The Canterbury Tales

Practice What You Preach, Pardoner

Practice What You Preach, Pardoner

"The Pardoner's Tale," written by Geoffrey Chaucer, exhibits several qualities of life, as we know it today. In this story, Chaucer writes about a man who preaches to his audience for money. This man begins speaking against all that partake in drinking, blasphemy, and gambling but he admits to committing these sins himself. The pardoner speaks of three men that lost their lives due to greed. This leaves the reader with the knowledge that money is the root of all evil.

The pardoner condemns people who drink and says, "Lust is in all wine and drunkenness" (p 1). Even today, similar quotes can be heard from people across the nation. Many people love to advise others how to live their lives, but they lack the concept themselves. The pardoner is in fact this same way. He thrives to tell others the way of the Lord and condemn them for their sins; however, he is guilty of the same. In fact, just after he explains that swearing is evil, he says "Now for the love of Christ" (p 4). This could be considered a form of swearing. I find it ironic that he concludes his "sermon" by swearing with Christ's name to begin his tale.

Another aspect to consider is the greed of the pardoner. The pardoner seeks a...

Join Now to View Premium Content

GradeSaver provides access to 727 study guide PDFs and quizzes, 4232 literature essays, 1407 sample college application essays, 171 lesson plans, and ad-free surfing in this premium content, “Members Only” section of the site! Membership includes a 10% discount on all editing orders.

Join Now

Already a member? Log in