Tess of the D'Urbervilles

To what extent can Tess of the D'Urbervilles be considered a Greek tragedy? College

Indubitably, Thomas Hardy's 'Tess of the D'Urbervilles' is largely reminiscent of the archetypal Grecian tragedy; evoking an overwhelming sense of pity/catharsis for the female protagonist. However, the constituents of said 'tragedy'; though in essence prevalent throughout, are discordant throughout the majority of Hardy's novel. It is generally stipulated than in order to be defined as a 'Greek Tragedy'; a number of elements must work in unison: the protagonist, though critical to the plot, must remain emotionally detached- the plot propelled by action; irrespective of the thoughts and psychology of the central character and often, as a result, omitting the presence of a consistent narrative. Aristotle stated that tragedy, at its core is 'an imitation, not of men, but of action and life, of happiness and misery'- a plot in which the characters serve to purge the emotions of the spectators and create a focus of empathy, in a tale compelled by nothing more than the misfortune of fate, the cosmos and the Gods.

However, discrepancies arise when looking into the semantics of Hardy's novel- Tess' fate, cannot be prescribed to the fault of the Gods, nor the work of higher beings; Tess possesses no credible form of hamartia, as the...

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