The Canterbury Tales

Notes

  1. ^ Carlson, David. "The Chronology of Lydgate's Chaucer References". The Chaucer Review, Vol. 38, No. 3 (2004), pp. 246–254. Accessed 6 January 2014.
  2. ^ The name "Tales of Caunterbury" appears within the surviving texts of Chaucer's work. Its modern name first appeared as Canterbury talys in John Lydgate's 1421-2 prologue to the Siege of Thebes.[1]
  3. ^ a b Pearsall, 8.
  4. ^ Cooper, 6—7
  5. ^ Pearsall, 10, 17.
  6. ^ Cooper, 8.
  7. ^ Linne R. Mooney (2006), "Chaucer's Scribe," Speculum, 81 : 97–138.
  8. ^ a b c Cooper, 7
  9. ^ Pearsall, 14–15.
  10. ^ Text from The Riverside Chaucer, ed. by Larry D. Benson, 3rd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987), p. 153.
  11. ^ Based on the information in Norman Davies, "Language and Versification", in The Riverside Chaucer, ed. by Larry D. Benson, 3rd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987), pp. xxv–xli.
  12. ^ Linne R. Mooney, "Chaucer’s Scribe", Speculum, 81 (2006), 97–138.
  13. ^ e.g. Ian Robinson, Chaucer's Prosody: A Study of the Middle English Verse Tradition (London: Cambridge University Press, 1971).
  14. ^ Seminal studies included M. L. Samuels, "Chaucerian Final '-e'", Notes and Queries, 19 (1972), 445–48, and D. Burnley, "Inflection in Chaucer's Adjectives", Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, 83 (1982), 169–77.
  15. ^ Cooper, p. 10.
  16. ^ Bloom, Harold (11 November 2009). "Road Trip". New York Times. Retrieved 9 September 2013. 
  17. ^ Cooper, pp. 10–11.
  18. ^ Cooper, pp. 12–16.
  19. ^ Brewer, p. 227. Although Chaucer undoubtedly studied the works of these celebrated writers, and particularly of Dante before this fortunate interview; yet it seems likely, that these excursions gave him a new relish for their compositions, and enlarged his knowledge of the Italian fables.
  20. ^ Brewer, p. 277. ...where he became thoroughly inbued with the spirit and excellence of the great Italian poets and prose-writers: Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio; and is said to have had a personal contact interview with one of these, Petrarch.
  21. ^ Hendrickson , pp. 183–192. Professor G. L. Hendrickson of the University of Chicago gives a detailed analysis as to Chaucer coming in contact with Petrarch.
  22. ^ Rearden, p. 458. There can be no moral doubt but that Chaucer knew Petrarch personally. They were both in France many times, where they might have met. They were both courtiers. They both had an enthusiasm for scholarship. Whether they met then, or whether Chaucer, when on his visit to Genoa, specially visited the Italian, it does not appear. ...but the only reason that such a visit could not have occurred lies in the fact that Petrarch himself does not record it. Still, on the other hand, would he have mentioned the visit of a man who was the servant of a barbarous monarch, and whose only claim to notice, literary-wise, was his cultivation of an unknown and uncouth dialect that was half bastard French?
  23. ^ Skeat (1874), p. xxx. And we know that Petrarch, on his own shewing, was so pleased with the story of Griselda that he learnt it by heart as well as he could, for the express purpose of repeating it to friends, before the idea of turning it into Latin occurred to him. Whence we may conclude that Chaucer and Petrarch met at Padua early in 1373; that Petrarch told Chaucer the story by word of mouth, either in Italian or French; and that Chaucer shortly after obtained a copy of Petrarch's Latin version, which he kept constantly before him whilst making his own translation.
  24. ^ "Sources and Analogues of the Canterbury Tales", 2002, p. 22.
  25. ^ Cooper, 8–9.
  26. ^ Cooper, 17–18.
  27. ^ Cooper, 18.
  28. ^ Cooper, 22–24.
  29. ^ Cooper, 24–25.
  30. ^ Cooper, 25–26.
  31. ^ Cooper, 5–6.
  32. ^ Donald R. Howard, Chaucer and the Medieval World (London, 1987), pp. 410-417.
  33. ^ Bisson, pp. 49–51, 56–62.
  34. ^ Bisson, pp. 50.
  35. ^ Bisson, pp. 61–64.
  36. ^ Bisson, pp. 66–67.
  37. ^ Bisson, pp. 67–68.
  38. ^ Bisson, pp. 73–75, 81.
  39. ^ Bisson, pp. 91–95.
  40. ^ Rubin, 106–107.
  41. ^ "The Prioress's Tale", by Prof. Jane Zatta.
  42. ^ Bisson, pp. 99–102.
  43. ^ Bisson, pp. 110–113.
  44. ^ Bisson, pp. 117–119.
  45. ^ Bisson, pp. 123–131.
  46. ^ Bisson, pp. 132–134.
  47. ^ Bisson, pp. 139–142.
  48. ^ Bisson, pp. 138.
  49. ^ Bisson, pp. 141–142.
  50. ^ Bisson, pp. 143.
  51. ^ a b Cooper, 19
  52. ^ Cooper, 21.
  53. ^ Pearsall, 294-5.
  54. ^ Pearsall, 295-97.
  55. ^ Pearsall, 298–302.
  56. ^ Trigg, Stephanie, Congenial Souls: Reading Chaucer from Medieval to Postmodern, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002, p. 86. ISBN 0-8166-3823-3.
  57. ^ Trigg, pp. 86–88, 97.
  58. ^ Trigg, pp. 88–97.
  59. ^ Brewer, Charlotte, Editing Piers Plowman: The Evolution of the Text, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996, pp. 8–9. ISBN 0-521-34250-3.
  60. ^ Ohlgren, Thomas, Medieval Outlaws, Parlor Press, 2005, pp. 264–265. ISBN 1-932559-62-0.
  61. ^ Ellis, Steve, Chaucer at Large, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2000, pp. 64–65. ISBN 0-8166-3376-2.
  62. ^ Pencak, William, The Films of Derek Jarman, Jefferson: McFarland & Co, 2002, pp. 178–9. ISBN 0-7864-1430-8.
  63. ^ Bignell, Jonathan, Postmodern Media Culture, Aakar Books, 2007. ISBN 81-89833-16-2 pp. 93–94.
  64. ^ Rosenbaum, Jonathan et al, The Medieval Hero on Screen, Jefferson: McFarland, 2004, pp. 202–203. ISBN 0-7864-1926-1.
  65. ^ "BBC – Drama – Canterbury Tales". BBC Drama article about the series. Retrieved 6 May 2007. 
  66. ^ "On These Walls: Inscriptions and Quotations in the Buildings of the Library of Congress". Retrieved 31 December 2012. 

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