The Political Writings of John Locke

References

Notes

  1. ^ Locke, John. A Letter Concerning Toleration Routledge, New York, 1991. p. 5 (Introduction)
  2. ^ Delaney, Tim. The march of unreason: science, democracy, and the new fundamentalism Oxford University Press, New York, 2005. p. 18
  3. ^ Godwin, Kenneth et al. School choice tradeoffs: liberty, equity, and diversity University of Texas Press, Austin, 2002. p. 12
  4. ^ Becker, Carl Lotus. The Declaration of Independence: A Study in the History of Political Ideas Harcourt, Brace, 1922. p. 27
  5. ^ Baird, Forrest E; Kaufmann, Walter (2008), From Plato to Derrida, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, pp. 527–29, ISBN 0-13-158591-6 
  6. ^ Broad, CD (2000), Ethics And the History of Philosophy, UK: Routledge, ISBN 0-415-22530-2 
  7. ^ Henning, Basil Duke (1983-01-01), The House of Commons, 1660–1690 1, Google, ISBN 9780436192746, retrieved 28 August 2012 
  8. ^ Laslett 1988, III. Two Treatises of Government and the Revolution of 1688.
  9. ^ Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity, New York: Schocken Books (2006), pp. 260–61
  10. ^ "John Locke", Britannica Online .
  11. ^ Julian Hoppit, A Land of Liberty? England. 1689–1727 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2000), p. 195.
  12. ^ John Kenyon, Revolution Principles. The Politics of Party. 1689–1720 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977), p. 200.
  13. ^ Kenyon, p. 51. Kenyon adds: "Any unbiassed study of the position shows in fact that it was Filmer, not Hobbes, Locke or Sidney, who was the most influential thinker of the age". Kenyon, p. 63.
  14. ^ J. R. Milton, ‘Locke, John (1632–1704)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2008, accessed 12 Sept 2013.
  15. ^ "The Three Greatest Men". Retrieved 13 June 2009. Jefferson identified Bacon, Locke, and Newton as "the three greatest men that have ever lived, without any exception". Their works in the physical and moral sciences were instrumental in Jefferson's education and world view. 
  16. ^ Jefferson, Thomas. "The Letters: 1743–1826 Bacon, Locke, and Newton". Retrieved 13 June 2009. Bacon, Locke and Newton, whose pictures I will trouble you to have copied for me: and as I consider them as the three greatest men that have ever lived, without any exception, and as having laid the foundation of those superstructures which have been raised in the Physical & Moral sciences. 
  17. ^ "Jefferson called Bacon, Newton, and Locke, who had so indelibly shaped his ideas, "my trinity of the three greatest men the world had ever produced"". Explorer. Monticello. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  18. ^ Seigel, Jerrold. The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe since the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2005).
  19. ^ Taylor, Charles (1989), Sources of the Self: The Making of Modern Identity, Cambridge: Harvard University Press .
  20. ^ McGrath, Alister. 1998. Historical Theology, An Introduction to the History of Christian Thought. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers. p. 214–5.
  21. ^ a b c Heussi 1956.
  22. ^ Olmstead 1960, p. 18.
  23. ^ Stahl, H (1957), "Baptisten", Die Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (in German) , 3. Auflage, Band I, col. 863
  24. ^ Olmstead 1960, pp. 102–5.
  25. ^ Olmstead 1960, p. 5.
  26. ^ Bornkamm, Heinrich (1962), "Toleranz. In der Geschichte des Christentums", Die Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (in German) , 3. Auflage, Band VI, col. 942
