The Virgin Suicides


The Virgin Suicides is the 1993 debut novel by American writer Jeffrey Eugenides. The fictional story, which is set in Grosse Pointe, Michigan during the 1970s, centers on one year reflecting around the brief lives of five doomed sisters. The Lisbon girls fascinate their community as their neighbors struggle to find an explanation for their tragic acts. The book's first chapter appeared in Issue No. 117 of The Paris Review (Winter 1990),[1] where it won the 1991 Aga Khan Prize for Fiction.

The novel is atypical in that it was written in first person plural from the perspective of an anonymous group of teenage boys whose lives were forever changed by their passionate and awkward obsession with the Lisbons, style mirroring a Greek chorus. Eugenides told 3am Magazine: "I think that if my name hadn't been Eugenides, people wouldn't have called the narrator a Greek chorus. The traditional Greek chorus stays apart from the action, but the boys in The Virgin Suicides meddle in the action quite a bit, so they really [are] different from a traditional Greek chorus."[2] The narrator(s) rely on relics and interviews gathered in the two decades since the events to construct the tale.

The novel was adapted into a critically acclaimed 1999 film by director Sofia Coppola.

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