The Old Man and the Sea

what does the old man think of the porpoises and flying fish and the pair of marlin he had hooked before

page 28-62

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As the sun goes down, the marlin Santiago has hooked pulls the bost further and further away until he loses sight of land altogether. The result is a curious stalemate. As Santiago says, "I can do nothing with him and he can do nothing with me....Not as long as he keeps this up" (47). He wishes for the boy again and muses that "no one should be alone in their old age....But it is unavoidable" (48). As if in response to this expression of loneliness, two porpoises come to the surface. Seeing the frolicking couple, Santiago remarks, "They are good....They play and make jokes and love one another. They are our brothers like the flying fish" (48). Santiago then remembers a female marlin he and Manolin caught. The male marlin had stayed beside the boat in despair, leaping in the air to see his mate in the boat before he disappeared into the deep ocean. It was the saddest thing Santiago had ever seen.

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http://www.gradesaver.com/the-old-man-and-the-sea/study-guide/summary-pages-38-54