Christopher Marlowe's Poems

References

  1. ^ Kathman, David. "The Spelling and Pronunciation of Shakespeare's Name: Pronunciation". shakespeareauthorship.com. Retrieved 14 June 2020..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}
  2. ^ Logan, Robert A. (2007). Shakespeare's Marlowe: the influence of Christopher Marlowe on Shakespeare's artistry. Aldershot, England; Burlington, VT: Ashgate. pp. 4–5, 21. ISBN 978-0754657637.
  3. ^ Logan (2007), p. 3, 231-235.
  4. ^ Wilson, Richard (1999). "Introduction". In Wilson, Richard (ed.). Christopher Marlowe. London, New York: Routledge. p. 3.
  5. ^ Wilson (1999), p. 4.
  6. ^ a b For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  7. ^ Erne, Lukas, (2005) "Biography, Mythography, and Criticism: The Life and Works of Christopher Marlowe," Modern Philology, Vol. 103, No. 1, University of Chicago Press (August 2005), pp. 28-50.
  8. ^ a b c d e f Nicholl, Charles (2004). "Marlowe [Marley], Christopher". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (January 2008 ed.). Oxford University Press. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  9. ^ Cowper, Joseph Meadows, ed. (1891). The register booke of the parish of St. George the Martyr, within the citie of Canterburie, of christenings, marriages and burials. 1538-1800. Canterbury: Cross & Jackman. p. 10.
  10. ^ Holland, Peter (2004). "Shakespeare, William". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (January 2013 ed.). Oxford University Press. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  11. ^ "Marlowe, Christopher (MRLW580C)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  12. ^ a b Collinson, Patrick (2004). "Elizabeth I". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (January 2012 ed.). Oxford University Press. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  13. ^ "Act Against Jesuits and Seminarists (1585), 27 Elizabeth, Cap. 2, Documents Illustrative of English Church History". Macmillan (1896). Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  14. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  15. ^ Hutchinson, Robert (2006). Elizabeth's Spy Master: Francis Walsingham and the Secret War that Saved England. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 111. ISBN 978-0-297-84613-0.
  16. ^ "See especially the middle section in which the author shows how another Cambridge graduate, Thomas Preston makes his title character express his love in a popular play written around 1560 and compares that "clumsy" line with Doctor Faustus addressing Helen of Troy". Wwnorton.com. Retrieved 10 December 2011.
  17. ^ Cheney, Patrick (2004). "Chronology". In Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. xvi, xix. ISBN 9780511999055.
  18. ^ a b Cheney (2004), p. xvi. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFCheney2004 (help)
  19. ^ a b c d e f g Cheney (2004), p. xix. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFCheney2004 (help)
  20. ^ Cheney (2004), pp. xvii, xix. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFCheney2004 (help)
  21. ^ a b Cheney (2004), pp. xvi, xix. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFCheney2004 (help)
  22. ^ a b Cheney (2004), pp. xviii, xix. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFCheney2004 (help)
  23. ^ Shea, Christopher D. (24 October 2016). "New Oxford Shakespeare Edition Credits Christopher Marlowe as a Co-author". The New York Times. Retrieved 24 October 2016.
  24. ^ "Christopher Marlowe credited as Shakespeare's co-writer". BBC. 24 October 2016. Retrieved 24 October 2016.
  25. ^ Cheney, Patrick (2004). "Introduction: Marlowe in the twenty-first century". In Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 5. ISBN 9780511999055.
  26. ^ Logan, Terence P., and Denzell S. Smith, eds. The Predecessors of Shakespeare: A Survey and Bibliography of Recent Studies in English Renaissance Drama. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1973.
  27. ^ Maguire, Laurie E. (2004). "Marlovian texts and authorship". In Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Champion of Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 44. ISBN 9780511999055.
  28. ^ Chambers, E. K. (1923). The Elizabethan Stage. Vol. 3. Oxford: Clarendon Press. p. 421.
  29. ^ Brooke, C.F. Tucker (1910). "Tamburlaine". In Brooke, C.F. Tucker (ed.). The Works of Christopher Marlowe (1964 Reprint ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 1–5. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  30. ^ Dyce, Alexander (1850). "Tamburlaine the Great, in Two Parts". In Dyce, Alexander (ed.). The works of Christopher Marlowe, with notes and some account of his life and writings by the Rev. Alexander Dyce, Vol. 1 (1st ed.). London: William Pickering. pp. 3–4.
  31. ^ Dyce (1850), p. 10, Vol. 1.
  32. ^ Marlowe, Christopher (1971). J.W. Harper (ed.). Tamburlaine. London: Ernst Benn Limited.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g Maguire (2004), p. 44.
