Twelfth Night

Notes

  1. ^ Use of spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in the First Folio:"Twelfe Night, Or what you will"
  2. ^ "Shakespeare, having tackled the theatrical problems of providing Twelfth Night with effective musical interludes, found his attitude toward his material changed. An episodic story became in his mind a thing of dreams and themes." Thomson, Peter. Shakespeare's Theater. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983, p. 94. ISBN 0-710-09480-9.
  3. ^ Torbarina, J. "The Setting of Shakespeare's Plays." Studia Romanica et Anglica Zagrabiensia, 17–18 (1964).
  4. ^ Donno, Elizabeth Story, editor. Twelfth Night, or, What You Will. Updated ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, p. 7.
  5. ^ Caldecott, Henry Stratford (1896). Our English Homer, or, The Bacon-Shakespeare Controversy: A Lecture. Johannesburg: Johannesburg Times. p. 9. OCLC 83492745. 
  6. ^ a b Halliday, F. E. (1964). A Shakespeare Companion 1564–1964 (First ed.). Harmondsworth: Penguin. pp. 71, 505. OCLC 69117982. 
  7. ^ Laroque, François. Shakespeare's Festive World: Elizabethan Seasonal Entertainment and the Professional Stage. Cambridge University Press, 1991, p. 153.
  8. ^ Laroque, p. 227.
  9. ^ Laroque, p. 254.
  10. ^ Clayton, Thomas. "Shakespeare at The Guthrie: Twelfth Night" in Shakespeare Quarterly 36.3 (Autumn 1985), p. 354.
  11. ^ a b Shakespeare, William; Stephen Greenblatt; Walter Cohen; Jean E. Howard; Katharine Eisaman Maus; Andrew Gurr (1997). The Norton Shakespeare (First ed.). New York: W.W. Norton. pp. 40, 1090. ISBN 0-393-97087-6. 
  12. ^ Hodgdon, Barbara: "Sexual Disguise and the Theatre of Gender" in The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Comedy, edited by Alexander Leggatt. Cambridge University Press, 2002, p. 186.
  13. ^ Lothian and Craik, p. 30.
  14. ^ Righter, Anne. Shakespeare and the Idea of the Play. Chatto & Windus, 1962, p. 130.
  15. ^ Righter, p. 136.
  16. ^ Righter, p. 133.
  17. ^ Weimann, Robert. Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition in the Theater: Studies in the Social Dimension of Dramatic Form and Function, page 41. The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1978.
  18. ^ Weimann, p. 43.
  19. ^ Hobgood, Allison P. (Fall 2006). "Twelfth Night's "Notorious Abuse" of Malvolio: Shame, Humorality, and Early Modern Spectatorship" (PDF). Shakespeare Bulletin. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  20. ^ Griffin, Alice (1966). The Sources of Ten Shakespearean Plays (First ed.). New York: T.Y. Crowell. OCLC 350534. 
  21. ^ Shakespeare, William; Smith, Bruce R. (2001). Twelfth Night: Texts and Contexts. Boston: Bedford/St Martin's. p. 2. ISBN 0-312-20219-9. 
  22. ^ Charles, Casey. "Gender Trouble in Twelfth Night." Theatre Journal. Vol. 49, No. 2 (1997): 123.
  23. ^ a b Charles, p. 124.
  24. ^ Smith, Bruce R. "Introduction." Twelfth Night. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2001.
  25. ^ Hotson, Leslie (1954). The First Night of Twelfth Night (First ed.). New York: Macmillan. OCLC 353282. 
  26. ^ The production was extensively reviewed by Thomas Clayton, "Shakespeare at The Guthrie: Twelfth Night" for Shakespeare Quarterly 36.3 (Autumn 1985:353–359).
  27. ^ Gay, Penny. As She Likes It: Shakespeare's Unruly Heroines. London: Routledge, 1994, p. 15.
  28. ^ Gay, Penny: pp. 18-20.
  29. ^ Gay, Penny, p. 30.
  30. ^ Gay, Penny, p. 34.
  31. ^ Costa, Maddy (20 October 2009). "Malvolio – the killjoy the stars love to play". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  32. ^ Costa, Maddy (1 October 2012). "Stephen Fry's Twelfth Night: this all-male affair is no one-man show". The Guardian. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  33. ^ Examined, for example, in Jami Ake, "Glimpsing a 'Lesbian' Poetics in Twelfth Night", Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900, 43.2, Tudor and Stuart Drama (Spring 2003) pp 375–94.
  34. ^ "Epiphany (Star, 1999) Epiphany (Bow Shakespeare Series #8)". takarazuka-revue.info. Retrieved 11 December 2010. 
  35. ^ "Twelfth Night: Or What You Will (1996)". Foster on Film. Retrieved 11 December 2010. 
  36. ^ Vahimagi, Tise; British Film Institute (1994). British Television: An Illustrated Guide. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 8. ISBN 0-19-818336-4. 

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