To Kill a Mockingbird

Why does Atticus Finch risk his reputation, his friendships, and his career to take the Tom Robinson case?

Why does Atticus Finch risk his reputation, his friendships, and his career to take the Tom Robinson case?

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Laundry Is The Only Thing That Should Be Separated By Color In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, racism runs into Maycomb. Atticus Finch, a white man, living a his peaceful life was willing to give up everything he had so that he could fight for a black man. A black man who did not even know and one who was clearly innocent. Maycomb had racism running their way, and it is up to Atticus Finch to stop it. Atticus is well respected by the black community although when he loses the Tom Robinson case. Calpurnia said, "... They 'preciate what you did, Mr. Finch. They--they aren't oversteppin' themselves, are they" (44)? They show their respect for him by standing up for him as he leaves the courtroom. They knew that Atticus truly tried to defend Robinson Robinson even though he lost the case. Throughout the novel, it inferred that Atticus sees everyone as equal, blacks should not be inferior to whites. Atticus is willing to put his son and daughter in harm’s way to save a black man. Atticus Finch stands up for Robinson to prove to the men, women, and children, that the color of one’s skin does not give people the right to treat them any differently. Atticus knew Robinson was innocent when he saw his limp arm. He knew that he was not even capable of doing something like that even if he tried. After all, did not Atticus say, “It is a sin to kill a mockingbird” (119). The quote is explained in the book when Atticus teaches scout that all the mockingbirds do for us is sing their souls out, and it would be a sin to kill an innocent creature. Robinson was innocent just like the mockingbirds and Atticus had to defend him. Robinson being put on trial gives Atticus a chance to show and teach his children about black racism. As Jem matures, he begins to see life with out a big filter on it. He sees prejudice and the impact it males on blacks. Atticus knows that he is going to lose the case, but he still takes on the case because he sees it as his moral obligation. Scout asks Atticus "If you shouldn't be defendin' him, then why are you doin' it?" “For a number of reasons,” said Atticus. “The main one is, if I didn’t I could hold up my head in town… I couldn’t even tell you or Jem not to do something again” (29). Atticus is a man of integrity that is why he feels the need to take on the case. Another reason he agrees with the case is, when he became a lawyer he vowed to defend anyone who needs help being defended. Gandhi once said “we must be the change we wish to see in the world.” The formula to create reform begins with ourselves. Atticus fought for Tom, risked his life for Tom, because he wanted to change the world. He wanted to stop racism.

Atticus is well respected by the black community although when he loses the Tom Robinson case. Calpurnia said, "... They 'preciate what you did, Mr. Finch. They--they aren't oversteppin' themselves, are they" (44)? They show their respect for him by standing up for him as he leaves the courtroom. They knew that Atticus truly tried to defend Robinson Robinson even though he lost the case. Throughout the novel, it inferred that Atticus sees everyone as equal, blacks should not be inferior to whites. Atticus is willing to put his son and daughter in harm’s way to save a black man.

Atticus Finch stands up for Robinson to prove to the men, women, and children, that the color of one’s skin does not give people the right to treat them any differently. Atticus knew Robinson was innocent when he saw his limp arm. He knew that he was not even capable of doing something like that even if he tried. After all, did not Atticus say, “It is a sin to kill a mockingbird” (119). The quote is explained in the book when Atticus teaches scout that all the mockingbirds do for us is sing their souls out, and it would be a sin to kill an innocent creature. Robinson was innocent just like the mockingbirds and Atticus had to defend him.

Robinson being put on trial gives Atticus a chance to show and teach his children about black racism. As Jem matures, he begins to see life with out a big filter on it. He sees prejudice and the impact it males on blacks. Atticus knows that he is going to lose the case, but he still takes on the case because he sees it as his moral obligation. Scout asks Atticus "If you shouldn't be defendin' him, then why are you doin' it?" “For a number of reasons,” said Atticus. “The main one is, if I didn’t I could hold up my head in town… I couldn’t even tell you or Jem not to do something again” (29). Atticus is a man of integrity that is why he feels the need to take on the case. Another reason he agrees with the case is, when he became a lawyer he vowed to defend anyone who needs help being defended.