The Antichrist

References and footnotes

  1. ^ Nietzsche Chronicle: 1889 (English)
  2. ^ The English word "Christian" is called a weak noun in German and, in the singular nominative case, it is translated as "der Christ". "... in German Der Antichrist can mean either The Anti–Christ or The Anti–Christian", ( Nietzsche, Friedrich, The Anti–Christ, Introduction by Michael Tanner, Translated by R.J. Hollingdale, Penguin Books, 1990, ISBN 0-14-044514-5)
  3. ^ a b The Antichrist, Foreword.
  4. ^ "...Such men alone are my readers, my right readers, my predestined readers: what matter the rest? The rest—that is merely mankind. One must be above mankind in strength, in loftiness of soul—in contempt.", The Antichrist, Preface
  5. ^ The Antichrist, § 1
  6. ^ Schopenhauer, The World as Will and Representation, Vol. I, § 48
  7. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 2
  8. ^ "It is this Compassion alone which is the real basis of all voluntary justice and all genuine loving–kindness. Only insofar as an action springs therefrom, has it moral value; and all conduct that proceeds from any other motive whatever has none." Arthur Schopenhauer, The Basis of Morality, Part III, Chapter V.
  9. ^ The Antichrist, § 3, 4, 5
  10. ^ Nietzsche's opinion of Pascal is again the opposite of Schopenhauer's. In Volume I of his main work, § 66, Schopenhauer considered Pascal's asceticism and quietism as examples of justice and goodness. With regard to original sin, Schopenhauer wrote: "The doctrine of original sin (affirmation of the will) and of salvation (denial of the will) is really the great truth which constitutes the kernel of Christianity, while the rest is in the main only clothing and covering, or something accessory."(§ 70)
  11. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 6
  12. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 7
  13. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 8
  14. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 9
  15. ^ The Antichrist, § 10
  16. ^ The Antichrist, § 11
  17. ^ The Antichrist, § 12
  18. ^ The Antichrist., § 13
  19. ^ The Antichrist., § 14
  20. ^ The Antichrist, § 15
  21. ^ The Antichrist, § 16
  22. ^ The Antichrist, § 17
  23. ^ a b c d The Antichrist, § 18
  24. ^ Schopenhauer, The World as Will and Representation, Vol. I, § 71
  25. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 19
  26. ^ The Antichrist, § 20
  27. ^ The Antichrist, § 21
  28. ^ The Antichrist, § 22
  29. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 23
  30. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 24
  31. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 27
  32. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 25
  33. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 26
  34. ^ The Portable Nietzsche, note, p. 601
  35. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 29
  36. ^ The Antichrist, § 30
  37. ^ The Antichrist, § 31
  38. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 32
  39. ^ a b c d The Antichrist, § 33
  40. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 34
  41. ^ The Antichrist, § 35
  42. ^ The Antichrist, § 36
  43. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 37
  44. ^ The Antichrist, § 38
  45. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 39
  46. ^ The Antichrist, § 40
  47. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 41
  48. ^ The Antichrist, § 42
  49. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 43
  50. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 44
  51. ^ The Antichrist, § 46
  52. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 47
  53. ^ The Antichrist, § 48
  54. ^ The Antichrist, § 49
  55. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 50
  56. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 51
  57. ^ The Antichrist, § 52
  58. ^ The Antichrist, § 53
  59. ^ Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Part II, "Of the Priests"
  60. ^ The Antichrist, § 54
  61. ^ The Antichrist, § 55
  62. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 56
  63. ^ The Antichrist, § 57
  64. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 58
  65. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 59
  66. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 60
  67. ^ a b The Antichrist, § 61
  68. ^ a b c The Antichrist, § 62
  69. ^ a b Kaufmann, Walter. Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist. Fourth Edition. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1974.) Pg. 7. "...in 1888, Nietzsche had abandoned the entire project of The Will to Power. Some previous drafts had called for the subtitle, "Attempt at a Revaluation of All Values"; and Nietzsche, who now proposed to write a different magnum opus, decided on the title Revaluation of All Values—and actually finished the first quarter: the Antichrist [...] Moreover, the Antichrist, however provocative, represents a more single-minded and sustained inquiry than any of Nietzsche's other books and thus suggests that the major work of which it constitutes Part I was not meant to consist of that maze of incoherent, if extremely interesting, observations which have since been represented as his crowning achievement [i.e., The Will to Power.]"
  70. ^ Arthur Danto, Nietzsche as Philosopher, Chapter 6, § 5
  71. ^ Cf. Nietzsche, The Antichrist.
    • § 29 "True life, eternal life is found — it is not promised, it is here, it is within you ... ."
    • § 29 "'The kingdom of God is within you ' ..." This is a reference to Luke 17:21.
    • § 34 "The 'kingdom of Heaven' is a condition of the heart ... ."
    • § 34 "The 'kingdom of God' is not something one waits for; it has no yesterday or tomorrow, it does not come 'in a thousand years' — it is an experience within a heart... ."
    • § 35 "His words to the thief on the cross contain the whole Evangel. 'That was verily a divine man, a child of God' — says the thief. 'If thou feelest this' — answers the redeemer — ' thou art in Paradise ... .' "
  72. ^ Quoted from the English translation of The Antichrist as shown at The Nietzsche Channel website: "Nietzsche refers to the conversion of one of the two thieves crucified with Jesus, which is only reported in the tale of suffering by Luke (23: 39-43; compare it with Matthew 27: 44; Mark 15, 31-32). However, the words which Nietzsche puts into the mouth of the thief are those of the captain after Christ's death: compare Luke 23: 47; Matthew. 27: 54; Mark 15: 39. Perhaps the Nietzsche-Archive didn't want to see the 'cohesiveness of the Bible' disputed by Nietzsche, hence the suppression of this part; compare Josef Hofmiller: Nietzsche, 'Süddeutsche Monatshefte' November 1931, p. 94ff."
  73. ^ Microsoft Word - Jesus.doc
  74. ^ In his notebook, Nietzsche wrote: "When even the criminal undergoing a painful death declares: 'the way this Jesus suffers and dies, without rebelling, without enmity, graciously, resignedly, is the only right way,' he has affirmed the gospel: and with that he is in Paradise—" [Will to Power, Edited by Walter Kaufmann, Vintage, 1968, §162]
  75. ^ The Antichrist, "Translator's Note", Penguin Books, 1990. "... omissions from the [1895] text were subsequently published and are restored in Karl Schlechta's edition (Werke in drei Bänden, vol. II, 1955)."

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