Tristram Shandy

References

  1. ^ Hnatko, Eugene (1966). "Tristram Shandy's Wit". The Journal of English and Germanic Philology 65 (1): 47–64. 
  2. ^ a b Griffin, Robert J. (1961). "Tristram Shandy and Language". College English 23 (2): 108–12. doi:10.2307/372959. 
  3. ^ Schopenhauer, Arthur. "The Art of Literature". The Essays of Arthur Schopenahuer. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Petrie (1970) pp.261–6
  5. ^ Ferriar (1798), chapter 6, p.181
  6. ^ see Gargantua: Chap 2.XIX: Trismegistus was to be Tristram's name but Susannah couldn't remember it long enough.
  7. ^ "Laurence Sterne". The Guardian. 22 July 2008. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  8. ^ Ferriar (1798), chapter 2, pp.24, 28–31
  9. ^ Tristram Shandy, Book 3, chapters 38 and 41
  10. ^ Rabelais, Book 1, ch. 40 Pourquoi les moines sont rejetés du monde et pourquoi certains ont le nez plus grand que les autres
  11. ^ a b c d Ferriar (1798), chapter 3, pp.55–9, 64
  12. ^ Walsh, Marcus (2009). "Scriblerian satire, A Political Romance, the ‘Rabelaisian Fragment’, and the origins of Tristram Shandy". Cambridge University Press. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  13. ^ Chapter 1.X: Rosinante, "Hero's Horse" and "Don Quixote's horse"
  14. ^ Jefferson (1951)
  15. ^ Cartwright, David (2005) E. Historical dictionary of Schopenhauer's philosophy p.162
  16. ^ a b c Peter Jan de Voogd, John Neubauer (2004) The reception of Laurence Sterne in Europe pp.80–1
  17. ^ "Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved on 20 October 2007.
  18. ^ "Laurence Sterne Author Bookshelf – Random House – Books – Audiobooks – Ebooks". Random House. Retrieved 21 October 2012. 
  19. ^ Bridgwater, Patrick (1988) Arthur Schopenhauer's English schooling, pp. 352–3
  20. ^ Francis Wheen (July 2001). Karl Marx: A Life. W. W. Norton & Company. pp. 25–. ISBN 978-0-393-32157-9. Retrieved 8 March 2011. 
  21. ^ Tom Keymer (13 April 2006). Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy: A Casebook. Oxford University Press. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-19-517560-8. Retrieved 16 July 2012. Then in early March...Sterne himself went to London where he was immediately greeted as the literary event of the season. For the next eleven weeks he was passed from hand to hand through the upper echelons of London Society. Befriended by Garrick, painted by Joshua Reynolds, patronized by William Warburton and Lord Bathurst..., interviewed by James Boswell, put in communication with William Hogarth.. and with William Pitt.., presented at court by the marquis of Rockingham and the duke of York... 
  22. ^ Carey, Brycchan (March 2003). "The extraordinary Negro: Ignatius Sancho, Joseph Jekyll, and the Problem of Biography" (PDF) 26 (1). Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies. pp. 1–13. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 
  23. ^ Phillips, Caryl (December 1996). "Director's Forward". Ignatius Sancho: an African Man of Letters. London: National Portrait Gallery. p. 12. 
  24. ^ a b "Ignatius Sancho and Laurence Sterne" (PDF). Norton. 
  25. ^ "Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, The: Amazon.co.uk: Martin Rowson: Books". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 21 October 2012. 
  26. ^ "Tristram Shandy: Gentleman". Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  27. ^ "Tristram Shandy: Gentleman, Tabard Theatre – Review". Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  28. ^ Lewis, C.S., Surprised by Joy, 1955, Chapter VIII.
  29. ^ Donnelly, HS (Fall 2011). "Oh Most Cursed Addition Engine". Onspec Magazine. 23 No 3 (86): 71–84. 

Bibliography

  • Ferriar, John (1798) Illustrations of Sterne
  • Jefferson, D. W. (1951). "Tristram Shandy and the Tradition of Learned Wit". Essays in Criticism 1: 225–48. doi:10.1093/eic/i.3.225. 
  • Petrie, Graham (1970) "A Rhetorical Topic in Tristram Shandy", Modern Language Review, Vol. 65, No. 2, April 1970, pp. 261–66

Further reading

  • Alter, Robert (1968). "Tristram Shandy and the Game of Love". American Scholar 37: 316–323. 
  • Bosch, René (2007), Piet Verhoeff (translator), "Labyrinth of Digressions: Tristram Shandy As Perceived and Influenced by Sterne's Early Imitators", Costerus, new series (Amsterdam: Rodopi) 172, ISBN 90-420-2291-4 
  • Brady, Frank (1970). "Tristram Shandy: Sexuality, Morality, and Sensibility". Eighteenth-Century Studies 4 (1): 41–56. doi:10.2307/2737612. JSTOR 2737612. 
  • Green, Peter (2010). "All Job's Stock of Asses": The Fiction of Laurence Sterne and the Theodicy Debate. Open University (Open Research Online Repository). 
  • Halliday, E. M. (2001). Understanding Thomas Jefferson. New York: Harper Collins Publishers. ISBN 0-06-019793-5. 
  • New, Melvyn (1992). The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, Laurence Sterne. Basingstoke: Macmillan. ISBN 0-395-05145-2.  Collects Brady and Jefferson's essays.
  • Norton, Brian Michael (2006). "The Moral in Phutatorius's Breeches: Tristram Shandy and the Limits of Stoic Ethics". Eighteenth Century Fiction 18 (4): 405–423. doi:10.1353/ecf.2006.0064. ISSN 0840-6286. 
  • Towers, A. R. (1957). "Sterne's Cock and Bull Story". ELH 25 (1): 12–29. JSTOR 2871984. 

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