  34. ^ Chambers (1923), p. 421, Vol. 3.
  35. ^ "See especially the middle section in which the author shows how another Cambridge graduate, Thomas Preston makes his title character express his love in a popular play written around 1560 and compares that "clumsy" line with Doctor Faustus addressing Helen of Troy". Wwnorton.com. Retrieved 10 December 2011.
  36. ^ The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe, Patrick Cheney, editor. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press) 2004, p33. ISBN 0521820340
  37. ^ Healy, Thomas (2004). "Doctor Faustus". In Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 179. ISBN 9780511999055.
  38. ^ a b Healy (2004), pp. xix, 179.
  39. ^ a b Healy (2004), p. 179.
  40. ^ This was the title of the (B text) edition published in 1616. The earlier (A text) edition of 1604 simply had The Tragicall History of D. Faustus.
  41. ^ "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus" (‘A’ Text) and ('B' Text) in David Bevington and Eric Rasmussen (eds.), Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus and Other Plays, World’s Classics (Oxford University Press, 1995).
  42. ^ Cartelli, Thomas (2004). "Edward II". In Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 158–159. ISBN 9780511999055.
  43. ^ Cartelli (2004), pp. 158-159.
  44. ^ Brooke, C.F. Tucker (1910). "The Massacre at Paris". In Brooke, C.F. Tucker (ed.). The Works of Christopher Marlowe. Oxford: Clarendon Press. p. 440.
  45. ^ a b Brooke (1910), p. 440. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFBrooke1910 (help)
  46. ^ Dyce (1850), pp. 293-294, Vol. 3.
  47. ^ Deats, Sarah Munson (2004). "'Dido Queen of Carthage' and 'The Massacre at Paris'". In Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. p. 193. ISBN 978-0-521-82034-9.
  48. ^ a b Deats (2004), p. 199.
  49. ^ Nicholl, Charles (1992). "Libels and Heresies". The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe. London: Jonathan Cape. p. 41. ISBN 978-0-224-03100-4.
  50. ^ Hoenselaars, A. J. (1992). "Englishmen abroad 1558–1603". Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries. Madison, New Jersey: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. pp. 78–79. ISBN 978-0-8386-3431-8.
  51. ^ Wilson, Richard (2004). "Tragedy, Patronage and Power" in Cheney, Patrick, 2007, p. 207
  52. ^ From Henslowe's Diary. Cambridge Companion, 2004, p199.
  53. ^ Maguire (2004), pp. 44-45.
  54. ^ Kuriyama, Constance (2002). Christopher Marlowe: A Renaissance Life. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. ISBN 0801439787.
  55. ^ Downie, J. A. and J. T. Parnell. Constructing Christopher Marlowe (2000)
  56. ^ a b c d Steane, J. B. (1969). Introduction to Christopher Marlowe: The Complete Plays. Aylesbury, UK: Penguin. ISBN 978-0-14-043037-0.
  57. ^ Honan, Park (2005). Christopher Marlowe: Poet and Spy. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0198186959.
  58. ^ Honan (2005).
  59. ^ Nicholl, Charles (1992). "12". The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe. London: Jonathan Cape. ISBN 978-0-224-03100-4.
  60. ^ This is from a document dated 29 June 1587, from the National Archives – Acts of Privy Council.
  61. ^ Nicholl (1992). sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFNicholl1992 (help)
  62. ^ David Riggs (2004). The World of Christopher Marlowe. Faber. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-571-22159-2.
  63. ^ He was described by Arbella's guardian, the Countess of Shrewsbury, as having hoped for an annuity of some £40 from Arbella, his being "so much damnified (i.e. having lost this much) by leaving the University.": British Library Lansdowne MS. 71, f.3. and Nicholl, (1992), pp. 340–2.
  64. ^ John Baker, letter to Notes and Queries 44.3 (1997), pp. 367–8
  65. ^ Kuriyama (2002), p. 89.
  66. ^ Nicholl (1992), p. 342. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFNicholl1992 (help)
  67. ^ Handover, P. M. (1957). Arbella Stuart, royal lady of Hardwick and cousin to King James. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode.
  68. ^ Elizabeth I and James VI and I, History in Focus.
  69. ^ Frederick S. Boas, Christopher Marlowe: A biographical and critical study (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953), pp. 101ff.
  70. ^ Kuriyama (2002), p. xvi.
  71. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  72. ^ Nicholl (1992), pp. 246-248. sfnp error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFNicholl1992 (help)
  73. ^ Stanley, Thomas (1687). The History of Philosophy 1655–61. quoted in Oxford English Dictionary.
