To Kill a Mockingbird

How does Aunt Alexandra's presence alter the atmosphere of the Finch household?

When she moves in to provide Scout with "feminine influence"; you can also just mention the original atmosphere, that's fine too.

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Aunt Alexandra's views typify the general consensus of traditional assumptions held by the Maycomb community. She introduces the idea of "Fine Folks" to Scout, who will be forever perplexed about what criteria are used to determine whether or not a family fits this category. Her rigid and narrow views of gender and ethnic roles provide much conflict for Scout. Aunt Alexandra tries to pressure Atticus into telling the children why they should behave and "live up to your name." Atticus makes an attempt, but when Scout begins to get upset with this strange side of her father she has never seen before, he returns to his original principles and finds himself incapable of passing on what Aunt Alexandra deems important. Scout is relieved when her father returns to the same old Atticus, and says she knew what he was trying to do, but that "it takes a woman to do that kind of work."