Christopher Marlowe's Poems

References

  1. ^ "Christopher Marlowe was baptised as 'Marlow,' but he spelled his name 'Marley' in his one known surviving signature." David Kathman. "The Spelling and Pronunciation of Shakespeare's Name: Pronunciation."
  2. ^ Robert A. Logan, Shakespeare's Marlowe (2007) p.4. "During Marlowe's lifetime, the popularity of his plays, Robert Greene's ... remarks ... including the designation "famous", and the many imitations of Tamburlaine suggest that he was for a brief time considered England's foremost dramatist."
  3. ^ Nicholl, Charles (2006). "By my onely meanes sett downe: The Texts of Marlow's Atheism", in Kozuka, Takashi and Mulryne, J.R. Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson: New Directions in Biography. Ashgate Publishing, p. 153.
  4. ^ "Marlowe, Christopher (MRLW580C)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  5. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  6. ^ He died in a deadly brawl.Hutchinson, Robert (2006). Elizabeth's Spy Master: Francis Walsingham and the Secret War that Saved England. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 111. ISBN 0-297-84613-2. 
  7. ^ "See especially the middle section in which the author shows how another Cambridge graduate, Thomas Preston makes his title character express his love in a popular play written around 1560 and compares that "clumsy" line with Doctor Faustus addressing Helen of Troy". Wwnorton.com. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  8. ^ Deats, Sarah Munson (2004). "'Dido Queen of Carthage' and 'The Massacre at Paris'". In Cheney, Patrick. The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. p. 193. ISBN 0-521-82034-0. 
  9. ^ Wilson, Richard (2004). "Tragedy, Patronage and Power". in Cheney, Patrick, 2007, p. 207
  10. ^ Nicholl, Charles (1992). "Libels and Heresies". The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe. London: Jonathan Cape. p. 41. ISBN 0-224-03100-7. 
  11. ^ Hoenselaars, A. J. (1992). "Englishmen abroad 1558–1603". Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries. Madison, New Jersey: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. pp. 78–79. ISBN 0-8386-3431-1. 
  12. ^ This was the title of the (B text) edition published in 1616. The earlier (A text) edition of 1604 simply had The Tragicall History of D. Faustus.
  13. ^ J. A. Downie in his and J. T. Parnell's Constructing Christopher Marlowe (2000) and Constance Kuriyama in her Christopher Marlowe: A Renaissance Life (2002).
  14. ^ a b c d Steane, J.B. (1969). Introduction to Christopher Marlowe: The Complete Plays. Aylesbury, UK: Penguin. ISBN 0-14-043037-7. 
  15. ^ Park Honan, Christopher Marlowe: Poet and Spy, 2005.
  16. ^ This is from a document dated 29 June 1587, from the National Archives – Acts of Privy Council.
  17. ^ Nicholl, Charles (1992). "12". The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe. London: Jonathan Cape. ISBN 0-224-03100-7. 
  18. ^ David Riggs (2004). The World of Christopher Marlowe. Faber. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-571-22159-2. 
  19. ^ He was described by Arbella's guardian, the Countess of Shrewsbury, as having hoped for an annuity of some £40 from Arbella, his being "so much damnified (i.e. having lost this much) by leaving the University.": BL Lansdowne MS. 71, f.3.and Charles Nicholl, The Reckoning (1992), pp. 340–2.
  20. ^ John Baker, letter to Notes and Queries 44.3 (1997), pp. 367–8
  21. ^ Constance Kuriyama, Christopher Marlowe: A Renaissance Life (2002), p. 89. Also in Handover's biography of Arbella, and Nicholl, The Reckoning, p. 342.
  22. ^ Elizabeth I and James VI and I, History in Focus.
  23. ^ Frederick S. Boas, Christopher Marlowe: A biographical and critical study (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953), pp. 101ff.
  24. ^ Constance Kuriyama, Christopher Marlowe: A Renaissance Life (2002), p. xvi.
  25. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  26. ^ Nicholl (1992: 246–248)
  27. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 31 March 2012).
  28. ^ a b For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  29. ^ Mulryne, J. H. "Thomas Kyd." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.
  30. ^ Haynes, Alan. The Elizabethan Secret Service. London: Sutton, 2005.
  31. ^ National Archives, Acts of the Privy Council. Meetings of the Privy Council, including details of those attending, are recorded and minuted for 16, 23, 25, 29 and the morning of May 31st, all of them taking place in the Star Chamber at Westminster. There is no record of any meeting on either the 18th or the 20th of May, however, just a note of the warrant being issued on May 18th and the fact that Marlowe "entered his appearance for his indemnity therein" on the 20th.
