T.S. Eliot: Prose

Notes

  1. ^ Bush, Ronald. "T.S. Eliot's Life and Career." American National Biography. Ed. John A Garraty and Mark C. Carnes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.[1]
  2. ^ Bloom, Harold (2003). T.S. Eliot. Bloom's Biocritiques. Broomall: Chelsea House Publishing. p. 30. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Thomas Stearns Eliot, Encyclopaedia Britannica, accessed 7 November 2009.
  4. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Literature 1948". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "The Nobel Prize in Literature 1948 – T.S. Eliot", Nobelprize.org, taken from Frenz, Horst (ed). Nobel Lectures, Literature 1901–1967. Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1969, accessed 6 March 2012.
  6. ^ Ronald Bush, T.S. Eliot: the modernist in history, (New York, 1991), p. 72
  7. ^ Worthen, John (2009). T.S. Eliot: A Short Biography. London: Haus Publishing. p. 9. 
  8. ^ Sencourt, Robert (1971). T.S. Eliot, A Memoir. London: Garnstone Limited. p. 18. 
  9. ^ Letter to Marquis Childs quoted in St. Louis Post Dispatch (15 October 1930) and in the address "American Literature and the American Language" delivered at Washington University in St. Louis (9 June 1953), published in Washington University Studies, New Series: Literature and Language, no. 23 (St. Louis: Washington University Press, 1953), p. 6.
  10. ^ Hall, Donald. The Art of Poetry No. 1, The Paris Review, Issue 21, Spring–Summer 1959, accessed 29 November 2011.
  11. ^ a b c Gallup, Donald. T. S. Eliot: A Bibliography (A Revised and Extended Edition), Harcourt, Brace & World, New York, 1969.
  12. ^ Eliot, T.S. Poems Written in Early Youth, John Davy Hayward, ed. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 1967
  13. ^ Narita, Tatsushi, "The Young T. S. Eliot and Alien Cultures: His Philippine Interactions", The Review of English Studies, New Series, vol. 45, no. 180, 1994, pp. 523–525.
  14. ^ Narita, Tatsush, T. S. Eliot, The World Fair of St. Louis and "Autonomy", Nagoya: Kougaku Shuppan (2013), pp.9–104.
  15. ^ Bush, Ronald, "The Presence of the Past: Ethnographic Thinking/ Literary Politics", in Prehistories of the Future, ed. Elzar Barkan and Ronald Bush, Stanford University Press,(1995), pp. 3–5; 25–31.
  16. ^ Marsh, Alex and Elizabeth Daumer, "Pound and T. S. Eliot", American Literary Scholarship, 2005, 182.
  17. ^ [2]
  18. ^ a b Kermode, Frank. "Introduction" to The Waste Land and Other Poems, Penguin Classics, 2003.
  19. ^ Perl, Jeffry M. and Andrew P. Tuck. "The Hidden Advantage of Tradition: On the Significance of T. S. Eliot's Indic Studies", Philosophy East & West V. 35 No. 2, April 1985, pp. 116–131.
  20. ^ a b Seymour-Jones, Carole. Painted Shadow: The Life of Vivienne Eliot, First Wife of T. S. Eliot, Knopf Publishing Group, p. 1.
  21. ^ Worthen, John (2009). T.S. Eliot: A Short Biography. London: Haus Publishing. pp. 34–36. 
  22. ^ For a reading of the dissertation, see Brazeal, Gregory (Fall 2007). "The Alleged Pragmatism of T.S. Eliot". Philosophy & Literature 31 (1): 248–264. Retrieved 17 January 2011. 
  23. ^ T. S. Eliot at the Institute for Advanced Study The Institute Letter, Spring 2007
  24. ^ Eliot, Thomas Stearns IAS profile
  25. ^ Eliot, T. S. The Letters of T. S. Eliot, Volume 1, 1898–1922. p. 75.
  26. ^ Richardson, John, Sacred Monsters, Sacred Masters. Random House, 2001, p. 20.
  27. ^ Seymour-Jones, Carole. Painted Shadow: A Life of Vivienne Eliot. Knopf Publishing Group, 2001, p. 17.
  28. ^ The Letters of T.S. Eliot: Volume 1, 1898–1922. London: Faber and Faber. 1988. p. 533. 
  29. ^ Eliot, T. S. The Letters of T. S. Eliot, Volume 1, 1898–1922. London: Faber and Faber. 1988. p. xvii.
  30. ^ Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce. pp. 492–495
  31. ^ Kojecky, Roger (1972). T. S. Eliot's Social Criticism. Faber & Faber. p. 55. ISBN 0571096921. 
