I Am Malala


Yousafzai's memoir I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban, co-written with British journalist Christina Lamb, was published in October 2013 by Little, Brown and Company in the U.S. and by Weidenfeld & Nicolson in the U.K.[122] A reviewer for The Guardian called the book "fearless" and stated that "the haters and conspiracy theorists would do well to read this book", though she criticized "the stiff, know-it-all voice of a foreign correspondent" that is interwoven with Yousafzai's.[123] A reviewer for The Washington Post called the book "riveting" and wrote that "It is difficult to imagine a chronicle of a war more moving, apart from perhaps the diary of Anne Frank."[124] Entertainment Weekly gave the book a "B+", writing that "Malala's bravely eager voice can seem a little thin here, in I Am Malala, likely thanks to her co-writer, but her powerful message remains undiluted."[125] This book is being translated into Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam and Marathi.[126]

The All Pakistan Private Schools Federation announced that the book would be banned in its 152,000 member institutions, stating that it disrespected Islam and could have a "negative" influence.[127] Pakistani investigative editor Ansar Abbasi described her work as "providing her critics something 'concrete' to prove her as an 'agent' of the West against Islam and Pakistan".[128]

A children's edition of the memoir was published in 2014 under the title I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World.[129] The audio book edition, narrated by Neela Vaswani, won the 2015 Grammy Award for Best Children's Album.[130]

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