  32. ^ Palladis Tamia. London, 1598: 286v-287r.
  33. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 215).
  34. ^ Leslie Hotson, The Death of Christopher Marlowe (1925) p.65
  35. ^ Park Honan, Christopher Marlowe: Poet and Spy (2005) p.325
  36. ^ Hotson (1925) pp.39–40
  37. ^ de Kalb, Eugénie (May 1925). "The Death of Marlowe", in The Times Literary Supplement
  38. ^ Tannenbaum, Samuel (1926). The Assassination of Christopher Marlowe, New York, pp.41–42
  39. ^ Bakeless, John (1942). The Tragicall History of Christopher Marlowe, p.182
  40. ^ Honan (2005), p.354
  41. ^ Nicholl, Charles (2004). "Marlowe, Christopher", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press. online edn, Jan 2008, accessed 24 Aug 2013. "The authenticity of the inquest is not in doubt, but whether it tells the full truth is another matter. The nature of Marlowe's companions raises questions about their reliability as witnesses."
  42. ^ Boas (1953), p.293
  43. ^ Nicholl (2002), p.38
  44. ^ Nicholl (2002), pp.29–30
  45. ^ Kuriyama (2002), p.136
  46. ^ Downie, J. A. "Marlowe, facts and fictions", in Downie, J. A. & Parnell, J. T. (2000). Constructing Christopher Marlowe, pp.26–27
  47. ^ de Kalb (1925)
  48. ^ Tannenbaum (1926)
  49. ^ Nicholl (2002), p.415
  50. ^ Breight, Curtis C. (1996). Surveillance, Militarism and Drama in the Elizabethan Era, p.114
  51. ^ Hammer, Paul E. J. (1996) "A Reckoning Reframed: the 'Murder' of Christopher Marlowe Revisited", in English Literary Renaissance, pp.225–242
  52. ^ Trow, M. J. (2001). Who Killed Kit Marlowe? A contract to murder in Elizabethan England, p.250
  53. ^ Riggs, David (2004). The World of Christopher Marlowe, pp.334–7
  54. ^ Honan (2005), p.348
  55. ^ Honan (2005), p.355. "Useful research has been stimulated by the infinitesimally thin possibility that Marlowe did not die when we think he did. ... History holds its doors open."
  56. ^ Stanley, Thomas (1687). The History of Philosophy 1655–61. quoted in Oxford English Dictionary. 
  57. ^ Riggs, David (2004). Cheney, Patrick, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. p. 38. ISBN 0-521-52734-1. 
  58. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2012).
  59. ^ "The 'Baines Note'". Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  60. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  61. ^ The so-called 'Remembrances' against Richard Cholmeley. For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  62. ^ Waith, Eugene. The Herculean Hero in Marlowe, Chapman, Shakespeare, and Dryden. London: Chatto and Windus, 1962. The idea is commonplace, though by no means universally accepted.
  63. ^ Smith, Bruce R. (March 1995). Homosexual desire in Shakespeare's England. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press. p. 74. ISBN 0-226-76366-8. 
  64. ^ Doctor Faustus and Other Plays, pp. viii–ix
  65. ^ White, Paul Whitfield, ed. (1998). Marlowe, History and Sexuality: New Critical Essays on Christopher Marlowe. New York: AMS Press. 
  66. ^ Hero and Leander, 88 (see Project Gutenberg).
  67. ^ Hero and Leander, 157–192.
  68. ^ Hero and Leander, 192–193.
  69. ^ Simon Barker, Hilary Hinds (2003). The Routledge Anthology of Renaissance Drama. Routledge. Retrieved 2013-02-09. 
  70. ^ Wilson, Richard (2008). "Worthies away: the scene begins to cloud in Shakespeare's Navarre". In Mayer, Jean-Christophe. Representing France and the French in early modern English drama. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press. pp. 95–97. ISBN 0-87413-000-X. 
  71. ^ Kathman, David (2003), "The Question of Authorship", in Wells, Stanley; Orlin, Lena C., Shakespeare: an Oxford Guide, Oxford University Press, pp. 620–32, ISBN 978-0-19-924522-2
  72. ^ Christopher Marlowe – Westminster Abbey
  73. ^ Nigel Reynolds (11 Jul 2002). "Marlowe tribute puts question mark over Shakespeare". The Telegraph
  74. ^ Edmondson 2013, p. 278.
  75. ^ Shakespeare Bites Back – free book pp. 21, 22 & 38.
  76. ^ Edmondson 2013, p. 234.
  77. ^ Nicholl, Charles (2006). "The case for Marlowe", in Wells, Stanley and Edmondson, Paul (eds.) Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. Cambridge University Press, pp.30–32.
  78. ^ Tamburlaine Must Die
  79. ^ The Christopher Marlowe Mysteries at BBC
  80. ^ The Killing.

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