The Great Gatsby

References

  1. ^ Karolides, Nicholas J.; Bald, Margaret; Sova, Dawn B. (2011). 120 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature (Second ed.). Checkmark Books. p. 499. ISBN 978-0-8160-8232-2. Rather than a celebration of such decadence, the novel functions as a cautionary tale in which an unhappy fate is inevitable for the poor and striving individual, and the rich are allowed to continue without penalty their careless treatment of others' lives. 
  2. ^ Hoover, Bob (10 May 2013). "'The Great Gatsby' still challenges myth of American Dream". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 10 May 2013. 
  3. ^ "Something Extraordinary". Letters of Note. Images by Gareth M. lettersofnote.com. 25 March 2013. Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "100 Best Novels". Modern Library. Retrieved 14 May 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d Bruccoli 2000, pp. 53–54
  6. ^ Gross, Dalton (1998). Understanding the Great Gatsby: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 167. 
  7. ^ Kellogg, Carolyn. "Last gasp of the Gatsby house". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c SparkNotes Editors. "The Great Gatsby: Context". SparkNotes. Retrieved 2013-11-25. 
  9. ^ Powers, Thomas date=July 4, 2013. "The Road to West Egg". London Review of Books 13. pp. 9–11. 
  10. ^ Sarah Churchwell (June 17, 2014). "Murder, Mayhem, and the Invention of The Great Gatsby". The Leonard Lopate Show
  11. ^ a b David Holowka (December 17, 2009). "The Iron Triangle, part 1 / Wilson's Garage". ArchiTakes. 
  12. ^ McCullen, Bonnie Shannon (2007). "This Tremendous Detail: The Oxford Stone in the House of Gatsby". In Assadi, Jamal; Freedman, William. A Distant Drummer: Foreign Perspectives on F. Scott Fitzgerald. New York: Peter Lang. ISBN 978-0820488516. 
  13. ^ Conor, Liz (22 June 2004). The Spectacular Modern Woman: Feminine Visibility in the 1920s. Indiana University Press. p. 301. ISBN 978-0-253-21670-0. 
  14. ^ a b Bruccoli 2000, pp. 9–11
  15. ^ Fitzgerald, F. Scott (1991). Bruccoli, Matthew J., ed. The Great Gatsby. The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press. p. 184. ISBN 9780521402309. This name combines two automobile makes: the sporty Jordan and the conservative Baker electric. 
  16. ^ Fitzgerald, F. Scott (2006). Bloom, Harold, ed. The Great Gatsby. New York: Chelsea House Publishers. p. 95. ISBN 9781438114545. 
  17. ^ Fitzgerald, F. Scott (1997). Tredell, Nicolas, ed. F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby. Columbia Critical Guides. New York: Columbia University Press. p. 184. ISBN 9780231115353. ISSN 1559-3002. 
  18. ^ F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby. Cambridge University Press. 1991. p. liv. 
  19. ^ F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby. Cambridge University Press. 1991. p. 148. 
  20. ^ Bruccoli 2000, p. 29
  21. ^ Mizener, Arthur (24 April 1960). "Gatsby, 35 Years Later". The New York Times. Retrieved 29 July 2013. He had begun to plan the novel in June, 1923, saying to Maxwell Perkins, 'I want to write something new — something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned.' But that summer and fall was devoted to the production of his play, 'The Vegetable.' 
  22. ^ Curnutt, Kirk (2004). A Historical Guide to F. Scott Fitzgerald. Oxford University Press. p. 58. ISBN 0195153030. Retrieved 11 October 2013. The failure of The Vegetable in the fall of 1923 caused Fitzgerald, who was by then in considerable debt, to shut himself in a stuffy room over a garage in Great Neck, New York, and write himself out of the red by turning out ten short stories for the magazine market. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Mizener, Arthur (24 April 1960). "Gatsby, 35 Years Later". The New York Times. Retrieved 12 May 2013. 
  24. ^ Fitzgerald, F. Scott (1963). Turnbull, Andrew, ed. The Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Charles Scribner's Sons. p. 189. 3. 'Winter Dreams' (a sort of first draft of the Gatsby idea from Metropolitan 1923) 
  25. ^ Murphy, Mary Jo (30 September 2010). "Eyeing the Unreal Estate of Gatsby Esq.". The New York Times
  26. ^ Bruccoli 2000, pp. 38–39
  27. ^ Bruccoli 2000, p. 45
  28. ^ Randall, Mónica (2003). The Mansions of Long Island's Gold Coast. Rizzoli. pp. 275–277. ISBN 978-0-8478-2649-0. 
  29. ^ West, James L. W., III (2000). Trimalchio: An Early Version of The Great Gatsby. The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Cover Design by Dennis M. Arnold. Cambridge University Press. p. xi. ISBN 0-521-89047-0. Retrieved 27 July 2013. He produces 18,000 words; most of this material is later discarded, but he salvages the short story "Absolution," published in June 1924. 
  30. ^ Haglund, David (7 May 2013). "The Forgotten Childhood of Jay Gatsby". Slate
