The Canterbury Tales

Where does the "Wife of Bath" fit in?

"fit into the mold" - how do they fit in with the group

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For a detailed look at each of these characters, simply follow the link provided below to access Gradesaver's summary of the prologue. In this summary, you will find the order (from highest to lowest) or status of each of the pilgrims. I assume that this is what your question refers to as far as "fitting in." Chaucer's pilgrims represent the different rungs of English society. The summary will supply you with this information in order of importance. 

The Wife of Bath was 'somdel deef' (a little deaf, as her tale will later expand upon) and that was a shame. The Wife of Bath is so adept at making cloth that she surpasses even the cloth-making capitals of Chaucer's world, Ypres and Ghent, and she wears coverchiefs (linen coverings for the head) which must (the narrator assumes) have 'weyeden ten pound'. She had had five husbands through the church door, and had been at Jerusalem, Rome and Boulogne on pilgrimage. She is also described as 'Gat-tothed' (traditionally denoting lasciviousness), and as keeping good company, she knows all the answers about love: 'for she koude of that art the olde daunce' (she knew the whole dance as far as love is concerned!).