  32. ^ a b c d T.S. Eliot. Voices and Visions Series. New York Center of Visual History: PBS, 1988.[3]
  33. ^ plaque on interior wall of Saint Stephen's
  34. ^ obituary notice in Church and King, Vol. XVII, No. 4, 28 February 1965,−− p. 3.
  35. ^ Specific quote is "The general point of view [of the essays] may be described as classicist in literature, royalist in politics, and anglo-catholic [sic] in religion", in preface by T.S. Eliot to For Lancelot Andrewes: essays on style and order, (1929)
  36. ^ Books: Royalist, Classicist, Anglo-Catholic, 25 May 1936, Time
  37. ^ Eliot, T.S. (1986). On Poetry and Poets. London: Faber & Faber. p. 209. ISBN 0571089836. 
  38. ^ Radio interview on 26 September 1959, Nordwestdeutscher Rundfunk, as cited in Wilson, Colin (1988). Beyond the Occult. London: Bantam Press. pp. 335–336. 
  39. ^ Seymour-Jones, Carole. Painted Shadow: A Life of Vivienne Eliot. Constable 2001, p. 561.
  40. ^ "Vivienne suffered terribly each month from what we now would recognize as PMS.""A Tribute to Dr. Katharina Dalton". Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
  41. ^ Ronald Bush T. S. Eliot: The Modernist in History 1991 – Page 11 "Mary Trevelyan, then aged forty, was less important for Eliot's writing. Where Emily Hale and Vivienne were part of Eliot's private phantasmagoria, Mary Trevelyan played her part in what was essentially a public friendship. She was Eliot's escort for nearly twenty years until his second marriage in 1957. A brainy woman, with the bracing organizational energy of a Florence Nightingale, she propped the outer structure of Eliot's life, but for him she, too, represented .."
  42. ^ Leon Surette The Modern Dilemma: Wallace Stevens, T.S. Eliot, and Humanism 2008 Page 343 "Later, sensible, efficient Mary Trevelyan served her long stint as support during the years of penitence. For her their friendship was a commitment; for Eliot quite peripheral. His passion for immortality was so commanding that it allowed him to ..."
  43. ^ Santwana Haldar T.S. Eliot – A Twenty-first Century View 2005 Page xv "Details of Eliot's friendship with Emily Hale, who was very close to him in his Boston days and with Mary Trevelyan, who wanted to marry him and left a riveting memoir of Eliot's most inscrutable years of fame, shed new light on this period in ..."
  44. ^ Gordon, Lyndall. T. S. Eliot: An Imperfect Life. Norton 1998, p. 455.
  45. ^ Gordon, Jane. The University of Verse, The New York Times, 16 October 2005; Wesleyan University Press timeline, 1957
  46. ^ Lawless, Jill (11 November 2012). "T.S. Eliot's widow Valerie Eliot dies at 86". Associated Press via Yahoo News. Retrieved 12 November 2012. 
  47. ^ http://www.tabathayeatts.com/Poets%20Corner.jpg
  48. ^ "T. S. Eliot Blue Plaque". openplaques.org. Retrieved 23 November 2013. 
  49. ^ Eliot, T. S. "Letter to J. H. Woods, April 21, 1919." The Letters of T. S. Eliot, vol. I. Valerie Eliot, ed. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1988, p. 285.
  50. ^ "''T. S. Eliot: The Harvard Advocate Poems''. Retrieved 5 February 2007". Theworld.com. Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
  51. ^ Hall, Donald (Spring–Summer 1959). "The Art of Poetry No. 1" (PDF). The Paris Review. Retrieved 7 November 2009. 
  52. ^ Waugh, Arthur. The New Poetry, Quarterly Review, October 1916, citing the Times Literary Supplement 21 June 1917, no. 805, 299; Wagner, Erica (2001) "An eruption of fury", The Guardian, letters to the editor, 4 September 2001. Wagner omits the word "very" from the quote.
  53. ^ Miller, James H., Jr. (2005). T. S. Eliot: the making of an American poet, 1888–1922. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 387–388. ISBN 0-271-02681-2. 
  54. ^ The letters of T. S. Eliot, Vol. 1, p. 596
  55. ^ MacCabe, Colin. T. S. Eliot. Tavistock: Northcote House, 2006.
  56. ^ Wilson, Edmund. "Review of Ash Wednesday", New Republic, 20 August 1930.
  57. ^ See, for instance, the biographically oriented work of one of Eliot's editors and major critics, Ronald Schuchard.
  58. ^ Grant, Michael (ed.). T. S. Eliot: the Critical Heritage. Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982.
  59. ^ " 'Ulysses', Order, and Myth", Selected Essays T. S. Eliot (orig 1923).
  60. ^ Untermeyer, Louis. Modern American Poetry. Hartcourt Brace, 1950, pp. 395–396.
