The Sun Also Rises

Hemingway's Depiction of Man from The Sun Also Rises

Hemingway's Depiction of a Man in The Sun Also Rises

Common among many of Ernest Hemingway's novels is the concept popularly known as the "Hemingway hero", an ideal character readily accepted by American readers as a "man's man". In The Sun Also Rises, four different men are contrasted and compared in the world of the 1920s as they engage in some form of relationship with Lady Brett Ashley, a near-nymphomaniac Englishwoman who indulges in her passion for sex and control. Brett plans to marry her fiancee for superficial reasons, completely ruins one man emotionally and spiritually, separates from another to preserve the idea of their short-lived affair and to avoid self-destruction, and denies and disgraces the only man whom she loves dearly. All her relationships occur in a period of months, as Brett either accepts or rejects certain values or traits of each man(she usually rejects him completely, though, after she's through with him). Brett, as a dynamic and self-controlled woman, and her four love interests help demonstrate Hemingway's standard definition of a man and/or masculinity. Each man Brett has a relationship within the novel possesses distinct qualities that enable Hemingway to...

Join Now to View Premium Content

GradeSaver provides access to 747 study guide PDFs and quizzes, 4481 literature essays, 1451 sample college application essays, 183 lesson plans, and ad-free surfing in this premium content, “Members Only” section of the site! Membership includes a 10% discount on all editing orders.

Join Now

Already a member? Log in