Uncle Tom's Cabin

In the book Uncle Tom's Cabin what evidence is there that Mr. St. Clare, despite his good intentions, cannot view Tom as an individual?

In chapter 14 of the book Uncle Tom's Cabin what evidence is there that Mr. St. Clare, despite his good intentions, cannot view Tom as an individual?

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Despite his good intentions Mr. St. Claire still views Tom as a lesser person, using stereotypes to define Tom before he knows him:

"Well, I think I shall put you in coachy, on condition that you won't be drunk more than once a week, unless in cases of emergency, Tom."

Tom looked surprised, and rather hurt, and said, "I never drink, Mas'r."

"I've heard that story before, Tom; but then we'll see. (chapter 14)