The Buried Giant

Reception

The novel received mixed reviews.[4]

James Wood writing for The New Yorker criticized the work saying that "Ishiguro is always breaking his own rules, and fudging limited but conveniently lucid recollections."[5]

Alex Preston writing for the Guardian was much more positive, writing: "Focusing on one single reading of its story of mists and monsters, swords and sorcery, reduces it to mere parable; it is much more than that. It is a profound examination of memory and guilt, of the way we recall past trauma en masse. It is also an extraordinarily atmospheric and compulsively readable tale, to be devoured in a single gulp. The Buried Giant is Game of Thrones with a conscience, The Sword in the Stone for the age of the trauma industry, a beautiful, heartbreaking book about the duty to remember and the urge to forget."[6]


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