The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Develop an argument that huck is actually an intelligent, ingenious boy. Cute examples from text to support.


Asked by
Last updated by jill d #170087
Answers 1
Add Yours

"Please take it," says I, "and don't ask me nothing—then I won't have to tell no lies." (Chapter 4)

To Jim:

"Well, I did. I said I wouldn't, and I'll stick to it. Honest INJUN, I will. People would call me a low-down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum—but that don't make no difference. I ain't a-going to tell, and I ain't a-going back there, anyways. So, now, le's know all about it." (Chapter 8)

Pap always said it warn't no harm to borrow things if you was meaning to pay them back some time; but the widow said it warn't anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it. Jim said he reckoned the widow was partly right and pap was partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two or three things from the list and say we wouldn't borrow them any more—then he reckoned it wouldn't be no harm to borrow the others. So we talked it over all one night, drifting along down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons, or what. But towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory, and concluded to drop crabapples and p'simmons." (Chapter 12)


Huckleberry Finn