  31. ^ Eble, Kenneth (Winter 1974). "The Great Gatsby". College Literature 1 (1): 37. ISSN 0093-3139. Retrieved 24 May 2013. consciously artistic achievement 
  32. ^ Flanagan, Thomas (21 December 2000). "Fitzgerald's 'Radiant World'". The New York Review of Books. Retrieved 24 May 2013. He may have been remembering Fitzgerald's words in that April letter: So in my new novel I'm thrown directly on purely creative work—not trashy imaginings as in my stories but the sustained imagination of a sincere yet radiant world. 
  33. ^ Leader, Zachary (21 September 2000). "Daisy packs her bags". London Review of Books 22 (18): 13–15. ISSN 0260-9592. Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  34. ^ Tate, Mary Jo (2007). Critical Companion to F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work. Infobase Publishing. p. 326. ISBN 9781438108452. They lived in ROME from October 1924 to February 1925... 
  35. ^ Perkins, Maxwell Evarts (2004). Bruccoli, Matthew Joseph; Baughman, Judith S., eds. The Sons of Maxwell Perkins: Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, and Their Editor. Univ. of South Carolina Press. pp. 27–30. ISBN 9781570035487. 
  36. ^ Bruccoli 2000, pp. 54–56
  37. ^ Fitzerald, F. Scott. "F. Scott Fitzgerald's ledger". Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. University of South Carolina. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  38. ^ Zuckerman, Esther. "The Finances of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Handwritten by Fitzgerald". The Atlantic Wire. The Atlantic Media Company. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  39. ^ a b c d Scribner, Charles, III (Winter 1992). "Celestial Eyes: From Metamorphosis to Masterpiece" (PDF). Princeton University Library Chronicle 53 (2): 140–155. Retrieved 27 July 2013.  (originally published as a brochure on 24 October 1991 to celebrate the Cambridge Edition of The Great Gatsby)
  40. ^ Scribner, Charles, III (Winter 1992). "Celestial Eyes: From Metamorphosis to Masterpiece" (PDF). Princeton University Library Chronicle 53 (2): 140–155. Retrieved 27 July 2013. We are left then with the enticing possibility that Fitzgerald's arresting image was originally prompted by Cugat's fantastic apparitions over the valley of ashes; in other words, that the author derived his inventive metamorphosis from a recurrent theme of Cugat's trial jackets, one which the artist himself was to reinterpret and transform through subsequent drafts.  (originally published as a brochure on 24 October 1991 to celebrate the Cambridge Edition of The Great Gatsby)
  41. ^ Hemingway, Ernest (1964). A Moveable Feast. New York: Scribner. p. 176. ISBN 978-0-684-82499-4. 
  42. ^ a b c d e Anderson, Kurt (25 November 2010). "American Icons: The Great Gatsby". Studio 360. 14:26. Retrieved 22 May 2013. [Donald Skemer (introduced 12:59) speaking] He went through many many titles, uh, including Under the Red, White, and Blue and Trimalchio and Gold-hatted Gatsby ... [James West (introduced at 12:11) speaking] The High Bouncing Lover. And, uh, he in the end didn't think that The Great Gatsby was a very good title, was dissatisfied with it. 
  43. ^ "The girl at the Grand Palais". The Economist. 22 December 2012. Retrieved 27 March 2013. 
  44. ^ a b c d Vanderbilt, Arthur T. (1999). The Making of a Bestseller: From Author to Reader. McFarland. p. 96. ISBN 0786406631. A week later, in his next letter, he was floundering: 'I have not decided to stick to the title I put on the book, Trimalchio in West Egg. The only other titles that seem to fit it are Trimalchio and On the Road to West Egg. I had two others, Gold-hatted Gatsby and The High-bouncing Lover, but they seemed too slight.' 
  45. ^ F. Scott Fitzgerald, Chapter 7 opening sentence, The Great Gatsby
  46. ^ Tanner's introduction to the Penguin edition (2000), p. vii–viii.
  47. ^ Hill, W. Speed; Burns, Edward M.; Shillingsburg, Peter L. (2002). Text: An Interdisciplinary Annual of Textual Studies 14. University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0472112724. ..., because in early November he wrote Perkins that "I have now decided to stick to the title I put on the book. Trimalchio in West Egg. 
  48. ^ Fitzgerald, Francis Scott; Perkins, Maxwell (1971). Kuehl, John; Bryer, Jackson R., eds. Dear Scott/Dear Max: the Fitzgerald-Perkins correspondence. Macmillan Publishing Company. p. 87. When Ring Lardner came in the other day I told him about your novel and he instantly balked at the title. 'No one could pronounce it,' he said; so probably your change is wise on other than typographical counts. 
  49. ^ Bruccoli 2002, pp. 206–07
