The Poems of William Blake

England's Loss of Innocence: An Examination of William Blake's Jerusalem

"Jerusalem," by William Blake, is a contemplative portrayal of England's development during the time period in question. This poem is concerned with the theme of England's loss of innocence; this is important because it shows that development is not, as people often perceive, beneficial for a country; rather, it destroys nature and corrupts humanity. Through the use of descriptive imagery, Blake conveys the "wicked" transformation nature and humans experience due to modernization. The use of anaphora and rhetorical questions both heightens the theme of lost innocence and reinforces the poet's desire to regain this innocence. In addition, Blake's skillful use of figurative language enhances the reader's comprehension of the poem.

Throughout the poem, Blake uses vivid imagery to describe England's loss of innocence due to industrial development. Blake begins the poem by painting images of nature's innocence in the reader's mind, using words such as "mountains green" (2) and "pleasant pasture" (4). He portrays nature as peaceful and beautiful: as it always has been, and as it is always meant to be. In the second stanza, however, the images of nature's...

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