Shakespeare's Sonnets

Notes

  1. ^ Stanley Wells and Michael Dobson, eds., The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare Oxford University Press, 2001, p. 439.
  2. ^ Burrow, Colin, William Shakespeare: Complete Sonnets and Poems, Oxford University Press, 2002, p. 98.
  3. ^ Foster, Donald. "Master W.H., R.I.P." PMLA 102 (1987) 42–54, 42.
  4. ^ Burrow, Colin (2002). Complete Sonnets and Poems. Oxford University Press. p. 99. ISBN 0-19-818431-X. 
  5. ^ Foster 1984, 43.
  6. ^ Vickers, Brian (2007). Shakespeare, A lover's complaint, and John Davies of Hereford. Cambridge University Press. p. 8. ISBN 0-521-85912-3. 
  7. ^ Burrow 2002, 380.
  8. ^ a b c Schoenbaum, S. (1977). William Shakespeare: a compact documentary life (1st ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 270–271. ISBN 0-19-502211-4. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  9. ^ Foster, 1987.
  10. ^ Bate, Jonathan. The Genius of Shakespeare (1998) 61–62.
  11. ^ Vickers, 2007,8
  12. ^ Collins, John Churton. Ephemera Critica. Westminster, Constable and Co., 1902; p. 216.
  13. ^ Appleby, John C (January 2008). "Hervey, William, Baron Hervey of Kidbrooke and Baron Hervey of Ross (d. 1642)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. 
  14. ^ Berryman, John (2001). Haffenden, John, ed. Berryman's Shakespeare: essays, letters and other writings. London: Tauris Parke. p. xxxvi. ISBN 978-1-86064-643-0. 
  15. ^ Neil, Samuel (27 April 1867). Athenæum (London): 552.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  16. ^ Neil, Samuel (1863). Shakespere: a critical biography. London: Houlston and Wright. pp. 105–106. OCLC 77866350. 
  17. ^ Colin Burrow, ed. The Complete Sonnets and Poems (Oxford UP, 2002), p. 98; 102-3.
  18. ^ Hyder Edward Rollins, The Sonnets, New Variorum Shakespeare, vol. 25 II, Lippincott, 1944, p. 181−4.
  19. ^ A metre in poetry with five iambic metrical feet, which stems from the Italian word endecasillabo, for a line composed of five beats with an anacrusis, an upbeat or unstressed syllable at the beginning of a line which is no part of the first foot.
  20. ^ "The International Literary Quarterly". Interlitq.org. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  21. ^ Articles by FORT, J. A. (1933-01-01). "The Order And Chronology Of Shakespeare'S Sonnets". Res.oxfordjournals.org. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  22. ^ Boyd, William (19 November 2005). "Two Loves Have I". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 February 2011. 
  23. ^ a b Matz, Robert. The World of Shakespeare's Sonnets: An Introduction. p. 111. ISBN 978-0-7864-3219-6. 
  24. ^ Furness, Hannah (2013-01-08). "Has Shakespeare's dark lady finally been revealed?". Telegraph. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  25. ^ "'Dark Lady' of Shakespeare's sonnets 'finally revealed to be London prostitute called Lucy Negro' | Mail Online". Dailymail.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  26. ^ a b MacD. P. Jackson (2005-04-01). "Francis Meres and the Cultural Contexts of Shakespeare's Rival Poet Sonnets". Res.oxfordjournals.org. Retrieved 2014-04-02. 
  27. ^ Stapleton, M. L. "Shakespeare's Man Right Fair as Sonnet Lady." Texas Studies in Literature and Language 46 (2004): 272
  28. ^ Sanderlin, George (June 1939). "The Repute of Shakespeare's Sonnets in the Early Nineteenth Century". Modern Language Notes (The Johns Hopkins University Press) 54 (6): 462–466. doi:10.2307/2910858. JSTOR 2910858. 
  29. ^ Sonetto-shū, translated by Takamatsu Yūitsu, Iwanami Shoten, Tokyo 1986
  30. ^ Tüm Soneler, translated by Talat Sait Halman, Istanbul 1989
  31. ^ Shakespeare: La sonetoj (sonnets in Esperanto), Translated by William Auld, Edistudio,

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