Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Editions

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has undergone numerous editions and been illustrated by numerous artists.[34]

Books

  • 1964, OCLC 9318922 (hardcover, Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., original, first US edition, illustrated by Joseph Schindelman)
  • 1967, ISBN 9783125737600 (hardcover, George Allen & Unwin, original, first UK edition, illustrated by Faith Jaques)
  • 1973, ISBN 0-394-81011-2 (hardcover, revised Oompa Loompa edition)
  • 1976, ISBN 0-87129-220-3 (paperback)
  • 1980, ISBN 0-553-15097-9 (paperback, illustrated by Joseph Schindelman)
  • 1985, ISBN 0-14-031824-0 (paperback, illustrated by Michael Foreman)
  • 1987, ISBN 1-85089-902-9 (hardcover)
  • 1988, ISBN 0-606-04032-3 (prebound)
  • 1992, ISBN 0-89966-904-2 (library binding, reprint)
  • 1995 (illustrated by Quentin Blake)
  • 1998, ISBN 0-14-130115-5 (paperback)
  • 2001, ISBN 0-375-81526-0 (hardcover)
  • 2001, ISBN 0-14-131130-4 (illustrated by Quentin Blake)
  • 2002, ISBN 0-060-51065-X (audio CD read by Eric Idle)
  • 2003, ISBN 0-375-91526-5 (library binding)
  • 2004, ISBN 0-14-240108-0 (paperback)
  • ISBN 0-8488-2241-2 (hardcover)
  • 2011, ISBN 978-0-14-310633-3 (paperback), Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition, cover by Ivan Brunetti
  • 2014, (hardcover, Penguin UK/Modern Classics, 50th anniversary edition)[35]
  • 2014, (hardcover, Penguin UK/Puffin celebratory golden edition, illustrated by Sir Quentin Blake)[35]
  • 2014, (double-cover paperback)[35]

50th anniversary cover

The cover photo of the 50th anniversary edition, published by Penguin Modern Classics for sale in the UK, and aimed at the adult market,[36] has received widespread commentary. Some "absolutely love" the "beautiful" photo of a heavily-made up young girl seated on her mother's knee and wearing a doll-like expression, taken by the photographers Sofia Sanchez and Mauro Mongiello as part of a photo shoot for a 2008 fashion article in a French magazine, for a fashion article titled "Mommie Dearest".[35] But many are critical, even "outraged".[37] In addition to noting that "the image seemingly has little to do with the beloved children’s classic",[38] reviewers and commenters in social media (such as posters on the publisher's Facebook page) have said the art evokes Lolita, Valley of the Dolls, and JonBenet Ramsey; looks like a scene from Toddlers & Tiaras; and is "misleading", "creepy", "sexualized", "grotesque", "misjudged on every level", "distasteful and disrespectful to a gifted author and his work’, "pretentious", "trashy", "outright inappropriate", "terrifying", "really obnoxious", and "weird & kind of paedophilic".[35][39][40][41]

The publisher explained its objective in a blog post accompanying the announcement about the jacket art: "This new image . . . looks at the children at the center of the story, and highlights the way Roald Dahl’s writing manages to embrace both the light and the dark aspects of life".[42] Additionally, Penguin Press's Helen Conford told the Bookseller: "We wanted something that spoke about the other qualities in the book," Penguin Press's Helen Conford told the Bookseller. "It's a children's story that also steps outside children's and people aren't used to seeing Dahl in that way." She continued: "[There is] a lot of ill feeling about it, I think because it's such a treasured book and a book which isn't really a 'crossover book'" As she acknowledged: "People want it to remain as a children's book."

The New Yorker describes what it calls this "strangely but tellingly misbegotten" cover design thusly:"The image is a photograph, taken from a French fashion shoot, of a glassy-eyed, heavily made-up little girl. Behind her sits a mother figure, stiff and coiffed, casting an ominous shadow. The girl, with her long, perfectly waved platinum-blond hair and her pink feather boa, looks like a pretty and inert doll—" The article continues: "And if the Stepford daughter on the cover is meant to remind us of Veruca Salt or Violet Beauregarde, she doesn’t: those badly behaved squirts are bubbling over with rude life." Moreover, writes Talbot, "The Modern Classics cover has not a whiff of this validation of childish imagination; instead, it seems to imply a deviant adult audience."[36]


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