Civil Disobedience

References

  1. ^ Thoreau, H. D. letter to R. W. Emerson, 23 February 1848.
  2. ^ Thoreau, Esq., H.D. (1849). "The Resistance to Civil Government". Æsthetic Papers; Edited by Elizabeth P.Peabody. Boston and New York: The Editor and G.P. Putnam. pp. 189–211. Retrieved February 1, 2018 – via Internet Archive. 
  3. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line
  4. ^ Rosenwald, Lawrence, The Theory, Practice & Influence of Thoreau's Civil Disobedience, quoting Gandhi, M. K., Non-Violent Resistance, pp. 3–4 and 14.
  5. ^ Levin, p. 29.
  6. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  7. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  8. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  9. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  10. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  11. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line
  12. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  13. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  14. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line
  15. ^ Gross, David M. ""Resistance to Civil Government" by H.D. Thoreau ("Civil Disobedience") • TPL". The Picket Line. Retrieved 2018-02-02. 
  16. ^ (1) Berkes, Anna (August 28, 2014). "That government is best which governs least. (Spurious Quotation)". Th. Jefferson Monticello. Charlottesville, Virginia: Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc. (Monticello.org). Archived from the original on May 3, 2017. Retrieved September 22, 2017.  (2) Coates, Robert Eyler (1999). "The Jeffersonian Perspective: Commentary on Today's Social and Political Issues: Based on the Writings of Thomas Jefferson: "That government is best..."". Archived from the original on September 22, 2017. Retrieved September 22, 2017. "That government is best which governs least" is a motto with which Henry David Thoreau opens his pamphlet, Civil Disobedience. It has been attributed to Thomas Jefferson, but no one has ever found it in any of Jefferson's writings. I think an argument can be made that it is not very likely he would ever have made such a statement, because it does not square with his views. ....  (3) Gillin, Joshua (September 21, 2017). "Mike Pence erroneously credits Thomas Jefferson with small government quote". PolitiFact. St. Petersburg, Florida: Tampa Bay Times. Archived from the original on September 22, 2017. Retrieved September 22, 2017. "Thomas Jefferson said, 'Government that governs least governs best.' " — Mike Pence on Thursday, September 21st, 2017 in comments on 'Fox & Friends'  ,
  17. ^ Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations. 1989, Bartleby.com, accessed 20 January 2013
  18. ^ Thoreau, Henry David (1849). Civil Disobedience. first paragraph. 
  19. ^ Gandhi, M. K. "Duty of Disobeying Laws", Indian Opinion, 7 September and 14 September 1907.
  20. ^ Gandhi, M. K. "For Passive Resisters", Indian Opinion, 26 October 1907.
  21. ^ King, M. L. "Morehouse College" (Chapter 2 of The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.)
  22. ^ Buber, Martin, Man's Duty as Man from Thoreau in Our Season University of Massachusetts Press (1962) p. 19.
  23. ^ Maynard, W. Barksdale, Walden Pond: A History. Oxford University Press, 2005 (p. 265).

Peabody, Elizabeth (ed). Aesthetic Papers. G.P. Putnam (New York, 1849). Available at the Internet Archive


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