The Great Gatsby

Nick catalogs the names of the party guests from the summer of 1922. Provide five examples of bad judgments or immorality from these people.

Also, what point is Fitzgerald trying to make by showing this unsavory side of wealth?

In Chapter 4 of The Great Gatsby

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Fitzgerald is pointing out the fact that money doesn't breed class. In fact, it seems that the more money one had, the more likely they are to believe themselves above the law.

Clarence Endive was from East Egg, as I remember. He came only once, in white knickerbockers, and had a fight with a bum named Etty in the garden.

Snell was there three days before he went to the penitentiary, so drunk out on the gravel drive that Mrs. Ulysses Swett’s automobile ran over his right hand.

Ferret and the De Jongs and Ernest Lilly — they came to gamble, and when Ferret wandered into the garden it meant he was cleaned out and Associated Traction would have to fluctuate profitably next day.

A man named Klipspringer was there so often and so long that he became known as “the boarder.”— I doubt if he had any other home.

Also from New York were the Chromes and the Backhyssons and the Dennickers and Russel Betty and the Corrigans and the Kellehers and the Dewars and the Scullys and S. W. Belcher and the Smirkes and the young Quinns, divorced now, and Henry L. Palmetto, who killed himself by jumping in front of a subway train in Times Square.


The Great Gatsby