A Tale of Two Cities

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Facsimile of the original 1st publication of "A Tale of Two Cities" in All the year round". S4ulanguages.com. Retrieved 5 January 2013. 
  2. ^ Mitchell, David. (8 May 2010) "David Mitchell on Historical Fiction", The Telegraph: "Charles Dickens’ second stab at a historical novel, A Tale of Two Cities, has sold more than 200 million copies to date, making it the bestselling novel — in any genre — of all time...."
  3. ^ "Chapter 1, opening paragraph". wikisource. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 
  4. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 191 (Book 2, Chapter 16).
  5. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 128 (Book 2, Chapter 9). This statement (about the roof) is truer than the Marquis knows, and another example of foreshadowing: the Evrémonde château is burned down by revolting peasants in Book 2, Chapter 23.
  6. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 134 (Book 2, Chapter 9)
  7. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 159 (Book 2, Chapter 14)
  8. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 330 (Book 3, Chapter 9)
  9. ^ Emigration is about to be made illegal but is not yet. See Dickens 2003, p. 258 (Book 3, Chapter 1)
  10. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 344 (Book 3, Chapter 10)
  11. ^ Dickens 2003, (Book 3, Chapter 12)
  12. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 390 (Book 3, Chapter 15)
  13. ^ "www.dickensfellowship.org, 'Dickens as a Fiction Writer'". Retrieved 2015-01-01. 
  14. ^ a b Dickens, Charles (1970) [1859]. George Woodcock, ed. A tale of two cities. Illust. by Hablot L. Browne. Penguin Books. pp. 408, 410; Notes 30 and 41. ISBN 0140430547. 
  15. ^ Dickens 2003, p. xxxix
  16. ^ Dickens 2003, pp. 107–108 (Book 2, Chapter 6)
  17. ^ The Marquis emphasises his because Dickens is alluding to the (probably mythical) Droit du seigneur, under which any girl from the Marquis's land would belong to the Marquis rather than to her parents. Dickens 2003, p. 127 (Book 2, Chapter 9)
  18. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 212 (Book 2, Chapter 19)
  19. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 214 (Book 2, Chapter 19)
  20. ^ John 11.25-6
  21. ^ Biedermann 1994, p. 375
  22. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 21 (Book 1, Chapter 4)
  23. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 178 (Book 2, Chapter 15)
  24. ^ a b Dickens 2003, p. 223 (Book 2, Chapter 21)
  25. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 110 (Book 2, Chapter 7)
  26. ^ The Chevalier de la Barre was indeed executed for acts of impiety, including failure to pay homage to a procession of monks. These acts were attributed to him, it seems, by his mother's slighted lover. A synopsis of the story is given by Stanford University's Victorian Reading Project. See also Andrew Sanders, Companion to A Tale of Two Cities (London: Unwin Hyman, 1988), p.31; see also Voltaire, An Account of the Death of the Chevalier de la Barre (1766); translated by Simon Harvey, Treatise on Tolerance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).
  27. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 63 (Book 2, Chapter 2). Dickens is quoting Alexander Pope's Essay on Man of 1733.
  28. ^ Ruth Glancy has argued that Dickens portrays France and England as nearly equivalent at the beginning of the novel, but that as the novel progresses, England comes to look better and better, climaxing in Miss Pross's pro-Britain speech at the end of the novel.
  29. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 385 (Book 3, Chapter 15)
  30. ^ Dickens 2003, p. xxi
  31. ^ "Context of A Tale of Two Cities". Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
  32. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 89 (Book 2, Chapter 4) p. 89
  33. ^ Rabkin 2007, course booklet p. 48
  34. ^ Schlicke 2008, p. 53
  35. ^ A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens
  36. ^ "In their purest form [flat characters] ... are constructed round a single idea or quality. ... Part of the genius of Dickens is that he does use types and caricatures, people whom we recognise the instant they re-enter, and yet achieves effects that are not mechanical and a vision of humanity that is not shallow. Those who dislike Dickens have an excellent case. He ought to be bad." Forster 1927, p. 67, 71–72
  37. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 83 (Book 2, Chapter 4)
  38. ^ After Dr. Manette's letter is read, Darnay says that "It was the always-vain endeavour to discharge my poor mother's trust, that first brought my fatal presence near you." (Dickens 2003, p. 347 [Book 3, Chapter 11].) Darnay seems to be referring to the time when his mother brought him, still a child, to her meeting with Dr. Manette in Book 3, Chapter 10. But some readers also feel that Darnay is explaining why he changed his name and travelled to England in the first place: to discharge his family's debt to Dr. Manette without fully revealing his identity. (See note to the Penguin Classics edition: Dickens 2003, p. 486.)
  39. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 470
  40. ^ The Marquis is sometimes referred to as "Monseigneur the Marquis St. Evrémonde." He is not so called in this article because the title "Monseigneur" applies to whoever among a group is of the highest status; thus, this title sometimes applies to the Marquis and other times does not.
  41. ^ Stryver, like Carton, is a barrister and not a solicitor; Dickens 2003, p. xi
  42. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 147
  43. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 120 (Book 2, Chapter 8)
  44. ^ Dickens 2003, p. 462
  45. ^ Dickens by Peter Ackroyd; Harper Collins, 1990, p. 777
  46. ^ Dickens by Peter Ackroyd; Harper Collins, 1990, p. 859
  47. ^ Dickens by Peter Ackroyd; Harper Collins, 1990, p. 858-862
  48. ^ "Dickens on Radio 4". 
  49. ^ Dromgoole, Jessica. "A Tale of Two Cities on BBC Radio 4. And a podcast too!". 
  50. ^ "Sony Radio Academy Award Winners". The Guardian. 15 May 2012. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  51. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0504306/?ref_=fn_tt_tt_45
  52. ^ "Benjamin, Arthur". Boosey & Hawkes. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 

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