The House of Bernarda Alba


Film adaptations include:

  • La casa de Bernarda Alba (1987)[4] and its
  • English made-for-TV movie The House of Bernarda Alba (1991)
  • 1991 Indian film directed by Govind Nihlani, Rukmavati ki Haveli.[5]

In 1967, choreographer Eleo Pomare adapted the play into his ballet, Las Desenamoradas,[6] featuring music by John Coltrane.

In 2006, the play was adapted into musical form by Michael John LaChiusa. Under the title Bernarda Alba, it opened at Lincoln Center's Mitzi Newhouse Theater on March 6, 2006, starring Phylicia Rashad in the title role, with a cast that also included Daphne Rubin-Vega.[7]

In 2012, Emily Mann adapted Federico García Lorca's original, shifting the location from 1930s Andalusia, Spain, to contemporary Iran. This shift allows a modern audience to realize and sympathize with oppression that is prevalent in the Middle East. It permits the audience to focus on the emotional poignancy of the script and leaves them to ponder about the political background. Her adaptation opened at the Almeida Theatre under the director Bijan Sheibani, starring Shohreh Aghdashloo as the title character and Hara Yannas as Adela.[8]

Steven Dykes wrote a production named 'Homestead' for the American Theatre Arts (ATA) students in 2004 which was revived in 2013 (The Barn Theatre). The original production went onto perform at The Courtyard in Covent Garden, with members of an ATA graduate company Shady Dolls.

In August 2012, Hyderabad, India based theatre group Sutradhar staged Birjees Qadar Ka Kunba, an Urdu/Hindustani adaptation of The House of Bernard Alba.[9] Directed by Vinay Varma and scripted by Dr. Raghuvir Sahay, the play adapted Lorca's original to a more Indian matriarch family setup. The play boasted of a cast of more than 10 women actors with Vaishali Bisht as Birjees Qadar (Bernard Alba) and Deepti Girotra as Hasan baandi (La Poncia).[10]

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