  61. ^ Eliot, T. S. The Use of Poetry and the Use of Criticism, Harvard University Press, 1933 (penultimate paragraph)
  62. ^ Darlington, W. A. (2004). "Henry Sherek". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 27 July 2014. 
  63. ^ a b "Tradition and the Individual Talent. Eliot, T. S. 1920. ''The Sacred Wood''". Bartleby.com. Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
  64. ^ quoted in Roger Kimball, "A Craving for Reality", The New Criterion Vol. 18, 1999
  65. ^ Dirk Weidmann: And I Tiresias have foresuffered all.... In: LITERATURA 51 (3), 2009, pp.98–108.
  66. ^ "Hamlet and His Problems. Eliot, T. S. 1920. ''The Sacred Wood''". Bartleby.com. Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
  67. ^ Burt, Steven and Lewin, Jennifer. "Poetry and the New Criticism". A Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry, Neil Roberts, ed. Malden, Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishers, 2001. p. 154
  68. ^ "Project MUSE". Muse.jhu.edu. Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
  69. ^ A. E. Malloch, "The Unified Sensibility and Metaphysical Poetry", College English, Vol. 15, No. 2 (Nov. 1953), pp. 95–101
  70. ^ "Eliot, T. S. 1922. ''The Waste Land''". Bartleby.com. Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
  71. ^ "T. S. Eliot :: The Waste Land and criticism – ''Britannica Online Encyclopedia''". Britannica.com. 4 January 1965. Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
  72. ^ a b c d Bush, Ronald. "T.S. Eliot". American National Biography. Ed. John A Garraty and Mark C. Carnes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.[4].
  73. ^ a b Wilson, Edmund. "The Poetry of Drouth". The Dial 73. December 1922. 611-16.
  74. ^ Powell, Charles. "So Much Waste Paper". Manchester Guardian. 31 October 1923.
  75. ^ Time. 3 March 1923, 12.
  76. ^ Ransom, John Crowe. "Waste Lands". New York Evening Post Literary Review. 14 July 1923. 825-26.
  77. ^ Seldes, Gilbert. "T. S. Eliot". Nation. 6 December 1922. 614–616.
  78. ^ Ozick, Cynthia. T.S. Eliot at 100. The New Yorker: November 20, 1989
  79. ^ Bloom, Harold. The Western Canon: Books and Schools of the Ages. NY: Riverhead, 1995.
  80. ^ Eds. Stephen Greenblatt, et al. The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 2. "T.S. Eliot". W.W. Norton & Co.: NY, NY, 2000.
  81. ^ The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 2. "T.S. Eliot". W.W. Norton & Co.: NY, NY, 2000.
  82. ^ Gross, John. Was T.S. Eliot a Scoundrel?, Commentary magazine, November 1996
  83. ^ Anthony, Julius. T.S. Eliot, Anti-Semitism, and Literary Form. Cambridge University Press, 1996 ISBN 0-521-58673-9
  84. ^ Eliot, T.S. "Gerontion". Collected Poems. Harcourt, 1963.
  85. ^ Eliot, T.S. "Burbank with a Baedeker: Bleistein with a Cigar". Collected Poems. Harcourt, 1963.
  86. ^ Bloom, Harold (7 May 2010). "The Jewish Question: British Anti-Semitism". The New York Times. Retrieved 9 April 2012. 
  87. ^ a b c d e Dean, Paul (April 2007). "Academimic: on Craig Raine's T.S. Eliot". The New Criterion. Retrieved 7 June 2011. 
  88. ^ London Review of Books, 9 May 1996 [5]
  89. ^ Kirk, Russell. "T. S. Eliot on Literary Morals: On T. S. Eliot's After Strange Gods", Touchstone Magazine, volume 10, issue 4, Fall 1997.
  90. ^ T.S. Eliot, The Rock (London: Faber and Faber, 1934), 44.
  91. ^ The Rock, 44
  92. ^ Eagleton, Terry. "Raine's Sterile Thunder". The Prospect Magazine. 22 March 2007.[6]
  93. ^ Irish Poetry
  94. ^ [Brathwaite, Kamau, "History of the Voice", Roots, Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 1993, p. 286.]
  95. ^ T.S. Eliot
  96. ^ When Joyce met TS Eliot
  97. ^ "Poet T.S. Eliot Dies in London". This Day in History. Retrieved 16 February 2012. 
  98. ^ The three short stories published in the Smith Academy Record (1905) have never been recollected in any form and have virtually been neglected.
  99. ^ As for a comparative study of this short story and Rudyard Kipling's "The Man Who Would Be King", see Tatsushi Narita, T. S. Eliot and his Youth as "A Literary Columbus" (Nagoya: Kougaku Shuppan, 2011), 21–30.

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