google doodle honors Eatonville's Zora Neale Hurston". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  44. ^ Kerr, Dara (7 Jan 2014). "Google bestows author Zora Neale Hurston her own doodle". CNET. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  45. ^ Staff report (May 25, 2015). "Rick Bragg, Harper Lee will be among Alabama Writers’ Forum’s inductees". Tuscaloosa News. 
  46. ^ McWhorter, John, “Thus Spake Zora", City Journal, Summer 2009.
  47. ^ a b McWhorter, John (2011-01-04) Why Zora Neale Hurston Was a Conservative, The Root
  48. ^ a b David T. Beito and Linda Royster Beito, “Isabel Paterson, Rose Wilder Lane, and Zora Neale Hurston on War, Race, the State, and Liberty", Independent Review 12, Spring 2008.
  49. ^ Freedom From Religion Foundation "Zora Neale Hurston - Freedom From Religion Foundation"
  50. ^ "Seeing the World As It Is," a chapter deleted at the insistence of the original publishers of Hurston's memoir Dust Tracks on a Road, but later included in the Library of America edition edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
  51. ^ Zora Neale Hurston, "Court Order Can't Make the Races Mix", Orlando Sentinel, August 11, 1955.
  52. ^ Reproduction of Hurston's Letter
  53. ^ Turner, In Minor Chord: Three African American Writers, 1971.
  54. ^ H. I. Brock, New York Times Book Review.
  55. ^ 43 (1936).
  56. ^ B. C. McNeil, Journal of Negro History 21(1936) 225.
  57. ^ Jeffrey Anderson, "Voodoo" in Black and White, in Frank & Killbride (eds), Southern Character, 2011.
  58. ^ Robet Hemenway, "Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Biography, pp. 73-78, 96-99.
  59. ^ Carolyn Morrow Long, Spiritual Merchants, p. 123; see also Anderson
  60. ^ Zora Neale Hurston: Jump at the Sun, PBS.
  61. ^ Jones, Sharon Lynette (2009). Critical Companion to Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Reference to Her Life and Work. Infobase Publishing. ISBN 0816068852. Retrieved Nov 2013. 

Citations

  • Abcarian, Richard and Marvin Klotz. "Zora Neale Hurston." In Literature: The Human Experience, 9th edition. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2006, pp. 1562–3.
  • Baym, Nina (ed.), "Zora Neale Hurston." In The Norton Anthology of American Literature, 6th edition, Vol. D. New York, W. W. Norton & Co., 2003, pp. 1506–07.
  • Beito, David T. “Zora Neale Hurston," American Enterprise 6 (September/October 1995), pp. 61–3.
  • Beito, David T. and Beito, Linda Royster, "Isabel Paterson, Rose Wilder Lane, and Zora Neale Hurston on War, Race, the State, and Liberty". Independent Review 12 (Spring 2008).
  • Boyd, Valerie (2003). Wrapped in Rainbows: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston. New York: Scribner. ISBN 0-684-84230-0.
  • Ellis, C. Arthur. Zora Hurston And The Strange Case Of Ruby McCollum, 1st edition. Lutz, FL: Gadfly Publishing, 2009. ISBN 978-0-9820940-0-6.
  • Hemenway, Robert E. Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Biography. Urbana, Ill: University of Illinois Press, 1977. ISBN 0-252-00807-3.
  • Hemenway, Robert E. "Zora Neale Hurston." In Paul Lauter and Richard Yarborough (eds.), The Heath Anthology of American Literature, 5th edition, Vol. D. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 2006, pp. 1577–78.
  • Jones, Sharon L. A Critical Companion to Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Reference to her Life and Work (New York: Facts on File, 2009).
  • Kaplan, Carla (ed.). Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters. New York: Random House, 2003.
  • Kraut, Anthea, "Between Primitivism and Diaspora: The Dance Performances of Josephine Baker, Zora Neale Hurston, and Katherine Dunham", Theatre Journal 55 (2003), pp. 433–50.
  • Menefee, Samuel Pyeatt, "Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)." In Hilda Ellis Davidson and Carmen Blacker (eds.), Women and Tradition: A Neglected Group of Folklorists, Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2000, pp. 157–72.
  • Tucker, Cynthia. "Zora! Celebrated Storyteller Would Have Laughed at Controversy Over Her Origins. She Was Born In Notasulga, Alabama but Eatonville Fla., Claims Her As Its Own"; article documents Kristy Andersen's research into Hurston's birthplace; Atlanta Journal and Constitution, January 22, 1995.
  • Visweswaran, Kamala. Fictions of Feminist Ethnography. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1994. ISBN 0-8166-2336-8
  • Walker, Alice. "In Search of Zora Neale Hurston", Ms. Magazine (March 1975), pp. 74–79, 84–89.

This content is from Wikipedia. GradeSaver is providing this content as a courtesy until we can offer a professionally written study guide by one of our staff editors. We do not consider this content professional or citable. Please use your discretion when relying on it.