Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

The Green Girdle and Gawain

"On Sir Gawain that girdle of green appeared fine!

It looked rich on that red cloth, and rightly adorned."

-Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Lines 2036-2037

In the poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Gawain's acceptance of the green girdle shows his hidden character of self-absorption and fear of mortality. Gawain's real character is not represented by his pentangle, but rather by the green girdle. Gawain goes against his chivalric and Christian standards of honesty, courage and faith, and allows his animalistic instincts for survival to dictate his behavior.

Gawain acts upon his animalistic instincts when he accepts the green girdle from his seducer as a supposed "love token." In reality, he is only concerned with the girdle's special powers and its ability to possibly save his life. Gawain outwardly refuses to accept such a gift when he is first presented with the lady's girdle. It is only after the lady explains that the seemingly simple piece of silk is actually a "prize" that is "praiseworthy, precious, and fine," (1850) that Gawain consents to keeping the gift. Gawain constantly dwells on his fate: "In the deepest of dreams, Gawain drowsily spoke-- / As a man...

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