Call of the Wild

What does London meam when he writes about the "paradox of living"? What are his examples of this?

What does London meam when he writes about the "paradox of living"? What are his examples of this? Chapter 3

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Despite the enormous hardships of living in the far north, Buck feels more alive than he ever felt in his pampered life in California. It is a paradox that pain and struggle for survival could be a cathartic moment in Buck's life. Although Buck was beaten close to death, he was able to define himself as the alpha dog of the pack: he belonged in the wilderness of the North.

The paradox that Mr. London is describing is that we are most alive when we are most in danger, so very close to dying. It most telling that Mr. London uses Buck's pursuit of the snowshoe hare, which is, in a sense, a white rabbit. To pursue, and kill this rabbit, as part of his struggle to live. This touches on another keypoint of the paradox in that all humans need to kill in order to live. Some us of us may delude ourselves by eating only plants. That is still killing plants and those plants are resources that other creatures could use to survive. Just take a look at how much rainforest is cut down for soy farming. Another aspect of the paradox, is this pursuit, into the unknown yet familiarly different world that Buck has entered. A distinct parralel to Alice's chase after the white rabbit into wonderland and the journey of self discovery. This is perhaps the more intellectual paradox of life is that we don't really know ourselves or what we are capable of until we leave our comfortable life and take on some hardship.