  50. ^ Tate, Mary Jo (2007). Critical Companion to F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work. Infobase Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 9781438108452. He settled on The Great Gatsby in December 1924, but in January and March 1925 he continued to express his concern to Perkins about the title, cabling from CAPRI on March 19: 'CRAZY ABOUT TITLE UNDER THE RED WHITE AND BLUE STOP WHART [sic] WOULD DELAY BE' 
  51. ^ Lipton, Gabrielle. "Where Is Jay Gatsby's Mansion?". slate.com. The Slate Group, a Division of the Washington Post Company. Retrieved 6 May 2013. However, nearing the time of publication, Fitzgerald, who despised the title The Great Gatsby and toiled for months to think of something else, wrote to Perkins that he had finally found one: Under the Red, White, and Blue. Unfortunately, it was too late to change. 
  52. ^ Churchwell, Sarah (3 May 2013). "What makes The Great Gatsby great?". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 October 2013. At the last minute, he had asked his editor if they could change the new novel's title to Under the Red, White and Blue, but it was too late. 
  53. ^ Lazo, Caroline Evensen (2003). F. Scott Fitzgerald: Voice of the Jazz Age. Twenty-First Century Books. p. 75. ISBN 0822500744. When the book was published on April 10, 1924, the critics raved. 
  54. ^ Bruccoli 2002, pp. 215–17
  55. ^ West, James L. W., III (2000). Trimalchio: An Early Version of The Great Gatsby. The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Cover Design by Dennis M. Arnold. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-89047-0. Retrieved 27 July 2013. 
  56. ^ West, James L. W., III (10 April 2013). "What Baz Luhrmann Asked Me About The Great Gatsby". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 27 July 2013. Luhrmann was also interested in Trimalchio, the early version of The Great Gatsby that I published in 2000 as a volume in the Cambridge Edition. 
  57. ^ Alter, Alexandra (19 April 2013). "A Darker, More Ruthless Gatsby". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 3 July 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2013. Gatsby comes across as more confident and aggressive in 'Trimalchio' during a confrontation with romantic rival Tom Buchanan at the Plaza Hotel, challenging Tom's assertion that Gatsby and Daisy's affair is 'a harmless little flirtation.' 
  58. ^ Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.
  59. ^ Churchwell, Sarah (3 May 2013). "What makes The Great Gatsby great?". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 October 2013. 
  60. ^ a b Symkus, Ed (4 May 2013). "'Gatsby': What's so great?". Boston Globe. Retrieved 5 May 2013. 
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  81. ^ Cole, John Y., ed. (1984). Books in Action: the Armed Services Editions. Washington: Library of Congress. p. 28. ISBN 0844404667. Retrieved 22 May 2013. One hundred fifty-five thousand ASE copies of The Great Gatsby were distributed-as against the twenty-five thousand copies of the novel printed by Scribners between 1925 and 1942. 
  82. ^ Beckwith, Ryan Teague (12 May 2013). "A novel fact: Wartime - and the U.S. military - boosted sales of 'The Great Gatsby' from good to 'Great'". The Denver Post. Retrieved 22 May 2013. 
  83. ^ Verghis, Sharon (4 May 2013). "Careless people of F Scott Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby have a modern equivalent". The Australian. Retrieved 5 May 2013. 
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  87. ^ "The Washington Ballet: The Great Gatsby". Kennedy Center. Retrieved 2014-04-01. 
  88. ^ Aguirre, Abby (2011-11-04). "Gatsby En Pointe". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-04-01. 
  89. ^ Norman, Neil (2013-05-17). "Dance Review: The Great Gatsby". The Sunday Express. Retrieved 2014-09-19. 
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Bibliography

  • Batchelor, Bob (2013). Gatsby: The Cultural History of the Great American Novel. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. ISBN 978-0810891951. Retrieved 15 July 2014. 
  • Bruccoli, Matthew Joseph, ed. (2000). F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: A Literary Reference. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers. ISBN 0-7867-0996-0. 
  • Bruccoli, Matthew Joseph (2002). Some Sort of Epic Grandeur: The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald (2nd rev. ed.). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. ISBN 1-57003-455-9. Retrieved 25 February 2013. 
  • Mizener, Arthur (1951). "The Far Side of Paradise: A Biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald". Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 
  • Drudzina, Douglas (2006). Teaching F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby from Multiple Critical Pers

pectives. Prestwick House, Inc. ISBN 978-1-58049-174-7. 


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