The Federalist Papers

Notes

  1. ^ a b Jackson, Kenneth T. The Encyclopedia of New York City: The New York Historical Society; Yale University Press; 1995. p. 194.
  2. ^ The Federalist Papers. Toronto: Bantam Books. 1982. 
  3. ^ Wills, x.
  4. ^ Richard B. Morris, The Forging of the Union: 1781-1789 (1987) p. 309
  5. ^ Furtwangler, 48-49.
  6. ^ Gunn, Giles B. (1994). Early American Writing. Penguin Classics. p. 540. ISBN 0-14-039087-1. 
  7. ^ Furtwangler, 51-56.
  8. ^ a b Furtwangler, 51.
  9. ^ Lance Banning, "James Madison: Federalist," note 1, [1].
  10. ^ See, e.g. Ralph Ketcham, James Madison. New York: Macmillan, 1971; reprint ed., Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998. See also Irving N. Brant, James Madison: Father of the Constitution, 1787–1800. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1950.
  11. ^ Wills, xii.
  12. ^ Furtwangler, 20.
  13. ^ The Federalist timeline at www.sparknotes.com.
  14. ^ Adair, 40-41.
  15. ^ Adair, 44-46.
  16. ^ Henry Cabot Lodge, ed. (1902). The Federalist, a Commentary on the Constitution of the United States. Putnam. pp. xxxviii–xliii. Retrieved February 16, 2009. 
  17. ^ Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison (Jacob E. Cooke, ed., The Federalist (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1961 and later reprintings). ISBN 978-0-8195-6077-3.
  18. ^ Adair, 46-48.
  19. ^ Adair, 48.
  20. ^ Jeff Collins, David Kaufer, Pantelis Vlachos, Brian Butler and Suguru Ishizaki, "Detecting Collaborations in Text: Comparing the Authors' Rhetorical Language Choices in the Federalist Papers" Computers and the Humanities 38 no. 1 (Feb. 2004).
  21. ^ Mosteller and Wallace.
  22. ^ Fung, Glenn, The disputed federalist papers: SVM feature selection via concave minimization, New York City, ACM Press, 2003. (9 pg pdf file)
  23. ^ Furtwangler, 21.
  24. ^ Furtwangler, 22.
  25. ^ Coenen, Dan. "Fifteen Curious Facts about The Federalist Papers". Media Commons. Retrieved December 5, 2012. 
  26. ^ Furtwangler, 23.
  27. ^ This scheme of division is adapted from Charles K. Kesler's introduction to The Federalist Papers (New York: Signet Classic, 1999) pp. 15-17. A similar division is indicated by Furtwangler, 57-58.
  28. ^ Wills, 274.
  29. ^ Jeffrey Tulis (1987). The Rhetorical Presidency. Princeton University Press. p. 30. ISBN 0-691-02295-X. 
  30. ^ Harvey Flaumenhaft, “Hamilton's Administrative Republic and the American Presidency,” in The Presidency in the Constitutional Order, ed. Joseph M. Bessette and Jeffrey Tulis (Baton Rouge and London: Louisiana State University Press, 1981), 65-114.
  31. ^ Lupu, Ira C.; "The Most-Cited Federalist Papers". Constitutional Commentary (1998) pp 403+; using Supreme Court citations, the five most cited were Federalist No. 42 (Madison) (33 decisions), Federalist No. 78 (Hamilton) (30 decisions), Federalist No. 81 (Hamilton) (27 decisions), Federalist No. 51 (Madison) (26 decisions), Federalist No. 32 (Hamilton) (25 decisions).
  32. ^ See, among others, a very early exploration of the judicial use of The Federalist in Charles W. Pierson, "The Federalist in the Supreme Court", The Yale Law Journal, Vol. 33, No. 7. (May 1924), pp. 728-735.
  33. ^ Chernow, Ron. "Alexander Hamilton". Penguin Books, 2004. (p. 260)
  34. ^ Arthur, John (1995). Words That Bind: Judicial Review and the Grounds of Modern Constitutional Theory. Westview Press. p. 41. ISBN 0-8133-2349-5. 
  35. ^ Madison to Thomas Ritchie, September 15, 1821. Quoted in Furtwangler, 36.
  36. ^ Max Farrand, ed. (1911). The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787. Yale University Press. 
  37. ^ a b c Nos. 18, 19, 20 are frequently indicated as being jointly written by Hamilton and Madison. However, Adair concurs with previous historians that these are Madison's writing alone: "Madison had certainly written all of the essays himself, including in revised form only a small amount of pertinent information submitted by Hamilton from his rather sketchy research on the same subject." Adair, 63.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l One of twelve "disputed papers" to which both Madison and Hamilton laid claim. Modern scholarly consensus leans towards Madison as the author of all twelve, and he is so credited in this table. See Federalist Papers: Disputed essays. See Adair, 93: "The disputed numbers of The Federalist claimed by both Hamilton and Madison are Numbers 49 through 58 and Numbers 62 and 63.

This content is from Wikipedia. GradeSaver is providing this content as a courtesy until we can offer a professionally written study guide by one of our staff editors. We do not consider this content professional or citable. Please use your discretion when relying on it.