  74. ^ Riggs, David (5 January 2005). The World of Christopher Marlowe (1 ed.). Henry Holt and Co. p. 294. ISBN 978-0805077551. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  75. ^ Riggs, David (2004). Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-521-52734-7.
  76. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2012).
  77. ^ "The 'Baines Note'". Retrieved 30 April 2015.
  78. ^ a b For a full transcript of Kyd's letter, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 30 April 2015).
  79. ^ The so-called 'Remembrances' against Richard Cholmeley. For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page. (Retrieved 30 April 2015)
  80. ^ Waith, Eugene. The Herculean Hero in Marlowe, Chapman, Shakespeare, and Dryden. Chatto and Windus, London, 1962. The idea is commonplace, though by no means universally accepted.
  81. ^ Smith, Bruce R. (March 1995). Homosexual desire in Shakespeare's England. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press. p. 74. ISBN 978-0-226-76366-8.
  82. ^ Doctor Faustus and Other Plays, pp. viii–ix
  83. ^ White, Paul Whitfield, ed. (1998). Marlowe, History and Sexuality: New Critical Essays on Christopher Marlowe. New York: AMS Press. ISBN 978-0-404-62335-7.
  84. ^ Hero and Leander, 88 (see Project Gutenberg).
  85. ^ Hero and Leander, 157–192.
  86. ^ Hero and Leander, 192–193.
  87. ^ Simon Barker, Hilary Hinds (2003). The Routledge Anthology of Renaissance Drama. Routledge. ISBN 9780415187343. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  88. ^ Marlowe, Christopher; Forker, Charles R. (15 October 1995). Edward the Second. Manchester University Press. ISBN 9780719030895.
  89. ^ For a full transcript, see Peter Farey's Marlowe page (Retrieved 31 March 2012).
  90. ^ J. R. Mulryne states in his ODNB article that the document was identified in the 20th century as transcripts from John Proctour's The Fall of the Late Arian (1549).
  91. ^ a b Mulryne, J. R. "Thomas Kyd." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.
  92. ^ Haynes, Alan. The Elizabethan Secret Service. London: Sutton, 2005.
  93. ^ National Archives, Acts of the Privy Council. Meetings of the Privy Council, including details of those attending, are recorded and minuted for 16, 23, 25, 29 and the morning of 31 May, all of them taking place in the Star Chamber at Westminster. There is no record of any meeting on either 18 or 20 May, however, just a note of the warrant being issued on 18 May and the fact that Marlowe "entered his appearance for his indemnity therein" on the 20th.
  94. ^ Palladis Tamia. London, 1598: 286v-287r.
  95. ^ Leslie Hotson, The Death of Christopher Marlowe (1925) p.65
  96. ^ Honan (2005), p. 325.
  97. ^ Wilson, Scott. Resting Places: The Burial Sites of More Than 14,000 Famous Persons, 3d ed.: 2 (Kindle Location 30125). McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. Kindle Edition
  98. ^ Hotson (1925) pp.39–40
  99. ^ de Kalb, Eugénie (May 1925). "The Death of Marlowe", in The Times Literary Supplement
  100. ^ Tannenbaum, Samuel (1926). The Assassination of Christopher Marlowe, New York, pp.41–42
  101. ^ Bakeless, John (1942). The Tragicall History of Christopher Marlowe, p.182
  102. ^ Honan (2005), p. 354.
  103. ^ Nicholl, Charles (2004). "Marlowe [Marley], Christopher", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press. online edn, January 2008. Retrieved 24 August 2013. "The authenticity of the inquest is not in doubt, but whether it tells the full truth is another matter. The nature of Marlowe's companions raises questions about their reliability as witnesses."
  104. ^ Boas (1953), p.293
  105. ^ Nicholl (2002), p.38
  106. ^ Nicholl (2002), pp.29–30
  107. ^ Kuriyama (2002), p.136
  108. ^ Downie, J. A. "Marlowe, facts and fictions", in Downie, J. A. & Parnell, J. T. (2000). Constructing Christopher Marlowe, pp.26–27
  109. ^ de Kalb (1925)
  110. ^ Tannenbaum (1926)
  111. ^ Nicholl (2002), p.415
  112. ^ Breight, Curtis C. (1996). Surveillance, Militarism and Drama in the Elizabethan Era, p.114
  113. ^ Hammer, Paul E. J. (1996) "A Reckoning Reframed: the 'Murder' of Christopher Marlowe Revisited", in English Literary Renaissance, pp.225–242
  114. ^ Trow, M. J. (2001). Who Killed Kit Marlowe? A contract to murder in Elizabethan England, p.250
  115. ^ Riggs, David (2004). The World of Christopher Marlowe, pp.334–7
  116. ^ Honan (2005), p. 348.
