The Aeneid

Footnotes

  1. ^ Virgil (2006). The Aeneid. Trans. by Robert Fagles. United States of America: Viking Press. ISBN 978-0-670-03803-9. 
  2. ^ E.G. Knauer, "Vergil's Aeneid and Homer", Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 5 (1964) 61–84. Originating in Servius's observation, tufts.edu
  3. ^ The majority of the Odyssey is devoted to events on Ithaca, not to Odysseus' wanderings, so that the second half of the Odyssey very broadly corresponds to the second half of the Aeneid (the hero fights to establish himself in his new/renewed home). Joseph Farrell has observed, "...let us begin with the traditional view that Virgil's epic divides into 'Odyssean' and 'Iliadic' halves. Merely accepting this idea at face value is to mistake for a destination what Virgil clearly offered as the starting-point of a long and wondrous journey" ("The Virgilian Intertext", Cambridge Companion to Virgil, p. 229).
  4. ^ Glazewski, Johanna (1972). "The Function of Vergil's Funeral Games". The Classical World 66 (2): 85–96. doi:10.2307/4347751. 
  5. ^ Fowler, "Virgil", in Hornblower and Spawnforth (eds), Oxford Classical Dictionary, 3rd edition, 1996, pg.1605-6
  6. ^ Fowler, pg.1603
  7. ^ Sellar, William Young; Glover, Terrot Reaveley (1911). "Virgil". Encyclopædia Britannica 28 (11th ed.). p. 112. Retrieved 7 June 2012. 
  8. ^ Pound and Spann; Confucius to Cummings: An Anthology of Poetry, New Directions, p.34.
  9. ^ See Emily Wilson Passions and a Man, New Republic Online (11 January 2007), which cites Pound's claim that the translation even improved on the Virgil because Douglas had "heard the sea".
  10. ^ "Virgil:Aeneid II". Poetryintranslation.com. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  11. ^ Search of the Latin from perseus.tufts.edu
  12. ^ Hahn, E. Adelaide. "Pietas versus Violentia in the Aeneid." The Classical Weekly, 25.2 (1931): 9–13.
  13. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 2.1043–1047.
  14. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 6.921–923.
  15. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 4.499.
  16. ^ McLeish, Kenneth. "Dido, Aeneas, and the Concept of 'Pietas'." Greece and Rome 19.2 (1972): 127–135.
  17. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 2.874–876.
  18. ^ Coleman, Robert. "The Gods in the Aeneid." Greece and Rome 29.2 (Oct 1982): 143–168; also see Block, E. "The Effects of Divine Manifestation on the Reader's Perspective in Vergil's Aeneid." (Salem, NH) 1984.
  19. ^ Duckworth, George E. "Fate and Free Will in Vergil's "Aeneid"". The Classical Journal 51.8 (1956): 357–364.
  20. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 10.890–966.
  21. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 4.173–177.
  22. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 4.492–499.
  23. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 4.373–375.
  24. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 4.312–315.
  25. ^ Fitzgerald, Robert, translator and postscript. "Virgil's The Aeneid". New York: Vintage Books (1990). 415.
  26. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 1.3–8.
  27. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 6.1203–1210.
  28. ^ Scully, Stephen. "Refining Fire in "Aeneid" 8." Vergilius (1959–) 46 (2000): 93–113.
  29. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 4.469–471.
  30. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 4.864–868.
  31. ^ Fitzgerald, Robert, translator and postscript. "Virgil's The Aeneid". New York: Vintage Books (1990). 407.
  32. ^ Hahn, E. Adelaide. "Pietas versus Violentia in the Aeneid." The Classical Weekly, 25.2 (1931): 9.
  33. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 12.1291–1294.
  34. ^ Pogorselski, Randall J. "The "Reassurance of Fratricide" in The Aeneid." The American Journal of Philology 130.2 (Summer 2009): 261–289.
  35. ^ Fitzgerald, Robert, translator and postscript. "Virgil's The Aeneid". New York: Vintage Books (1990). 412–414.
  36. ^ Grebe, Sabine. "Augustus' Divine Authority and Virgil's Aeneid." Vergilius (1959–) 50 (2004): 35–62.
  37. ^ Scully, Stephen. "Refining Fire in Aeneid 8." Vergilius (1959–) 46 (2000): 91–113.
  38. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 2.1036–1040.
  39. ^ Fitzgerald 1983, 6.1058–1067.
  40. ^ Trans. David West, "The Aeneid" (1991) xxiii.
  41. ^ The anecdote, in which the poet read the passage in Book VI in praise of Octavia's late son Marcellus, and Octavia fainted with grief, was recorded in the late fourth-century vita of Virgil by Aelius Donatus.
  42. ^ Kleinberg, Aviad M. (2008). Flesh Made Word: Saints' Stories and the Western Imagination. Harvard UP. p. 68. ISBN 978-0-674-02647-6. 
  43. ^ Montaner, Carlos Alberto (2003). Twisted Roots: Latin America's Living Past. Algora. p. 118. ISBN 978-0-87586-260-6. 
  44. ^ Horsfall, Nicholas (2000). A Companion to the Study of Virgil. Brill. p. 303. ISBN 978-90-04-11951-2. 
  45. ^ Burman, Thomas E. (2009). Reading the Qur'ān in Latin Christendom, 1140–1560. U of Pennsylvania P. p. 84. ISBN 978-0-8122-2062-9. 
  46. ^ Savage, John J.H. (1932). "The Manuscripts of the Commentary of Servius Danielis on Virgil". Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 43: 77–121. JSTOR 310668. 
  47. ^ Grafton, Anthony; Most, Glenn W.; Settis, Salvatore (2010). The Classical Tradition. Harvard UP. pp. 294–97. ISBN 978-0-674-03572-0. 
  48. ^ Skinner, Marilyn B. (2010). A Companion to Catullus. John Wiley. pp. 448â??49. ISBN 978-1-4443-3925-3. 
  49. ^ "Latin : Virgil; Course Description" (PDF). College Board. 2011. p. 14. Retrieved 30 August 2011. 
  50. ^ McGrath, F. C. (1990). "Brian Friel and the Politics of the Anglo-Irish Language". Colby Quarterly 26 (4): 247. 
  51. ^ Ballad Full Text at the English Broadside Ballad Archive
  52. ^ [1]
  53. ^ "The Aeneid". V.I. Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine. World Digital Library. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  54. ^ "Russian animation in letters and figures | Films | ╚ENEIDA╩". Animator.ru. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 

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