  27. ^ Wertenbruch, W (1960), "Menschenrechte", Die Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (in German), Tübingen, DE , 3. Auflage, Band IV, col. 869
  28. ^ Cohen, Martin (2008), Philosophical Tales, Blackwell, p. 101 .
  29. ^ Tully, James (2007), An Approach to Political Philosophy: Locke in Contexts, New York: Cambridge University Press, p. 128, ISBN 978-0521436380 
  30. ^ Farr, J (1986), "I. 'So Vile and Miserable an Estate': The Problem of Slavery in Locke's Political Thought", Political Theory 14 (2): 263–89, doi:10.1177/0090591786014002005, JSTOR 191463 
  31. ^ Farr, J. (2008), "Locke, Natural Law, and New World Slavery", Political Theory 36 (4): 495–522, doi:10.1177/0090591708317899 
  32. ^ a b Vaughn, Karen (1978), "John Locke and the Labor Theory of Value" (PDF), Journal of Libertarian Studies 2 (4): 311–326, retrieved 13 August 2011 
  33. ^ Locke, John (1690), Second Treatise of Government (10th ed.), Project Gutenberg, retrieved 25 March 2012 
  34. ^ Zuckert, Michael (1996), The Natural Rights Republic, Notre Dame University Press, pp. 73–85 
  35. ^ Wills, Garry (2002), Inventing America: Jefferson's Declaration of Independence, Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co 
  36. ^ Skinner, Quentin, Visions of Politics, Cambridge .
  37. ^ Locke, John (2009), Two Treatises on Government: A Translation Into Modern English, Industrial Systems Research, p. 81, ISBN 978-0-906321-47-8 
  38. ^ "John Locke: Inequality is inevitable and necessary" (MS PowerPoint). Department of Philosophy The University of Hong Kong. Retrieved 1 September 2011. 
  39. ^ Locke, John. "Second Treatise". The Founders Constitution. §§ 25–51, 123–26. Retrieved 1 September 2011. 
  40. ^ Cliff, Cobb; Foldvary, Fred. "John Locke on Property". The School of Cooperative Individualism. Retrieved 14 October 2012. 
  41. ^ Locke, John (1691), Some Considerations on the consequences of the Lowering of Interest and the Raising of the Value of Money, Marxists .
  42. ^ Locke 1997, p. 307.
  43. ^ Locke 1997, p. 306.
  44. ^ The American International Encyclopedia 9, New York: JJ Little Co, 1954 .
  45. ^ a b Locke 1996, p. 10.
  46. ^ Locke 1997, p. 357.
  47. ^ Forster, Greg (2005), John Locke's politics of moral consensus .
  48. ^ Parker, Kim Ian (2004), The biblical politics of John Locke, Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion .
  49. ^ Locke, John (2002), Nuovo, Victor, ed., Writings on religion, Oxford .
  50. ^ a b Marshall, John (1994), John Locke: resistance, religion and responsibility, Cambridge, p. 426 .
  51. ^ Locke 1987, p. 806.
  52. ^ Waldron 2002, pp. 27, 223.
  53. ^ Waldron 2002, p. 145.
  54. ^ Henrich, D (1960), "Locke, John", Die Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (in German) , 3. Auflage, Band IV, Spalte 426
  55. ^ Waldron 2002, pp. 217 ff.
  56. ^ a b Waldron 2002, p. 13.
  57. ^ Dunn, John (1969), The Political Thought of John Locke: A Historical Account of the Argument of the 'Two Treatises of Government', Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, p. 99, [The Two Treatises of Government are] saturated with Christian assumptions. .
  58. ^ Waldron 2002, pp. 142.
  59. ^ Elze, M (1958), "Grotius, Hugo", Die Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (in German) , 3. Auflage, Band II, col. 1885–1886
  60. ^ Hohlwein, H (1961), "Pufendorf, Samuel Freiherr von", Die Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (in German) , 3. Auflage, Band V, col. 721
  61. ^ Waldron 2002, p. 12.
  62. ^ Waldron 2002, pp. 22–43, 45–46, 101, 153–58, 195, 197.
  63. ^ Waldron 2002, pp. 21–43.
  64. ^ Waldron 2002, p. 136.