  117. ^ Honan (2005), p. 355.
  118. ^ Peter Alexander ed., William Shakespeare: The Complete Works (London 1962) p. 273
  119. ^ Wilson, Richard (2008). "Worthies away: the scene begins to cloud in Shakespeare's Navarre". In Mayer, Jean-Christophe (ed.). Representing France and the French in early modern English drama. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press. pp. 95–97. ISBN 978-0-87413-000-3.
  120. ^ Kathman, David (2003), "The Question of Authorship", in Wells, Stanley; Orlin, Lena C., Shakespeare: an Oxford Guide, Oxford University Press, pp. 620–32, ISBN 978-0-19-924522-2
  121. ^ Rogers, Frederick (1913). Labour, Life and Literature. London: Smith, Elder & Co. pp. 160–167.
  122. ^ Christopher Marlowe – Westminster Abbey
  123. ^ Nigel Reynolds (11 July 2002). "Marlowe tribute puts question mark over Shakespeare". The Telegraph.
  124. ^ Shakespeare Bites Back – free book pp. 21, 22 & 38.
  125. ^ Edmondson 2013, pp. 278, 234. harvnb error: no target: CITEREFEdmondson2013 (help)
  126. ^ "The Marlowe". marlowetheatre.com. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  127. ^ Potter, Lois (2004). "Marlowe in theatre and film". In Cheney, Patrick (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 277. ISBN 9780511999055.
  128. ^ "Dido, Queen of Carthage". rsc.org.uk. Royal Shakespeare Company. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  129. ^ a b "Tamburlaine-Professional Productions". Centre for the Study of the Renaissance. University of Warwick. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  130. ^ Sher, Anthony (7 October 2014). "Antony Sher: I never saw myself as a classical actor; Monologue: actors on acting Royal Shakespeare Company". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 14 June 2020.
  131. ^ Clapp, Susannah (2 September 2018). "The week in theatre: Tamburlaine; Pericles – reviews". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  132. ^ "The Jew of Malta - Professional Productions". warwick.ac.uk. Centre for the Study of the Renaissance, University of Warwick. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  133. ^ Godwin, Laura Grace (Fall 2016). "Merchant and Jew at the Royal Shakespeare Company". Shakespeare Bulletin. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 13 (3): 511–520. doi:10.1353/shb.2016.0043. S2CID 193444360. Retrieved 14 June 2020.
  134. ^ Clapp, Susannah (5 April 2015). "The Jew of Malta review – prescient, reverberating, immediate". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 14 June 2020.
  135. ^ a b c d e Potter (2004), p. 273.
  136. ^ Potter (2004), p. 265.
  137. ^ a b "Doctor Faustus - Professional Productions". warwick.ac.uk. Centre for the Study of the Renaissance, University of Warwick. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  138. ^ Wiegand, Chris (12 February 2016). "Your own personal demon: Maria Aberg on her Doctor Faustus double act". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  139. ^ Billington, Michael (25 March 2009). "Dido, Queen of Carthage; Christopher Marlowe". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  140. ^ Lunney, Ruth (2015). "Dido, Queen of Carthage". In Logan, Robert A.; Deats, Sara Munson (eds.). Christopher Marlowe at 450 (1st ed.). London: Routledge. p. 41. ISBN 9781315571959.
  141. ^ Billington, Michael (5 September 2013). "Edward II – review". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  142. ^ Billington, Michael (22 June 2003). "Dido, Queen of Carthage; Shakespeare's Globe". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  143. ^ Mahoney, Elizabeth (18 August 2003). "Edward II; Shakespeare's Globe". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  144. ^ a b c d e f g h Potter (2004), pp. 262-281.
  145. ^ "Edward II, Comments and Reviews". Ian McKellen. Sir Ian McKellen. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  146. ^ a b Potter (2004), p. 275.
  147. ^ a b Potter (2004), p. 276.
  148. ^ a b c Potter (2004), p. 272.
  149. ^ Lukowski, Andrzej (26 April 2016). "Doctor Faustus". timeout.com. Time Out. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  150. ^ "Doctor Faustus". thisistheatre.com. thisistheatre.com. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  151. ^ "March 2020 Onwards; Shakespeare in Performance; Current and Forthcoming Renaissance Drama Productions in the UK". touchstone.bham.ac.uk. Touchstone: Co-operation and Parnership Among UK Shakespeare Collections; University of Birmingham. Retrieved 15 June 2020.

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