Citations

  • Heussi, Karl (1956), Kompendium der Kirchengeschichte (in German), Tübingen, DE , 11. Auflage, Seite 398.
  • Laslett, Peter (1988), Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press  to Locke, John, Two Treatises of Government .
  • Locke, John (1996), Grant, Ruth W; Tarcov, Nathan, eds., Some Thoughts Concerning Education and of the Conduct of the Understanding, Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co, p. 10 .
  • Locke, John (1997), Woolhouse, Roger, ed., An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, New York: Penguin Books .
  • Olmstead, Clifton E (1960), History of Religion in the United States, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall .
  • Waldron, Jeremy (2002), God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations in Locke's Political Thought, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 978-0-521-89057-1 .

Sources

  • Ashcraft, Richard, 1986. Revolutionary Politics & Locke's Two Treatises of Government. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Discusses the relationship between Locke's philosophy and his political activities.
  • Ayers, Michael, 1991. Locke. Epistemology & Ontology Routledge (the standard work on Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding.)
  • Bailyn, Bernard, 1992 (1967). The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Harvard Uni. Press. Discusses the influence of Locke and other thinkers upon the American Revolution and on subsequent American political thought.
  • Cohen, Gerald, 1995. 'Marx and Locke on Land and Labour', in his Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality, Oxford University Press.
  • Cox, Richard, Locke on War and Peace, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1960. A discussion of Locke's theory of international relations.
  • Chappell, Vere, ed., 1994. The Cambridge Companion to Locke. Cambridge U.P. excerpt and text search
  • Dunn, John, 1984. Locke. Oxford Uni. Press. A succinct introduction.
  • ———, 1969. The Political Thought of John Locke: An Historical Account of the Argument of the "Two Treatises of Government". Cambridge Uni. Press. Introduced the interpretation which emphasises the theological element in Locke's political thought.
  • Hudson, Nicholas, "John Locke and the Tradition of Nominalism," in: Nominalism and Literary Discourse, ed. Hugo Keiper, Christoph Bode, and Richard Utz (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1997), pp. 283–99.
  • Mack, Eric (2008). "Locke, John (1632–1704)". In Hamowy, Ronald. The Encyclopedia of Libertarianism. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE; Cato Institute. pp. 305–7. ISBN 978-1-4129-6580-4. LCCN 2008009151. OCLC 750831024. 
  • Macpherson. CB The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1962). Establishes the deep affinity from Hobbes to Harrington, the Levellers, and Locke through to nineteenth-century utilitarianism.
  • Moseley, Alexander (2007), John Locke: Continuum Library of Educational Thought, Continuum, ISBN 0-8264-8405-0 
  • Pangle, Thomas, The Spirit of Modern Republicanism: The Moral Vision of the American Founders and the Philosophy of Locke (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988; paperback ed., 1990), 334 pages. Challenges Dunn's, Tully's, Yolton's, and other conventional readings.
  • Robinson, Dave; Groves, Judy (2003), Introducing Political Philosophy, Icon Books, ISBN 1-84046-450-X 
  • Rousseau, George S. (2004), Nervous Acts: Essays on Literature, Culture and Sensibility, Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 1-4039-3453-3 
  • Strauss, Leo. Natural Right and History, chap. 5B (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1953). Argues from a non-Marxist point of view for a deep affinity between Hobbes and Locke.
  • Strauss, Leo (1958), "Critical Note: Locke's Doctrine of Natural Law", The American Political Science Review 52 (2): 490–501, doi:10.2307/1952329, JSTOR 1952329  A critique of W. von Leyden's edition of Locke's unpublished writings on natural law.
  • Tully, James, 1980. A Discourse on Property : John Locke and his Adversaries. Cambridge Uni. Press
  • Waldron, Jeremy, 2002. God, Locke and Equality. Cambridge Uni. Press.
  • Yolton, John W., ed., 1969. John Locke: Problems and Perspectives. Cambridge Uni. Press.
  • Yolton, John W., ed., 1993. A Locke Dictionary. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Zuckert, Michael, Launching Liberalism: On Lockean Political Philosophy. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.
  • Locke Studies, appearing annually from 2001, formerly The Locke Newsletter (1970–2000), publishes scholarly work on John Locke.

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